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Old 18-09-2013, 11:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

Ah ha! I knew rosin baked potatoes had been discussed before here, but
it was *many* years ago:

http://bigspud.com/files/pbakedresin.htm

I just happened to be flipping through a cookbook called 'Bayou
Cuisine'. (It belonged to my mother, probably given to her. She wasn't
particularly interested in cooking.)

Anyway, it says to melt 10-15 lbs. of rosin/resin in a deep cast iron
kettle. When melted and bubbling lightly drop in potatoes of medium to
large size. After 45 minutes to an hour the potatoes rise to the
surface and are cooked another 15 minutes. Remove with iron tongs and
place on a piece of heavy butcher paper, or newspaper, which is twisted
around it to form a jacket. Cut through the paper and potato and serve
it topped with butter, salt & pepper.

So, they aren't really "baked", they're boiled in pine rosin/resin. I
remember having one of these "baked" potatoes these *many* years ago at
Cracker Barrel.

I wouldn't have any idea where to buy pine rosin/resin if I were so
inclined to make something like this. Still, it's an interesting
cooking concept.

Jill

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Old 19-09-2013, 12:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 18:14:41 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

Ah ha! I knew rosin baked potatoes had been discussed before here, but
it was *many* years ago:

http://bigspud.com/files/pbakedresin.htm

I just happened to be flipping through a cookbook called 'Bayou
Cuisine'. (It belonged to my mother, probably given to her. She wasn't
particularly interested in cooking.)

Anyway, it says to melt 10-15 lbs. of rosin/resin in a deep cast iron
kettle. When melted and bubbling lightly drop in potatoes of medium to
large size. After 45 minutes to an hour the potatoes rise to the
surface and are cooked another 15 minutes. Remove with iron tongs and
place on a piece of heavy butcher paper, or newspaper, which is twisted
around it to form a jacket. Cut through the paper and potato and serve
it topped with butter, salt & pepper.

So, they aren't really "baked", they're boiled in pine rosin/resin. I
remember having one of these "baked" potatoes these *many* years ago at
Cracker Barrel.

I wouldn't have any idea where to buy pine rosin/resin if I were so
inclined to make something like this. Still, it's an interesting
cooking concept.

Jill


My father said he used to bake potatoes in mud, years ago when he was
a kid. He'llbe 96 this Jan!!

Infer what you will from that! :-)

John Kuthe...
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Old 19-09-2013, 02:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On 9/18/13 7:33 PM, John Kuthe wrote:

My father said he used to bake potatoes in mud, years ago when he was
a kid. He'llbe 96 this Jan!!

Infer what you will from that! :-)


Cooking all sorts of things in mud or clay over a bed of hot coals used
to be a regular Boy Scout method in the 50s and 60s.

-- Larry

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Old 19-09-2013, 04:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes


"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Ah ha! I knew rosin baked potatoes had been discussed before here, but it
was *many* years ago:

http://bigspud.com/files/pbakedresin.htm

I just happened to be flipping through a cookbook called 'Bayou Cuisine'.
(It belonged to my mother, probably given to her. She wasn't particularly
interested in cooking.)

Anyway, it says to melt 10-15 lbs. of rosin/resin in a deep cast iron
kettle. When melted and bubbling lightly drop in potatoes of medium to
large size. After 45 minutes to an hour the potatoes rise to the surface
and are cooked another 15 minutes. Remove with iron tongs and place on a
piece of heavy butcher paper, or newspaper, which is twisted around it to
form a jacket. Cut through the paper and potato and serve it topped with
butter, salt & pepper.

So, they aren't really "baked", they're boiled in pine rosin/resin. I
remember having one of these "baked" potatoes these *many* years ago at
Cracker Barrel.

I wouldn't have any idea where to buy pine rosin/resin if I were so
inclined to make something like this. Still, it's an interesting cooking
concept.

Jill


Sounds like it would be expensive! Cakes of rosin are used for violin bows,
but that would be too small. Powdered rosin is used for gymnasts and
dancers.

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Old 19-09-2013, 07:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 18:14:41 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

Ah ha! I knew rosin baked potatoes had been discussed before here, but
it was *many* years ago:

http://bigspud.com/files/pbakedresin.htm

I just happened to be flipping through a cookbook called 'Bayou
Cuisine'. (It belonged to my mother, probably given to her. She wasn't
particularly interested in cooking.)

Anyway, it says to melt 10-15 lbs. of rosin/resin in a deep cast iron
kettle. When melted and bubbling lightly drop in potatoes of medium to
large size. After 45 minutes to an hour the potatoes rise to the
surface and are cooked another 15 minutes. Remove with iron tongs and
place on a piece of heavy butcher paper, or newspaper, which is twisted
around it to form a jacket. Cut through the paper and potato and serve
it topped with butter, salt & pepper.

So, they aren't really "baked", they're boiled in pine rosin/resin. I
remember having one of these "baked" potatoes these *many* years ago at
Cracker Barrel.

I wouldn't have any idea where to buy pine rosin/resin if I were so
inclined to make something like this. Still, it's an interesting
cooking concept.


