General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-03-2013, 09:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

Look, no noodles! And yes, eggs in this... whatever the heck this is.

The recipe appears to be a collaborative effort by Mrs. A. Hamilton
Evans, Mrs. W. R. Puckett and Mrs. Robert H. Richards. (Notice women of
that era didn't have their own first names. LOL)

Chicken 'N Stuffing Scallop
(Uh oh.) With Pimento Mushroom Sauce

1 8-oz. pkg. seasoned stuffing
3 c. chicken, cubed
1/2 c. butter, melted
1/2 c. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
dash of pepper
4 c. chicken broth, cool
6 eggs, beaten

Prepare stuffing according to package directions for dry stuffing.
Spread in a 13X9X2 baking dish. Place chicken on top. Blend flour and
seasoning into butter; add broth. Stir over low heat until mixture
thickens. Stir in 1-2 Tablespoons of hot mixture into eggs; return to
broth. Pour broth over chicken; bake at 325 degrees 40-45 minutes until
firm. Cool slightly; cut in squares. Serve with pimento mushroom sauce.

Pimento Mushroom Sauce:

1 can condensed mushroom soup
1/4 c. milk
1 c. sour cream
1/4 c. pimento, chopped

Combine all ingredients; stir over low heat until hot. Pour sauce over
squares of chicken. Yield: 12 servings

Okay... what sounds wrong here? "Squares of chicken" jumped right off
the page It also appears the people who edited the 'Recipes on
Parade' cookbooks were extremely fond of semi-colons.

Jill

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 02:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 8,778
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

On 3/18/2013 5:56 PM, jmcquown wrote:
Look, no noodles! And yes, eggs in this... whatever the heck this is.

The recipe appears to be a collaborative effort by Mrs. A. Hamilton
Evans, Mrs. W. R. Puckett and Mrs. Robert H. Richards. (Notice women of
that era didn't have their own first names. LOL)

Chicken 'N Stuffing Scallop
(Uh oh.) With Pimento Mushroom Sauce

1 8-oz. pkg. seasoned stuffing
3 c. chicken, cubed
1/2 c. butter, melted
1/2 c. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
dash of pepper
4 c. chicken broth, cool
6 eggs, beaten

Prepare stuffing according to package directions for dry stuffing.
Spread in a 13X9X2 baking dish. Place chicken on top. Blend flour and
seasoning into butter; add broth. Stir over low heat until mixture
thickens. Stir in 1-2 Tablespoons of hot mixture into eggs; return to
broth. Pour broth over chicken; bake at 325 degrees 40-45 minutes until
firm. Cool slightly; cut in squares. Serve with pimento mushroom sauce.

Pimento Mushroom Sauce:

1 can condensed mushroom soup
1/4 c. milk
1 c. sour cream
1/4 c. pimento, chopped

Combine all ingredients; stir over low heat until hot. Pour sauce over
squares of chicken. Yield: 12 servings

Okay... what sounds wrong here? "Squares of chicken" jumped right off
the page It also appears the people who edited the 'Recipes on
Parade' cookbooks were extremely fond of semi-colons.

Jill


Looks like we're both having fun looking through our old cookbooks.
Here's one called Frozen Chicken Salad. Can I say disgusting this time
without questioned about it? lol

http://oi45.tinypic.com/351sj8i.jpg

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 03:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

On Mon, 18 Mar 2013 22:51:28 -0400, Cheryl
wrote:

Looks like we're both having fun looking through our old cookbooks.
Here's one called Frozen Chicken Salad. Can I say disgusting this time
without questioned about it? lol

http://oi45.tinypic.com/351sj8i.jpg


To be perfectly honest, it looks like it would fit in with other
chicken salad recipe of the times... until they decided to freeze it.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 05:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

jmcquown wrote:
Look, no noodles! And yes, eggs in this... whatever the heck this is.

The recipe appears to be a collaborative effort by Mrs. A. Hamilton
Evans, Mrs. W. R. Puckett and Mrs. Robert H. Richards. (Notice women
of that era didn't have their own first names. LOL)

Chicken 'N Stuffing Scallop
(Uh oh.) With Pimento Mushroom Sauce

1 8-oz. pkg. seasoned stuffing
3 c. chicken, cubed
1/2 c. butter, melted
1/2 c. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
dash of pepper
4 c. chicken broth, cool
6 eggs, beaten

Prepare stuffing according to package directions for dry stuffing.
Spread in a 13X9X2 baking dish. Place chicken on top. Blend flour
and seasoning into butter; add broth. Stir over low heat until
mixture thickens. Stir in 1-2 Tablespoons of hot mixture into eggs;
return to broth. Pour broth over chicken; bake at 325 degrees 40-45
minutes until firm. Cool slightly; cut in squares. Serve with
pimento mushroom sauce.
Pimento Mushroom Sauce:

1 can condensed mushroom soup
1/4 c. milk
1 c. sour cream
1/4 c. pimento, chopped

Combine all ingredients; stir over low heat until hot. Pour sauce
over squares of chicken. Yield: 12 servings

Okay... what sounds wrong here? "Squares of chicken" jumped right off
the page It also appears the people who edited the 'Recipes on
Parade' cookbooks were extremely fond of semi-colons.

