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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup

Sqwertz wrote:
>
>Sheldon "brags" <cough> about everything he makes, but it's weird how
>we never see or hear about all these things he makes "all the time".


There's no bragging whatsoever, I brag about pussys but I don't brag
about food... I cook and eat very ordinary everyday foods and I post
photos often... if you feel by my posting photos of ordinary cuts of
meat in the same chipped dish on my stinking yellow counter is
bragging then you are majorly insecure... but insecurity is a common
personality flaw of dwarfed minds.

>And if he had a 10lb bag he wouldn't be complaining about the price of
>wild rice.


Mentioning that wild rice is too expensive to waste is not
complaining, it's a statement of fact, but fact is I don't pay for it,
I said it was sent to me by someone I know well.

>He's just bullshitting.


Bullshitting about what, rice... by now you should know better than to
think I'd claim having something in my pantry I can't prove... this is
what I have remaining until the next supply (about 6 lbs), will likely
be 2-3 years yet, I don't use much wild rice, I may not even ask for
more, I'm not all that fond of wild rice, it's not at all flavorful,
it adds a particular texture is all:
http://i57.tinypic.com/2qvuk36.jpg
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
wrote:

>On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>
>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>
>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg

>
>See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>
>That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>mine (can you tell?).


"2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
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On 12/17/2014 11:58 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
e.
> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>


You utter moron. What the **** do you think parching wild rice IS?



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"Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
> wrote:
>
>>On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>
>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>
>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg

>>
>>See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>
>>That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>>grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>mine (can you tell?).

>
> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.


No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.

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On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:47:07 -0600, Moe DeLoughan >
wrote:

>On 12/17/2014 11:58 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>e.
>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>

>
>You utter moron. What the **** do you think parching wild rice IS?


You uneducated jerk, you're as low IQ as our dwarf donkey... parching
any grain simply means to minimally dry it enough by mildly heating so
it doesn't mold/sprout in storage, parched does NOT mean toasted...
can't really sun dry wild rice in the climate where it grows. Parching
is definitely an *artificial* drying process and not a natural drying
process, but it's NOT toasting.
http://www.northernwilds.com/pages/E...and-fire.shtml


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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup

On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:26:57 -0600, Sqwertz >
wrote:

>On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:47:21 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>
>> Bullshitting about what, rice... by now you should know better than to
>> think I'd claim having something in my pantry I can't prove... this is
>> what I have remaining until the next supply (about 6 lbs), will likely
>> be 2-3 years yet, I don't use much wild rice, I may not even ask for
>> more, I'm not all that fond of wild rice, it's not at all flavorful,
>> it adds a particular texture is all:
>> http://i57.tinypic.com/2qvuk36.jpg

>
>That's the shitty cultivated stuff. No wonder you don't like it. I
>just cooked up some of the real wild rice after all this talk and it's
>worlds different than that dark stuff. I didn't even know there were
>two kinds of wild rice until now, but now I'm glad I discovered the
>real stuff. It only costs about 25% more ($5.69 vs $6.99/lb).


They are both real... but you wouldn't know, I don't see your wild
rice, dwarf.
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On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:

> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>
>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>
>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>
>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>
>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>> mine (can you tell?).

>>
>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.

>
> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.


Please tell me the difference between these then:

1 medium chopped onion

1 medium onion, chopped

Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has to
also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be successful.
Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the
recipe writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea
level.

USE YOUR BRAIN WHEN READING A RECIPE!

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"Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
...
> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>
>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>>
>>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>>
>>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>>
>>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>>> mine (can you tell?).
>>>
>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.

>>
>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.

>
> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>
> 1 medium chopped onion
>
> 1 medium onion, chopped
>
> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has to
> also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be successful.
> Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
> treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
> overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the recipe
> writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea level.
>

That's the same because it's a medium onion. But 2 cups of something
uncooked is not usually the same as 2 cups of something that has already
been cooked. If you take 2 cups of raw wild rice and cook it, the end
result will be 6-8 cups of rice. So if the recipe is written as 2 cups,
cooked...then it means 2 cups of raw rice, cooked. But if it says 2 cooked
cups of wild rice then it means 2 cups of rice after it has been cooked.
That's just basic knowledge.

> USE YOUR BRAIN WHEN READING A RECIPE!


I do.

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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup


"Sqwertz" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:04:06 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>
>> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>
>>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>
>>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
>>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>>
>>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.

>>
>> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>>
>> 1 medium chopped onion
>>
>> 1 medium onion, chopped
>>
>> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning.

>
> Only a moron would use an example like that. They mean the same thing
> in the context of a chopped onion. It's still a medium, RAW onion
> either way.
>
> With an example like that, it's obvious not worth trying to expkain
> logic to you.


Indeed!

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On 2014-12-17 23:49:21 +0000, Julie Bove said:

> "Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>
>>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>>>
>>>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>>>
>>>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>>>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>>>> mine (can you tell?).
>>>>
>>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
>>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>>
>>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.

>>
>> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>>
>> 1 medium chopped onion
>>
>> 1 medium onion, chopped
>>
>> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has to
>> also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be successful.
>> Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
>> treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
>> overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the
>> recipe writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea
>> level.
>>

> That's the same because it's a medium onion. But 2 cups of something
> uncooked is not usually the same as 2 cups of something that has
> already been cooked. If you take 2 cups of raw wild rice and cook it,
> the end result will be 6-8 cups of rice. So if the recipe is written
> as 2 cups, cooked...then it means 2 cups of raw rice, cooked. But if
> it says 2 cooked cups of wild rice then it means 2 cups of rice after
> it has been cooked. That's just basic knowledge.


