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Old 15-01-2014, 07:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

This American food thing got me to thinking.

When I was trying that raw vegan diet, a guy in Australia posted that his
church had an International potluck and he had offered to bring an American
dish. Now a raw vegan diet is very restrictive and probably hardly
indicative of any one culture's cuisine to start with.

He came back from the potluck, disappointed saying that apparently
Australians just did not like American food. So we asked him what he made.
And he said he had made crackers and dip because he knew that Americans
liked to dip things. We do? Hmmm...

So we then asked, what kind of crackers and what kind of dip? Flax crackers
and a bowl of Nama Shoyu (raw soy sauce) for dipping. Now why he would
think anyone would want this combination is beyond me! I don't know how
many here have tried flax crackers. I have. They're like eating nothing.
You can feel something in your mouth but other than that there isn't a lot
of taste. Unless you have flavored them. And believe me when I tell you
that the pizza or nacho flavored ones do not taste anything like the real
things.

Several of us tried to politely point out that this was not a combination
we'd ever eat. But that fresh fruit with an avocado/chocolate type pudding
for dip or apple slices and nut butter or even raw veggies and a nacho nut
cheese or salsa would have worked. Would have been tasty and would be quite
similar to something that many Americans would eat. He just sort of laughed
it off and said, "Yeah... Right!"

I think a lot of Americans seem to think that Italians eat tons of pizza and
pasta. Sure they do eat it but not like we do here. Their meals have
several courses with pasta being but one. Can't really speak for the pizza
except that my friend said that it could be bought by the slice in the
street. So perhaps more of a lunch dish? I know that sandwiches are
popular for lunch there too.

A lot of Americans also think that the food they get in a Chinese or Mexican
restaurant is the same that they would get if they go to those countries.
Sometimes it is. But often it is more Americanized and not something even
remotely close to what you'd find there. I also know that meat and fish are
used in much smaller portions in Chinese cooking than they are here.

I've also had it drilled into me that British food is bland and boring. And
yet, I used to watch The Two Fat Ladies and the food that they made was not
that at all. In fact any of their recipes that I tried were quite good. My
dad didn't help me out any after he went there for business and came home
telling us that you have to eat little fish for breakfast. I presume that
these were kippers?

I also thought that Canadian food was the same as what we get here and much
of it is, but they have things that we don't. Like Poutine! I think some
restaurants here are now serving it but not too many.

So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?


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Old 15-01-2014, 10:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

"Julie Bove" wrote in
:

This American food thing got me to thinking.


So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?



To your point, I have a great deal of trouble taking most "Mexican" food
seriously after being directed to a couple of authentic places in San
Diego, and I'll go to "Asian" restaurants, but I don't expect the kind of
food I got during a two year stint in Asia while in the Navy.

But, like your Australian example, it definitely works both ways. I was
in Amsterdam on business once on the 4th of July, and I was staying at a
chain hotel, Marriott if I remember correctly. I made the mistake of
eating what they called "an American 4th of July meal" (it was the only
thing on the menu that day). Something that was supposed to be hot dogs,
but wasn't, something that was supposed to be potato salad, but wasn't,
and something that was supposed to be blueberry pie, but _definitely_
wasn't.
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Old 15-01-2014, 10:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.


"Alan Holbrook" wrote in message
. 3.30...
"Julie Bove" wrote in
:

This American food thing got me to thinking.


So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?



To your point, I have a great deal of trouble taking most "Mexican" food
seriously after being directed to a couple of authentic places in San
Diego, and I'll go to "Asian" restaurants, but I don't expect the kind of
food I got during a two year stint in Asia while in the Navy.

But, like your Australian example, it definitely works both ways. I was
in Amsterdam on business once on the 4th of July, and I was staying at a
chain hotel, Marriott if I remember correctly. I made the mistake of
eating what they called "an American 4th of July meal" (it was the only
thing on the menu that day). Something that was supposed to be hot dogs,
but wasn't, something that was supposed to be potato salad, but wasn't,
and something that was supposed to be blueberry pie, but _definitely_
wasn't.


Heh. I did read something like this in a book recently. I can't remember
who wrote it but they said while traveling, they kept being taken into a
separate dining room and being fed rather bland and boring food. Reason
being that these hotels and restaurants in a touristy area thought this is
what Americans wanted to eat. This was some years back. Perhaps the
1950's. They finally figured out to ask for what the staff was eating.
Only then did they get the truly local fare.