Jill


I think I have seen this recipe before but was not tempted to try it. I
have made a stuffing casserole. It was my own recipe. There was no cream
of anything in it though.

I also think that in the old days it was a lot more common to use semi
colons. I say this because when I transferred my first novel to Word on my
computer, I kept getting indications of typos. Kept telling me that I
needed semi colons. So I put them in. Then I tried reading through it.
And realized that it looked really stupid. Novels do not read like that.
Once in a while you'll see a semi colon but it wasn't anything nearly like
what mind looked like. I wound up never changing it. Would be too much of
a PITA to go through it and remove them all. Maybe one day when I have
literally nothing better to do. Subsequent versions of Word do not do this.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 05:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

Cheryl wrote:
On 3/18/2013 5:56 PM, jmcquown wrote:
Look, no noodles! And yes, eggs in this... whatever the heck this
is. The recipe appears to be a collaborative effort by Mrs. A. Hamilton
Evans, Mrs. W. R. Puckett and Mrs. Robert H. Richards. (Notice
women of that era didn't have their own first names. LOL)

Chicken 'N Stuffing Scallop
(Uh oh.) With Pimento Mushroom Sauce

1 8-oz. pkg. seasoned stuffing
3 c. chicken, cubed
1/2 c. butter, melted
1/2 c. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
dash of pepper
4 c. chicken broth, cool
6 eggs, beaten

Prepare stuffing according to package directions for dry stuffing.
Spread in a 13X9X2 baking dish. Place chicken on top. Blend flour
and seasoning into butter; add broth. Stir over low heat until
mixture thickens. Stir in 1-2 Tablespoons of hot mixture into eggs;
return to broth. Pour broth over chicken; bake at 325 degrees 40-45
minutes until firm. Cool slightly; cut in squares. Serve with
pimento mushroom sauce. Pimento Mushroom Sauce:

1 can condensed mushroom soup
1/4 c. milk
1 c. sour cream
1/4 c. pimento, chopped

Combine all ingredients; stir over low heat until hot. Pour sauce
over squares of chicken. Yield: 12 servings

Okay... what sounds wrong here? "Squares of chicken" jumped right
off the page It also appears the people who edited the 'Recipes
on Parade' cookbooks were extremely fond of semi-colons.

Jill


Looks like we're both having fun looking through our old cookbooks.
Here's one called Frozen Chicken Salad. Can I say disgusting this
time without questioned about it? lol

http://oi45.tinypic.com/351sj8i.jpg


I don't know what cookbook that is from but I either had it or maybe still
do. I made the chicken hash and remember seeing the Mock Terrapin Stew.
Would have made the creamed chicken but didn't know what that meant to serve
it. Ring or croustades?




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 05:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 8,778
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

On 3/19/2013 12:59 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought this magazine at a used book store just for this recipe. It
was published the same month I was born. What's scary is that I think
I have all the ingredients to make this (if I use tomato sauce inseatd
of tomato juice). Can anybody help me with the, "garnish with
poinsettia flowers of pimiento and green pepper."?

Holiday Buffet Loaf
Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.

Mrs. J.C Grigsby, Lehigh Acres, Florida, says this is a dish she
serves often for bridge luncheons. With it she serves fruit
salad, celery and carrot sticks.

Green Layer:
---------------------------------
1 package lime-flavored gelatin
1 cup boiling water
3/4 cup ice
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vinegar
1 cup grated cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery

Disolve gelatin in hot water. Add cold water, salt, and vinegar.
Chill until slightly thickened. Add vegetables and pour into
mold. Chill until firm.

Red Layer
------------------------------------
1-1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
1/2 cup cold water
1 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon onion juice
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups ground cooked turkey

Soak gelatin in cold water. Heat tomato juice; add gelatin and
stir until completely dissolved. Chill until slightly thickened.
Fold in seasonings and turkey. Put mixture over green layer and
chill until firm. Unmold and garnish with poinsettia flowers of
pimiento and green pepper.

Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.