No, it's not "basic knowledge."

What about this then:

1 onion, chopped

1 chopped onion

By your reasoning above these indicate different things because they
don't say "medium." That makes no sense, as I hope you can see.

>> USE YOUR BRAIN WHEN READING A RECIPE!

>
> I do.


If the rice was to be uncooked there wouldn't be any comma or the word
"cooked" at all. In fact, if the recipe writer wanted to avoid
ambiguity, he would specify uncooked rice if that was what he meant.
Not only that but the recipe would indicate that the rice be cooked in
the instruction steps!



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On 2014-12-16 02:33:30 +0000, Janet Wilder said:

> On 12/15/2014 7:28 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
>> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:20:12 -0500, jmcquown wrote:
>>
>>> I've been craving this soup. It's been years since I made it.
>>>
>>> http://www.food.com/recipe/byerlys-w...ce-soup-178083
>>>
>>> Byerly's Wild Rice Soup
>>>
>>> 6 tablespoons butter
>>> 1 tablespoon minced onion
>>> 1/2 cup flour
>>> 3 cups chicken broth
>>> 2 cups wild rice, cooked
>>> 1/3 cup cooked ham, diced
>>> 1/2 cup carrot, finely shredded
>>> 3 tablespoons slivered almonds (chopped)
>>> 1/2 teaspoon salt
>>> 1 cup half-and-half
>>> 2 tablespoons dry sherry
>>> snipped parsley (for garnish) or chives (for garnish)

>>
>> Is that 2 cups of cooked wild rice, or do you cook 2 cups of wild
>> rice?
>>
>> :-)
>>

>
> Funny man.


Two cups of cooked wild rice. Maybe 3/4 cup raw.

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www.barbschaller.com, last update April 2013

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On 2014-12-16 05:31:59 +0000, Oregonian Haruspex said:

>>
>> I'm not sure if t

>
> Damn Unison.
>
> I'm not sure if anybody else here can claim to have had the "real deal"
> or not, straight from the Byerly's restaurant, and to have eaten it
> with Don Byerly himself, but the amount of liquid sounds appropriate.
>
> I can email my mom and ask her to snap a photo of the recipe from her
> vintage Byerly's cookbook (signed by Don Byerly!) just to see if
> food.com's version is authentic.


Here is a link to Byerly's web site page with the recipe:
http://lundsandbyerlys.com/recipe/wild-rice-soup/
--
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www.barbschaller.com, last update April 2013

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On 2014-12-16 14:26:20 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:

> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 21:31:59 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex
> > wrote:
>
>>> I'm not sure if t

>>
>> Damn Unison.
>>
>> I'm not sure if anybody else here can claim to have had the "real deal"
>> or not, straight from the Byerly's restaurant, and to have eaten it
>> with Don Byerly himself, but the amount of liquid sounds appropriate.
>>
>> I can email my mom and ask her to snap a photo of the recipe from her
>> vintage Byerly's cookbook (signed by Don Byerly!) just to see if
>> food.com's version is authentic.

>
> I'd not want the "real deal". Thats not a recipe I'd consider, it's
> definitely a WASTE of expensive wild rice. This Byerly putz is pure
> TIAD.


Oh, settle down, Sheldon. Wy do you think it's a waste of expensive
grass seed? If Don Byerly is a putz, he's a pretty shrewd businessman
and has built a fine chain of small-medium-size supermarkets and enjoys
a reputation for selling high quality merchandise, some difficult to
find in larger chains. Personally, I like my wild rice soup better
it's not a wallpaper paste-thick soup and it has no ham or carrots.

Wild Rice Soup



Recipe By: Barb Schaller, Burnsville, Minnesota; posted again to rfc 12/17/2014



2 tablespoons butter

1 tablespoon minced onion

1/4 cup flour

4 cups chicken broth (I like to use homemade and I like to use more)

2 cups cooked wild rice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup half and half, (or heavy cream if you're feeling fancy)

2 tablespoons dry sherry, (or dry vermouth - a couple glugs)

Minced parsley


Cook butter, onion, and flour together. Remove from heat and gradually
stir in chicken broth. Stir in rice and salt, simmer 5-10 minutes.
Correct the seasoning then blend in the half and half and sherry; heat
but do not boil.

Sprinkle chopped parsley on top of each serving. Serves 4-6.

Variation: I usually sauté some sliced fresh mushrooms and chopped
celery with the butter and onion.

Please note that this is not a thick soup. If you want that, find a
recipe involving canned cream of chicken soup, but please don't waste
*this* rice on that.




Notes: I usually cook an entire package of wild rice and then freeze
it in 2-cup portions to use at will. This is not a gravy-thick soup
although it may thicken a bit as it stands.

I probably increase the amount of fat, flour, and onions in the roux, too.




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--
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www.barbschaller.com, last update April 2013

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On 2014-12-15 23:43:33 +0000, Oregonian Haruspex said:

> On 2014-12-15 21:20:12 +0000, jmcquown said:
>
>> I've been craving this soup. It's been years since I made it.
>>
>> http://www.food.com/recipe/byerlys-w...ce-soup-178083
>>
>> Byerly's Wild Rice Soup



(snipped)

> I grew up a couple miles from the original Byerly's in Golden Valley,
> MN. My mom and Don Byerly came to know each other well, and he often
> treated us to meals in the (formerly) upscale restaurant in the store.
> The store wasn't just a place to buy stuff - gourmet cooking classes
> were offered, anything could be obtained by special order, and Don
> gainfully employed many mentally and physically handicapped people from
> the area. Unfortunately since the Lund's buyout the store has declined
> in quality somewhat, but you can still get excellent quality meat and
> seafood at the butcher's counter.
>
> The key to making proper Byerly's wild rice soup is to use the correct
> wild rice. You must obtain the longer, slow-toasted grained wild rice
> harvested by many Ojibwe Indian nations. It is vastly superior to the
> commercially raised, hard, shiny black rice (we call that junk paddy
> rice in MN) and once you have it you will never buy paddy rice again.