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Old 15-01-2014, 12:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

I've also had it drilled into me that British food is bland and boring.
And yet, I used to watch The Two Fat Ladies and the food that they made
was not that at all. In fact any of their recipes that I tried were quite
good.


I know, I get that here all the time) I can assure you that my food is
neither bland nor boring and I don't need to use a load of spice to make
them interesting. I think that is more about what one is used to. Our
eldest granddaughter's other grandparents and family are American and she
spends a lot of time there with them too, but she still loves my cooking and
always has requests when she visits)

My
dad didn't help me out any after he went there for business and came home
telling us that you have to eat little fish for breakfast. I presume that
these were kippers?


Well I think they are a common breakfast for some but I haven't had them in
years.

So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?


When I saw those counters of 'US food' I didn't think for one moment they
were what 'everyone' in US eats: and especially not the posters here

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

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Old 15-01-2014, 12:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.



"Alan Holbrook" wrote in message
. 3.30...
"Julie Bove" wrote in
:

This American food thing got me to thinking.


So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?



To your point, I have a great deal of trouble taking most "Mexican" food
seriously after being directed to a couple of authentic places in San
Diego, and I'll go to "Asian" restaurants, but I don't expect the kind of
food I got during a two year stint in Asia while in the Navy.

But, like your Australian example, it definitely works both ways. I was
in Amsterdam on business once on the 4th of July, and I was staying at a
chain hotel, Marriott if I remember correctly. I made the mistake of
eating what they called "an American 4th of July meal" (it was the only
thing on the menu that day). Something that was supposed to be hot dogs,
but wasn't, something that was supposed to be potato salad, but wasn't,
and something that was supposed to be blueberry pie, but _definitely_
wasn't.


Oh dear)

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/



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Old 15-01-2014, 12:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

On Wednesday, January 15, 2014 6:06:09 AM UTC-6, Ophelia wrote:
"Julie Bove" wrote in message

My dad didn't help me out any after he went there for business and came home


telling us that you have to eat little fish for breakfast. I presume that


these were kippers?


Of course, you "HAVE TO," otherwise they'll confine you in The Tower.

Well I think they are a common breakfast for some but I haven't had them in

years.

I just finished a can. First breakfast was a piece of pollock, but when I
saw kipper, I couldn't resist. Fish for breakfast, and I'm an American.

--B
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Old 15-01-2014, 01:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

On 15/01/2014 07:07, Julie Bove wrote:

So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?


I was speaking to a chap at work from the Democratic Republic of Congo
about whether he likes to eat people back home. Human Resources got
involved and made me attend a Diversity Awareness course otherwise they
were going to dismiss me. As a result, I understand first-hand how
false conceptions of what people eat can cause a lot of embarrassment.

I still have the perception that Australians eat a lot of barbecued meat
but I don't know whether it's a false one. I'm assuming that if they
do, it isn't humanoid in origin.



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Old 15-01-2014, 01:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

On Wednesday, January 15, 2014 7:28:18 AM UTC-5, Bryan-TGWWW wrote:

I just finished a can. First breakfast was a piece of pollock, but when I
saw kipper, I couldn't resist. Fish for breakfast, and I'm an American.

--B


I love kippers but have not had them for over a decade. The
best are the fresh ones (freshly smoked) not the ones in
packages. The problem is that they stink out the house.
Even if they are cooked outside, just bringing them indoors
will result in a lingering aroma. Not to mention disposal of
the bones.

Regarding ethnic food I'm almost never fooled by local
offerings. I know that it is almost impossible to get
authentic food away from the country of origin. One
exception is a superb restaurant I found in Chinatown, San
Francisco.

British food gets a bad rap, however I bet very few people outside the island know what it is. This goes doubly for Scotland.

http://www.richardfisher.com
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Old 15-01-2014, 01:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

On 15/01/2014 13:11, Helpful person wrote:

British food gets a bad rap, however I bet very few people outside
the island know what it is. This goes doubly for Scotland.


All the Americans I know who have visited here loved our food.
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Old 15-01-2014, 01:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"White Spirit" wrote in message
...
On 15/01/2014 07:07, Julie Bove wrote:

So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?