No idea what rosin is, but that won't stop me from thinking this
concept sounds absolutely terrible. How do you bake an item when it
is being boiled? Seeing that a "Cracker Barrel" recipe is #2 on the
Google hit list doesn't make it any better.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


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Old 19-09-2013, 02:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On 9/19/2013 2:03 AM, sf wrote:
On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 18:14:41 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

Ah ha! I knew rosin baked potatoes had been discussed before here, but
it was *many* years ago:

http://bigspud.com/files/pbakedresin.htm

I just happened to be flipping through a cookbook called 'Bayou
Cuisine'. (It belonged to my mother, probably given to her. She wasn't
particularly interested in cooking.)

Anyway, it says to melt 10-15 lbs. of rosin/resin in a deep cast iron
kettle. When melted and bubbling lightly drop in potatoes of medium to
large size. After 45 minutes to an hour the potatoes rise to the
surface and are cooked another 15 minutes. Remove with iron tongs and
place on a piece of heavy butcher paper, or newspaper, which is twisted
around it to form a jacket. Cut through the paper and potato and serve
it topped with butter, salt & pepper.

So, they aren't really "baked", they're boiled in pine rosin/resin. I
remember having one of these "baked" potatoes these *many* years ago at
Cracker Barrel.

I wouldn't have any idea where to buy pine rosin/resin if I were so
inclined to make something like this. Still, it's an interesting
cooking concept.


No idea what rosin is, but that won't stop me from thinking this
concept sounds absolutely terrible. How do you bake an item when it
is being boiled? Seeing that a "Cracker Barrel" recipe is #2 on the
Google hit list doesn't make it any better.

It's pine resin/sap. Obviously the potatoes aren't "baked", but they're
served like bake potatoes. Split open, add butter, sour cream if
desired. You don't eat the skin, which is covered with paper.

Jill
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Old 19-09-2013, 03:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 23:03:02 -0700, sf wrote:
snip

No idea what rosin is, but that won't stop me from thinking this
concept sounds absolutely terrible. How do you bake an item when it
is being boiled? Seeing that a "Cracker Barrel" recipe is #2 on the
Google hit list doesn't make it any better.


rosin is what violinists rub on the bow hairs to make the bow grab the
strings. It's what ballet dancers put on the toes of their shoes.
What weight lifters put on their hands. Gymnasts put it on their
hands, etc., etc., etc. It's that white powdered stuff, used for its
sticky properties.
Janet US
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Old 19-09-2013, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On Thu, 19 Sep 2013 08:10:57 -0600, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 23:03:02 -0700, sf wrote:
snip

No idea what rosin is, but that won't stop me from thinking this
concept sounds absolutely terrible. How do you bake an item when it
is being boiled? Seeing that a "Cracker Barrel" recipe is #2 on the
Google hit list doesn't make it any better.


rosin is what violinists rub on the bow hairs to make the bow grab the
strings. It's what ballet dancers put on the toes of their shoes.
What weight lifters put on their hands. Gymnasts put it on their
hands, etc., etc., etc. It's that white powdered stuff, used for its
sticky properties.

That's what I thought, then I looked it up and confirmed - which makes
the recipe even worse - stomach turning in fact.


--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 19-09-2013, 09:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On 9/19/2013 4:10 AM, Janet Bostwick wrote:
On Wed, 18 Sep 2013 23:03:02 -0700, sf wrote:
snip

No idea what rosin is, but that won't stop me from thinking this
concept sounds absolutely terrible. How do you bake an item when it
is being boiled? Seeing that a "Cracker Barrel" recipe is #2 on the
Google hit list doesn't make it any better.


rosin is what violinists rub on the bow hairs to make the bow grab the
strings. It's what ballet dancers put on the toes of their shoes.
What weight lifters put on their hands. Gymnasts put it on their
hands, etc., etc., etc. It's that white powdered stuff, used for its
sticky properties.
Janet US

Rosin is also used in electronics as a soldering flux. For the last 25
years, every time I use the soldering iron, I get a whiff of rosin
vapor. I think that a potato cooked in the stuff would make me barf.
Violently.
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Old 23-09-2013, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rosin/Resin Baked Potatoes

On 9/18/2013 5:14 PM, jmcquown wrote:
Ah ha! I knew rosin baked potatoes had been discussed before here,
but it was *many* years ago:

http://bigspud.com/files/pbakedresin.htm

I just happened to be flipping through a cookbook called 'Bayou
Cuisine'. (It belonged to my mother, probably given to her. She
wasn't particularly interested in cooking.)

Anyway, it says to melt 10-15 lbs. of rosin/resin in a deep cast iron
kettle. When melted and bubbling lightly drop in potatoes of medium
to large size. After 45 minutes to an hour the potatoes rise to the
surface and are cooked another 15 minutes. Remove with iron tongs and
place on a piece of heavy butcher paper, or newspaper, which is
twisted around it to form a jacket. Cut through the paper and potato
and serve it topped with butter, salt & pepper.

So, they aren't really "baked", they're boiled in pine rosin/resin. I
remember having one of these "baked" potatoes these *many* years ago
at Cracker Barrel.

I wouldn't have any idea where to buy pine rosin/resin if I were so
inclined to make something like this. Still, it's an interesting
cooking concept.


I first read about resin potatoes in the Joy of Cooking. The LA Times
has that recipe online:

http://articles.latimes.com/1990-02-...fo-677_1_rosin



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