I agree that the lake-grown rice is superior, but I've never heard the
other referred to as "junk paddy rice." (And I've always thought
their deli food was greatly overrated.) I buy my wild rice at
Northland Native American (Products?) on 14th and Franklin. It's now
about $12/lb, about the price it was in the 1950s.
--
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On 2014-12-16 03:00:29 +0000, Sqwertz said:

> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 20:33:30 -0600, Janet Wilder wrote:
>
>> On 12/15/2014 7:28 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
>>> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:20:12 -0500, jmcquown wrote:
>>>
>>>> I've been craving this soup. It's been years since I made it.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.food.com/recipe/byerlys-w...ce-soup-178083
>>>>
>>>> Byerly's Wild Rice Soup
>>>>
>>>> 6 tablespoons butter
>>>> 1 tablespoon minced onion
>>>> 1/2 cup flour
>>>> 3 cups chicken broth
>>>> 2 cups wild rice, cooked
>>>
>>> Is that 2 cups of cooked wild rice, or do you cook 2 cups of wild
>>> rice?

>>

>
> Ahh, but It really IS ambiguous. Especially when the same recipe uses
> terms such as:
>
> 1 tablespoon minced onion
> 1/3 cup cooked ham, diced
> 1/2 cup carrot, finely shredded
> 3 tablespoons slivered almonds (chopped)
>
> We would assume it's 2 cups of cooked wild rice (judging by the amount
> of liquid in the recipe), but then look at the "cooked ham" ingredient
> which is specifically cooked before measuring. And the onion is
> measure minced, so then why isn't the carrot listed as "1/2 cup finely
> shredded carrot"? Then we have a third form of ambiguity using
> parenthesis as in "almonds (chopped)".
>
> The order of the terms used in this recipe are not consistent and
> could be confusing to some people. As an editor yourself I would
> think you would consider this bad form.
>
> -sw


I'm not even an editor and I consider it bad form. Tsk, tsk.

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On 2014-12-16 05:29:19 +0000, Oregonian Haruspex said:
(snipped)
>>>
>>> The order of the terms used in this recipe are not consistent and
>>> could be confusing to some people. As an editor yourself I would
>>> think you would consider this bad form.
>>>
>>> -sw

>>
>> Yep. Certainly wouldn't work as written. The wild rice that I cooked
>> yesterday called for 2 cups of broth to 1/2 cup of rice. And it wasn't
>> soup.

>
> It would work as written. Properly done, this soup is very thick
> indeed. Almost a rice casserole in texture.
>
>

Which is why I am not a fan. If I want hotdish, I'll make hotdish. If
I want soup, I make soup.
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On 2014-12-17 17:47:21 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:

> Sqwertz wrote:
>>
>> Sheldon "brags" <cough> about everything he makes, but it's weird how
>> we never see or hear about all these things he makes "all the time".

>
> There's no bragging whatsoever, I brag about pussys but I don't brag
> about food... I cook and eat very ordinary everyday foods and I post
> photos often... if you feel by my posting photos of ordinary cuts of
> meat in the same chipped dish on my stinking yellow counter is
> bragging then you are majorly insecure... but insecurity is a common
> personality flaw of dwarfed minds.
>
>> And if he had a 10lb bag he wouldn't be complaining about the price of
>> wild rice.

>
> Mentioning that wild rice is too expensive to waste is not
> complaining, it's a statement of fact, but fact is I don't pay for it,
> I said it was sent to me by someone I know well.
>
>> He's just bullshitting.

>
> Bullshitting about what, rice... by now you should know better than to
> think I'd claim having something in my pantry I can't prove... this is
> what I have remaining until the next supply (about 6 lbs), will likely
> be 2-3 years yet, I don't use much wild rice, I may not even ask for
> more, I'm not all that fond of wild rice, it's not at all flavorful,
> it adds a particular texture is all:
> http://i57.tinypic.com/2qvuk36.jpg


It's marked long grain but it looks broken, sold as "soup rice" and
less expensive. Have you ever had the lake grown, hand harvested, hand
winnowed, and parched over a wood flame? It's pretty good. '-)

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On 2014-12-17 18:26:57 +0000, Sqwertz said:

> On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:47:21 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>
>> Bullshitting about what, rice... by now you should know better than to
>> think I'd claim having something in my pantry I can't prove... this is
>> what I have remaining until the next supply (about 6 lbs), will likely
>> be 2-3 years yet, I don't use much wild rice, I may not even ask for
>> more, I'm not all that fond of wild rice, it's not at all flavorful,
>> it adds a particular texture is all:
>> http://i57.tinypic.com/2qvuk36.jpg

>
> That's the shitty cultivated stuff. No wonder you don't like it. I
> just cooked up some of the real wild rice after all this talk and it's
> worlds different than that dark stuff. I didn't even know there were
> two kinds of wild rice until now, but now I'm glad I discovered the
> real stuff. It only costs about 25% more ($5.69 vs $6.99/lb).
>
> -sw


What are you getting that's $7/lb? Or where are you getting it?
--
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On 2014-12-17 03:12:04 +0000, Sqwertz said:

> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:40:26 -0600, Moe DeLoughan wrote:
>
>> On 12/16/2014 8:26 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>>
>>> I'd not want the "real deal". Thats not a recipe I'd consider, it's
>>> definitely a WASTE of expensive wild rice. This Byerly putz is pure
>>> TIAD.