I was speaking to a chap at work from the Democratic Republic of Congo
about whether he likes to eat people back home. Human Resources got
involved and made me attend a Diversity Awareness course otherwise they
were going to dismiss me. As a result, I understand first-hand how false
conceptions of what people eat can cause a lot of embarrassment.

I still have the perception that Australians eat a lot of barbecued meat
but I don't know whether it's a false one. I'm assuming that if they do,
it isn't humanoid in origin.


Oooh please stop. I am getting squicked

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/



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Old 15-01-2014, 03:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...
This American food thing got me to thinking.

When I was trying that raw vegan diet, a guy in Australia posted that his
church had an International potluck and he had offered to bring an
American dish. Now a raw vegan diet is very restrictive and probably
hardly indicative of any one culture's cuisine to start with.

He came back from the potluck, disappointed saying that apparently
Australians just did not like American food. So we asked him what he
made. And he said he had made crackers and dip because he knew that
Americans liked to dip things. We do? Hmmm...

So we then asked, what kind of crackers and what kind of dip? Flax
crackers and a bowl of Nama Shoyu (raw soy sauce) for dipping. Now why he
would think anyone would want this combination is beyond me! I don't know
how many here have tried flax crackers. I have. They're like eating
nothing. You can feel something in your mouth but other than that there
isn't a lot of taste. Unless you have flavored them. And believe me when
I tell you that the pizza or nacho flavored ones do not taste anything
like the real things.


I like flax crackers, but I make my own for eating with tuna.

Cheri

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Old 15-01-2014, 06:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

On Wed, 15 Jan 2014 13:07:54 +0000, White Spirit wrote:

On 15/01/2014 07:07, Julie Bove wrote:

So did you have any false conceptions of foods that are eaten in other
countries? Or heard of any such things?


I was speaking to a chap at work from the Democratic Republic of Congo
about whether he likes to eat people back home. Human Resources got
involved and made me attend a Diversity Awareness course otherwise they
were going to dismiss me. As a result, I understand first-hand how false
conceptions of what people eat can cause a lot of embarrassment.

I still have the perception that Australians eat a lot of barbecued meat
but I don't know whether it's a false one. I'm assuming that if they do,
it isn't humanoid in origin.


snork Too funny.

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

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Old 15-01-2014, 09:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

Bryan-TGWWW wrote:

Fish for breakfast, and I'm an American.


BUT....you're turning Japanese, you're really turning Japanese, I
really think so.

G.
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Old 16-01-2014, 03:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

The only time I've been (mildly) surprised was when I was traveling
through Germany in 2006. We found a charming little restaurant with
outside sitting. I was very surprised to find a mozzarella cheese and
tomato salad on the menu and ordered it. It was the best I have ever
eaten! It may very well have been the ambiance of the place (an old
part of town - don't remember the town right now - our small table on
the cobblestones of the large open square - a great people watching place.)

I hadn't given it much thought until that evening, but that type of
salad in Germany just surprised me. That it was so amazingly good was
another surprise!

FTR I never had a bad meal during my almost 2 weeks in Germany, Austria
and Italy.

--
DreadfulBitch

I intend to live forever....so far, so good.
......Steven Wright
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Old 16-01-2014, 09:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default False conceptions of what other countries eat.

"Ophelia" wrote in
:



"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

I've also had it drilled into me that British food is bland and
boring. And yet, I used to watch The Two Fat Ladies and the food that
they made was not that at all. In fact any of their recipes that I
tried were quite good.


I know, I get that here all the time) I can assure you that my food
is neither bland nor boring and I don't need to use a load of spice to
make them interesting. I think that is more about what one is used
to. Our eldest granddaughter's other grandparents and family are
American and she spends a lot of time there with them too, but she
still loves my cooking and always has requests when she visits)


I was about to post how I had the same preconceived notion about British
food until I actually got to London on business and the local office folk
took me to a restaurant in Kew Garden call Jasper's Bun in the Oven. A
very enjoyable experience. I googled Jasper's and discovered that it had
been sold to a multinational, to the detriment of the food quality, I'm
sure.

And I'm also sure that anyone who thinks the British only like bland
cooking aren't aware of the national obsession for Indian and Indonesian
fare. The people in the Bristol office had a rite of passage for all
American visitors from headquarters that involved being taken to lunch at
an Indonesian place and fed something that had the word 'Dragon' in the
title. The title was well deserved...


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