>>
>> You don't know jack about wild rice.

>
> You can add that to the long list of other things he doesn't know
> about but feels the need to spout off about.
>
>> Us native Minnesotans know all
>> about it - and, as Oregonian Haruspex mentioned, the black paddy-grown
>> cultivated 'wild' rice is garbage. The genuine hand-harvested wild
>> rice is far superior and not that much more expensive.
>>
>> http://www.bineshiiwildrice.com/GOURMET_WILD_R.htm
>>
>> Wild rice soup is one of the classic uses of wild rice, along with its
>> use as a poultry stuffing, pilaf, and of course, the main component of
>> wild rice hotdish.

>
> My current, unopened bag of Moose Lake Wild Rice (not cultivated -
> looks different than other wild rices I've bought) comes with a
> leaflet of recipes including wild rice soup. It's hamburger and
> tomato based, so I think I'll pass on that one. Ground beef doesn't
> belong in soup. But some of the other recipes look decent.
>
> http://www.mooselakewildrice.com/recipes.html
>
> Ironically, the leaflet has a Wild Rice and Grape Salad recipe, but
> the grapes have been taken out of the recipe shown on the website
> above. I wonder if they did that because of the beating that the New
> York Times food editors received over publishing that Infamous
> Minnesota Thanksgiving Grape Salad recipe?
>
> -sw


Yu can turn it into a wild rice salad with dried cranberries, chopped
green onions, and a raspberry vinaigrette. Not bad. And this is
pretty good, too, though it's been years since I've made them.

Wild Rice Cakes



Recipe By:

Serving Size: 1



Ingredients:



3 cups cooked and chilled wild rice

1 1/2 cups leeks (half-moon cut)

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon butter

1/2 cup cream

3/4 cup cooked corn

2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

1 1/2 teaspoons chives

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon salt

1 egg lightly beaten

1 1/4 cups flour maybe more



Directions:



Sauté leeks in butter and garlic, and mix with remaining ingredients.
Using a clean griddle with light oil, spoon 4 ounces of the mixture
onto griddle and gently pat 1/2 thick and 4-5 inches in diameter.
Brown firm on both sides.

Serve with mushroom sauce.




Notes: Source: Executive Chef Steven Fohl of Temecula Creek Inn.
Havent a clue where that is; tasted the wild rice cakes with mushroom
sauce at the 1997 Food & Wine Experience, February 28, at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel, Minneapolis. Indian Harvest Specialtifoods, Inc., P. O.
Box 428, Bemidji, MN 56619; 1-800-346-7032.




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On 2014-12-17 17:58:44 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:

> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
> wrote:
>
>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>
>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>
>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg

>>
>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>
>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>> mine (can you tell?).

>
> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.


No, Sheldon, it does not mean the same thing. "2 cups wild rice,
cooked" means you measure two cups of wild rice, then cook it. It's
not an urban legend.
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On 12/17/2014 9:50 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> On 2014-12-17 17:47:21 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:
>
>> Bullshitting about what, rice... by now you should know better than to
>> think I'd claim having something in my pantry I can't prove... this is
>> what I have remaining until the next supply (about 6 lbs), will likely
>> be 2-3 years yet, I don't use much wild rice, I may not even ask for
>> more, I'm not all that fond of wild rice, it's not at all flavorful,
>> it adds a particular texture is all:
>> http://i57.tinypic.com/2qvuk36.jpg

>
> It's marked long grain but it looks broken, sold as "soup rice" and less
> expensive. Have you ever had the lake grown, hand harvested, hand
> winnowed, and parched over a wood flame? It's pretty good. '-)
>

Yep, it looks like the bag of broken wild rice Damsel once sent to me.
Pretty much only good for soup or for a *homemade* version of Uncle
Ben's white & wild seasoned rice. Broken wild rice is for when pretty
doesn't matter.

Jill
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On 2014-12-16 14:21:16 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:

> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 19:28:27 -0600, Sqwertz >
> wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:20:12 -0500, jmcquown wrote:
>>
>>> I've been craving this soup. It's been years since I made it.
>>>
>>> http://www.food.com/recipe/byerlys-w...ce-soup-178083
>>>
>>> Byerly's Wild Rice Soup
>>>
>>> 6 tablespoons butter
>>> 1 tablespoon minced onion
>>> 1/2 cup flour
>>> 3 cups chicken broth
>>> 2 cups wild rice, cooked
>>> 1/3 cup cooked ham, diced
>>> 1/2 cup carrot, finely shredded
>>> 3 tablespoons slivered almonds (chopped)
>>> 1/2 teaspoon salt
>>> 1 cup half-and-half
>>> 2 tablespoons dry sherry
>>> snipped parsley (for garnish) or chives (for garnish)

>>
>> Is that 2 cups of cooked wild rice, or do you cook 2 cups of wild
>> rice?
>>
>> :-)

>
> That comma says 2 cups of cooked rice, not 2 cups of raw rice... which
> of course is dumb since it's exceedingly rare to add cooked rice to a
> home made soup... there's not nearly enough liquid in that recipe to
> call it a soup anyway, more a pilaf. I'd question that 1/2 cup of
> flour, that's enough to make library paste pudding, not soup.


No, the comma says you measure 2 cups of wild rice, then cook it. And
if I added raw rice to soup, it would absorb way too much broth. I
consider gumbo to be soup and the standard serving is to put a small
portion of cooked rice into a soup bowl or plate and add the gumbo to
it.
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"Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
...
> On 2014-12-17 23:49:21 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>
>> "Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>>
>>>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>>>>
>>>>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>>>>
>>>>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>>>>> mine (can you tell?).
>>>>>
>>>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
>>>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>>>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>>>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>>>
>>>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.
>>>
>>> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>>>
>>> 1 medium chopped onion
>>>
>>> 1 medium onion, chopped
>>>
>>> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has to
>>> also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be successful.
>>> Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
>>> treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
>>> overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the recipe
>>> writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea level.
>>>

>> That's the same because it's a medium onion. But 2 cups of something
>> uncooked is not usually the same as 2 cups of something that has already
>> been cooked. If you take 2 cups of raw wild rice and cook it, the end
>> result will be 6-8 cups of rice. So if the recipe is written as 2 cups,
>> cooked...then it means 2 cups of raw rice, cooked. But if it says 2
>> cooked cups of wild rice then it means 2 cups of rice after it has been
>> cooked. That's just basic knowledge.

>
> No, it's not "basic knowledge."
>
> What about this then:
>
> 1 onion, chopped
>
> 1 chopped onion


Again, not the same thing. One would always presume that the onion was raw
as there is no mention of cooking. The probem in the case of the wild rice
is the placement of the comma.
>
> By your reasoning above these indicate different things because they don't
> say "medium." That makes no sense, as I hope you can see.


No. You just don't get it.
>
>>> USE YOUR BRAIN WHEN READING A RECIPE!

>>
>> I do.

>
> If the rice was to be uncooked there wouldn't be any comma or the word
> "cooked" at all. In fact, if the recipe writer wanted to avoid ambiguity,
> he would specify uncooked rice if that was what he meant. Not only that
> but the recipe would indicate that the rice be cooked in the instruction
> steps!


Actually you are wrong on that. This goes back to what I learned in
learning to read a cookbook and it was reiterated in Home Ec class.

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"Sqwertz" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 15:58:57 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>
>> On 2014-12-17 23:49:21 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>
>>> "Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>>>
>>>>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>>>>> ...
>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>>>>>> mine (can you tell?).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild
>>>>>> rice,
>>>>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>>>>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>>>>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>>>>
>>>>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.
>>>>
>>>> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>>>>
>>>> 1 medium chopped onion
>>>>
>>>> 1 medium onion, chopped
>>>>
>>>> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has to
>>>> also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be successful.
>>>> Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
>>>> treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
>>>> overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the
>>>> recipe writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea
>>>> level.
>>>>
>>> That's the same because it's a medium onion. But 2 cups of something
>>> uncooked is not usually the same as 2 cups of something that has
>>> already been cooked. If you take 2 cups of raw wild rice and cook it,
>>> the end result will be 6-8 cups of rice. So if the recipe is written
>>> as 2 cups, cooked...then it means 2 cups of raw rice, cooked. But if
>>> it says 2 cooked cups of wild rice then it means 2 cups of rice after
>>> it has been cooked. That's just basic knowledge.

>>
>> No, it's not "basic knowledge."
>>
>> What about this then:
>>
>> 1 onion, chopped
>>
>> 1 chopped onion
>>
>> By your reasoning above these indicate different things because they
>> don't say "medium." That makes no sense, as I hope you can see.

>
> I think we have a new suitor for Jerry Sauk over in
> alt.food.fast-food. Those two were made for each other.


Maybe so. Wonder how many recipes he screws up?

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"Melba's Jammin'" > wrote in message
news:2014121721051646603-barbschaller@earthlinknet...
> On 2014-12-16 14:21:16 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:
>
>> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 19:28:27 -0600, Sqwertz >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:20:12 -0500, jmcquown wrote:
>>>
>>>> I've been craving this soup. It's been years since I made it.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.food.com/recipe/byerlys-w...ce-soup-178083
>>>>
>>>> Byerly's Wild Rice Soup
>>>>
>>>> 6 tablespoons butter
>>>> 1 tablespoon minced onion
>>>> 1/2 cup flour
>>>> 3 cups chicken broth
>>>> 2 cups wild rice, cooked
>>>> 1/3 cup cooked ham, diced
>>>> 1/2 cup carrot, finely shredded
>>>> 3 tablespoons slivered almonds (chopped)
>>>> 1/2 teaspoon salt
>>>> 1 cup half-and-half
>>>> 2 tablespoons dry sherry
>>>> snipped parsley (for garnish) or chives (for garnish)
>>>
>>> Is that 2 cups of cooked wild rice, or do you cook 2 cups of wild
>>> rice?
>>>
>>> :-)

>>
>> That comma says 2 cups of cooked rice, not 2 cups of raw rice... which
>> of course is dumb since it's exceedingly rare to add cooked rice to a
>> home made soup... there's not nearly enough liquid in that recipe to
>> call it a soup anyway, more a pilaf. I'd question that 1/2 cup of
>> flour, that's enough to make library paste pudding, not soup.

>
> No, the comma says you measure 2 cups of wild rice, then cook it. And if
> I added raw rice to soup, it would absorb way too much broth. I consider
> gumbo to be soup and the standard serving is to put a small portion of
> cooked rice into a soup bowl or plate and add the gumbo to it.


I learned from a chef that you must cook pasta and rice separately and then
add it to the soup or it will suck up all the liquid. The only time I do
not take this step is if I am making a very small amount of soup to be
consumed right away.



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My wild rice soup, posted in 1995: http//tinyurl.com/orydkop. It's Mimi Hiller's
reposting, along with her comments.

N.
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On 12/18/2014 8:54 AM, Nancy2 wrote:
> My wild rice soup, posted in 1995: http//tinyurl.com/orydkop. It's Mimi Hiller's
> reposting, along with her comments.
>
> N.
>

That link doesn't bring up anything about wild rice soup.

Jill
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 05:54:30 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
> wrote:

> My wild rice soup, posted in 1995: http//tinyurl.com/orydkop. It's Mimi Hiller's
> reposting, along with her comments.
>
> N.


Remove the http// to get it to even work, get to some weird interface
with google groups. Sign in, go to My Groups. No idea what to do
next. Why don't you just post it here?

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On Thursday, December 18, 2014 7:54:35 AM UTC-6, Nancy2 wrote:
> My wild rice soup, posted in 1995: http//tinyurl.com/orydkop. It's Mimi Hiller's
> reposting, along with her comments.
>
> N.


Sorry the link didn't work. Here it is, without Mimi's comments. You can find the original post by searching Google Groups for "Nancy Wild Rice Soup.."

Cream of Chicken Soup with Wild Rice Nancy Dooley

(8 servings according to recipe, but more like 18
it makes A LOT!)

8 oz. uncooked wild rice (1 1/3 C.)
1 3 pound fryer chicken, cut up (I used 4 lbs. of "Pick of the Chick."
7 C. water
8 oz. sliced mushrooms
2 T. cooking oil
1 C. chopped onion
1 C. chopped celery
2 T. instant chicken bouillon granules
3/4 tsp. white pepper (I put in a tad more than that)
tsp. salt (I didn't add any extra because of the bouillon)
C. butter
3/4 C. all-purpose flour
4 C. milk
3/4 C. dry white wine

Rinse and drain wild rice 3 or 4 times and then cook according to pkg. directions for 40 minutes; drain off liquid and rinse thoroughly. Set aside.

In a large saucepan, combine the chicken and water. Bring to boiling, reduce heat and simmer for 40 minutes or until the chicken is tender. Remove chicken from broth and let stand until cook enough to handle. Skim fat from broth. Strain and reserve broth. Remove chicken meat from bones. Cut into bite-size pieces. In the same saucepan, cook celery and onion in hot oil for 4-5 minutes; add mushrooms and cover and cook for 5 to 10 minutes or until everything is tender, stirring now and then. Remove from heat. Return the broth to the saucepan.

Add the partially cooked wild rice to the chicken broth mixture. Stir in the bouillon granules, white pepper and salt. Bring to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 15 minutes.


In a large separate saucepan, melt the butter. Stir in flour until it all clings together and is smooth. Add the milk all at once and stir and cook until it's bubbly and thick. Add some hot broth mixture to the white sauce mixture and stir until smooth; return all to the broth mixture. Stir in the chicken pieces and the white wine. Heat through. Makes 8 servings.
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On 2014-12-18 11:30:59 +0000, Julie Bove said:

> "Sqwertz" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 15:58:57 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>
>>> On 2014-12-17 23:49:21 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>>
>>>> "Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>>>>
>>>>>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz >
>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through the
>>>>>>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>>>>>>> mine (can you tell?).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
>>>>>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma usage.
>>>>>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked in
>>>>>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.
>>>>>
>>>>> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>>>>>
>>>>> 1 medium chopped onion
>>>>>
>>>>> 1 medium onion, chopped
>>>>>
>>>>> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has to
>>>>> also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be successful.
>>>>> Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
>>>>> treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
>>>>> overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the
>>>>> recipe writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea
>>>>> level.
>>>>>
>>>> That's the same because it's a medium onion. But 2 cups of something
>>>> uncooked is not usually the same as 2 cups of something that has
>>>> already been cooked. If you take 2 cups of raw wild rice and cook it,
>>>> the end result will be 6-8 cups of rice. So if the recipe is written
>>>> as 2 cups, cooked...then it means 2 cups of raw rice, cooked. But if
>>>> it says 2 cooked cups of wild rice then it means 2 cups of rice after
>>>> it has been cooked. That's just basic knowledge.
>>>
>>> No, it's not "basic knowledge."
>>>
>>> What about this then:
>>>
>>> 1 onion, chopped
>>>
>>> 1 chopped onion
>>>
>>> By your reasoning above these indicate different things because they
>>> don't say "medium." That makes no sense, as I hope you can see.

>>
>> I think we have a new suitor for Jerry Sauk over in
>> alt.food.fast-food. Those two were made for each other.

>
> Maybe so. Wonder how many recipes he screws up?


Just for your elucidation, I can't remember the last time I felt
compelled to actually follow a recipe. Accomplished cooks don't need
'em and look at them with something of a blend of suspicion and
contempt. I do read recipes but only to perhaps glean an idea or two.
There are too many variables to consider and I have seen questionable
recipe steps even from the likes of Heston Blumenthal and Jacques Pepin.

Anyway I certainly wouldn't deliberately screw up a recipe (if I
decided to use one) because I decided to misread one, as you seem to be
determined to do.



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Barb, with all due respect, "2 cups wild rice, cooked," means (as written) 2 cups of raw
Wild rice, then cooked. It is not written correctly, based on the proportions of the other
ingredients. It should have been written,"2 cups cooked wild rice."

But I guess I am late to the discussion...I was out in my canoe, trying to find some wild
rice to harvest. 😃

N.
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:25:45 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
> wrote:

>Barb, with all due respect, "2 cups wild rice, cooked," means (as written) 2 cups of raw
>Wild rice, then cooked. It is not written correctly, based on the proportions of the other
>ingredients. It should have been written,"2 cups cooked wild rice."
>
>But I guess I am late to the discussion...I was out in my canoe, trying to find some wild
>rice to harvest. ?
>
>N.


ALL of the recipes in the literature included with my wild rice say
"UNcooked" wild rice, especially for soups... only recipe that says
cooked wild rice is for a meat loaf recipe. Schaller is another one
who has no clue what a comma means, she must have graduated from the
same *junior* high school as the dwarf.
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"Sqwertz" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 19:39:53 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:25:45 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>Barb, with all due respect, "2 cups wild rice, cooked," means (as
>>>written) 2 cups of raw
>>>Wild rice, then cooked. It is not written correctly, based on the
>>>proportions of the other
>>>ingredients. It should have been written,"2 cups cooked wild rice."
>>>
>>>But I guess I am late to the discussion...I was out in my canoe, trying
>>>to find some wild
>>>rice to harvest. ?
>>>
>>>N.

>>
>> ALL of the recipes in the literature included with my wild rice say
>> "UNcooked" wild rice, especially for soups... only recipe that says
>> cooked wild rice is for a meat loaf recipe. Schaller is another one
>> who has no clue what a comma means, she must have graduated from the
>> same *junior* high school as the dwarf.

>
> Earlier in the thread you were arguing that it meant cooked wild rice:
>
> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
> cooked".
>
> And now here you are trying to take pot shots at Barb who was AGREEING
> with you, yet now you're trying to change your stance saying it means
> uncooked wild rice. Make up your feeble little mind, will ya?
>
> You are what is known as a Genuine Usenet Kook, Pussy Katz. You argue
> just to be obnoxious forgetting WTF you were arguing about in the
> first place. Get a grip, dude.
>
> ObFood: Canned Corned beef hash fried until crispy on the bottom.
> Then topped with two raw eggs, sunny-side up, until cooked. Comfort
> food (but not from my childhood).
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwert...ream/lightbox/
>
> -sw


so that's two eggs, cooked?


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On 2014-12-18 03:08:23 +0000, Sqwertz said:

> On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 20:51:54 -0600, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
>> On 2014-12-17 18:26:57 +0000, Sqwertz said:
>>
>>> That's the shitty cultivated stuff. No wonder you don't like it. I
>>> just cooked up some of the real wild rice after all this talk and it's
>>> worlds different than that dark stuff. I didn't even know there were
>>> two kinds of wild rice until now, but now I'm glad I discovered the
>>> real stuff. It only costs about 25% more ($5.69 vs $6.99/lb).

>>
>> What are you getting that's $7/lb? Or where are you getting it?

>
> http://www.mooselakewildrice.com/sto...adb0 019d4128
>
>
> -sw


I'm impressed. That's a good price.
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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup

On 2014-12-18 23:25:45 +0000, Nancy2 said:

> Barb, with all due respect, "2 cups wild rice, cooked," means (as
> written) 2 cups of raw
> Wild rice, then cooked. It is not written correctly, based on the
> proportions of the other
> ingredients. It should have been written,"2 cups cooked wild rice."
> But I guess I am late to the discussion...I was out in my canoe, trying
> to find some wild
> rice to harvest. 😃
>
> N.


No due respect necessary. I'm with you. :-0)
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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup

On 2014-12-19 00:39:53 +0000, Brooklyn1 said:

> On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:25:45 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
> > wrote:
>
>> Barb, with all due respect, "2 cups wild rice, cooked," means (as
>> written) 2 cups of raw
>> Wild rice, then cooked. It is not written correctly, based on the
>> proportions of the other
>> ingredients. It should have been written,"2 cups cooked wild rice."
>>
>> But I guess I am late to the discussion...I was out in my canoe, trying
>> to find some wild
>> rice to harvest. ?
>>
>> N.

>
> ALL of the recipes in the literature included with my wild rice say
> "UNcooked" wild rice, especially for soups... only recipe that says
> cooked wild rice is for a meat loaf recipe. Schaller is another one
> who has no clue what a comma means, she must have graduated from the
> same *junior* high school as the dwarf.


Hey, at least we graduated. ;-P
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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup

On 2014-12-19 01:30:10 +0000, Sqwertz said:

> On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 19:39:53 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 15:25:45 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> Barb, with all due respect, "2 cups wild rice, cooked," means (as
>>> written) 2 cups of raw
>>> Wild rice, then cooked. It is not written correctly, based on the
>>> proportions of the other
>>> ingredients. It should have been written,"2 cups cooked wild rice."
>>>
>>> But I guess I am late to the discussion...I was out in my canoe, trying
>>> to find some wild
>>> rice to harvest. ?
>>>
>>> N.

>>
>> ALL of the recipes in the literature included with my wild rice say
>> "UNcooked" wild rice, especially for soups... only recipe that says
>> cooked wild rice is for a meat loaf recipe. Schaller is another one
>> who has no clue what a comma means, she must have graduated from the
>> same *junior* high school as the dwarf.

>
> Earlier in the thread you were arguing that it meant cooked wild rice:
>
> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild rice,
> cooked".
>
> And now here you are trying to take pot shots at Barb who was AGREEING
> with you, yet now you're trying to change your stance saying it means
> uncooked wild rice. Make up your feeble little mind, will ya?


Jesus, where was I agreeing with Sheldon? "2 cups wild rice, cooked"
means you measure 2 cups of raw rice then cook it. I'll have to see
if I can find what I said that has you and Nancy thinking I agree with
Sheldon. Mmmmm, not so much.
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On 2014-12-19 01:40:58 +0000, Reggie said:

> "Sqwertz" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> ObFood: Canned Corned beef hash fried until crispy on the bottom.
>> Then topped with two raw eggs, sunny-side up, until cooked. Comfort
>> food (but not from my childhood).
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwert...ream/lightbox/
>>
>> -sw

>
> so that's two eggs, cooked?


Seems like it should read, "Then top with two raw eggs and cook until
they're done "sunny side up." Or to that effect.
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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup

In article >, sf
> wrote:

> On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 05:54:30 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
> > wrote:
>
> > My wild rice soup, posted in 1995: http//tinyurl.com/orydkop. It's Mimi
> > Hiller's
> > reposting, along with her comments.
> >
> > N.

>
> Remove the http// to get it to even work, get to some weird interface
> with google groups. Sign in, go to My Groups. No idea what to do
> next. Why don't you just post it here?


That's because it's not a valid URL. No colon. Try
<http://tinyurl.com/orydkop> which is unsatisfying as well and probably
what you saw. I'll pass on jumping through google hoops.

leo
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Default Byerly's Wild Rice Soup


"Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
...
> On 2014-12-18 11:30:59 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>
>> "Sqwertz" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> On Wed, 17 Dec 2014 15:58:57 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 2014-12-17 23:49:21 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>>>
>>>>> "Oregonian Haruspex" > wrote in message
>>>>> ...
>>>>>> On 2014-12-17 20:21:27 +0000, Julie Bove said:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Brooklyn1" > wrote in message
>>>>>>> ...
>>>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:09:21 -0600, Sqwertz
>>>>>>>> >
>>>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:46:45 -0800, Oregonian Haruspex wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> She took the photo last night so here we go!
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> http://i.imgur.com/nsvBZLc.jpg
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> See how that's written? "2 cups COOKED wild rice".
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> That recipe was written correctly. But as it gets poassed through
>>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>>> grapevine it's gets all mangled by idiots. That's a real peeve of
>>>>>>>>> mine (can you tell?).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> "2 cups COOKED wild rice" means exactly the same as "2 cups wild
>>>>>>>> rice,
>>>>>>>> cooked". Like most people the dwarf hasn't a clue about comma
>>>>>>>> usage.
>>>>>>>> Truth is either is culinarily incorrect, wild rice is best cooked
>>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>>> the soup... but first I toast wild rice in a dry pan.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> No it doesn't, Sheldon. Go back to cooking 101.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Please tell me the difference between these then:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1 medium chopped onion
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1 medium onion, chopped
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Most people would agree that they are identical in meaning. One has
>>>>>> to
>>>>>> also penetrate into the meaning of a recipe in order to be
>>>>>> successful.
>>>>>> Some recipes lack certain information that is vital, others advocate
>>>>>> treatments that would result in underdone, overdone, flavorless, or
>>>>>> overly-seasoned food. Sometimes this isn't even the fault of the
>>>>>> recipe writer. A recipe written in Denver could easily fail at sea
>>>>>> level.
>>>>>>
>>>>> That's the same because it's a medium onion. But 2 cups of something
>>>>> uncooked is not usually the same as 2 cups of something that has
>>>>> already been cooked. If you take 2 cups of raw wild rice and cook it,
>>>>> the end result will be 6-8 cups of rice. So if the recipe is written
>>>>> as 2 cups, cooked...then it means 2 cups of raw rice, cooked. But if
>>>>> it says 2 cooked cups of wild rice then it means 2 cups of rice after
>>>>> it has been cooked. That's just basic knowledge.
>>>>
>>>> No, it's not "basic knowledge."
>>>>
>>>> What about this then:
>>>>
>>>> 1 onion, chopped
>>>>
>>>> 1 chopped onion
>>>>
>>>> By your reasoning above these indicate different things because they
>>>> don't say "medium." That makes no sense, as I hope you can see.
>>>
>>> I think we have a new suitor for Jerry Sauk over in
>>> alt.food.fast-food. Those two were made for each other.

>>
>> Maybe so. Wonder how many recipes he screws up?

>
> Just for your elucidation, I can't remember the last time I felt compelled
> to actually follow a recipe. Accomplished cooks don't need 'em and look
> at them with something of a blend of suspicion and contempt. I do read
> recipes but only to perhaps glean an idea or two. There are too many
> variables to consider and I have seen questionable recipe steps even from
> the likes of Heston Blumenthal and Jacques Pepin.
>
> Anyway I certainly wouldn't deliberately screw up a recipe (if I decided
> to use one) because I decided to misread one, as you seem to be determined
> to do.


I don't usually follow them but might refer to them for cook/bake times. I
do think they are necessary for things like baking and candy making. My
friend and I were talking about this yesterday. She said that she never
learned to cook because her mom never measured anything. Not even when
making candy. So sometimes things worked and sometimes they didn't. My
friend didn't have the money to waste all the food that her mom did due to
failed attempts.

I do however, omit steps, even in baking! I can recall a party at work
where a woman brought in some cookies that had lumps of butter not mixed in.
I couldn't believe it! Somebody warned me not to eat them but after that I
felt compelled to take one just to see why.

One step that I generally skipped was to cream the sugar and butter. In
most cases it isn't necessary. Of course if the end result should be light
and fluffy then you would. But for drop cookies? Dump it all in and mix
with your hands. I would even melt the butter, margarine or whatever so
that it would mix in better. Just let it cool some. A possible drawback of
doing it this way is that the dough will be warm. So you can't bake with it
right away. But many doughs should be chilled anyway. So I would make all
of my doughs the night before and just spend the whole next day baking. For
doughs that shouldn't be chilled, I would just take them out about two hours
before I was going to bake them.

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