I guess they want you to make the center of the flower out of pimento
and the petals with green pepper. That doesn't appeal to me one bit.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 06:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
I bought this magazine at a used book store just for this recipe. It
was published the same month I was born. What's scary is that I think
I have all the ingredients to make this (if I use tomato sauce inseatd
of tomato juice). Can anybody help me with the, "garnish with
poinsettia flowers of pimiento and green pepper."?

Holiday Buffet Loaf
Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.

Mrs. J.C Grigsby, Lehigh Acres, Florida, says this is a dish she
serves often for bridge luncheons. With it she serves fruit
salad, celery and carrot sticks.

Green Layer:
---------------------------------
1 package lime-flavored gelatin
1 cup boiling water
3/4 cup ice
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vinegar
1 cup grated cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery

Disolve gelatin in hot water. Add cold water, salt, and vinegar.
Chill until slightly thickened. Add vegetables and pour into
mold. Chill until firm.

Red Layer
------------------------------------
1-1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
1/2 cup cold water
1 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon onion juice
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups ground cooked turkey

Soak gelatin in cold water. Heat tomato juice; add gelatin and
stir until completely dissolved. Chill until slightly thickened.
Fold in seasonings and turkey. Put mixture over green layer and
chill until firm. Unmold and garnish with poinsettia flowers of
pimiento and green pepper.

Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.


Uh... That one made me want to hurl! I did do Jell-O with chopped raw
veggies in it while pregnant but I can't remember why now. Must have been
some reason. I do remember having a couple of trays of little cups in the
fridge. One was the Jell-O and the other was a combination of Jell-O,
Jell-O pudding and assorted berries that had been cooked in the stuff. I
know that doing the berries like that was an attempt to get me to eat them.
Because I don't really like fruit. And I didn't really like those either.
So I didn't make those for long. And I eventually gave up on eating the
fruit. Didn't seem to have affected Angela any. Dietician said she would
suffer if I didn't eat 5 pieces of fruit daily. Most days I did manage to
eat one. Or at least part of one.

Do they even make onion juice any more? And what would you use it for?
Aside from this recipe that is...


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 06:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!


"Cheryl" wrote in message
b.com...
On 3/19/2013 12:59 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought this magazine at a used book store just for this recipe. It
was published the same month I was born. What's scary is that I think
I have all the ingredients to make this (if I use tomato sauce inseatd
of tomato juice). Can anybody help me with the, "garnish with
poinsettia flowers of pimiento and green pepper."?

Holiday Buffet Loaf
Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.

Mrs. J.C Grigsby, Lehigh Acres, Florida, says this is a dish she
serves often for bridge luncheons. With it she serves fruit
salad, celery and carrot sticks.

Green Layer:
---------------------------------
1 package lime-flavored gelatin
1 cup boiling water
3/4 cup ice
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vinegar
1 cup grated cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery

Disolve gelatin in hot water. Add cold water, salt, and vinegar.
Chill until slightly thickened. Add vegetables and pour into
mold. Chill until firm.

Red Layer
------------------------------------
1-1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
1/2 cup cold water
1 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon onion juice
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups ground cooked turkey

Soak gelatin in cold water. Heat tomato juice; add gelatin and
stir until completely dissolved. Chill until slightly thickened.
Fold in seasonings and turkey. Put mixture over green layer and
chill until firm. Unmold and garnish with poinsettia flowers of
pimiento and green pepper.

Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.

I guess they want you to make the center of the flower out of pimento and
the petals with green pepper. That doesn't appeal to me one bit.


They used a lot of pimentos in the old days. And slices of green stuffed
olives.


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 10:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,587
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

On 2013-03-19, Sqwertz wrote:

Green Layer:
---------------------------------
1 package lime-flavored gelatin


1 cup grated cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery


Red Layer
------------------------------------
1-1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin


1 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon onion juice
2 cups ground cooked turkey


Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.


Doesn't sound at all outta line with those times. JellO molds were
insanely popular in the 50s and early 60s. I literally grew up on
them. Raw green veggies like celery and cabbage and even cottage
cheese in a lime JellO were classic everyday standards and not
uncommon in restaurants. By the late 60s, they were pretty much a
done deal, rebellious youth having protested that food trend into
obscure history. JellO does not make for a good munchie.`

Concerning the above recipe, I'd try it --once-- though I'm at a loss
as to how one goes about juicing an onion. Didn't someone make a
little plastic bottle of onion juice shaped kinda like an onion, the
plastic cap coming to a curved point, like an onion sprout? My geezer
brain struggles with some such memory.

What I find fascinating is that Southern Living Magazine goes back
that far. I had no idea.

nb
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 11:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!


"notbob" wrote in message
...
On 2013-03-19, Sqwertz wrote:

Green Layer:
---------------------------------
1 package lime-flavored gelatin


1 cup grated cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery


Red Layer
------------------------------------
1-1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin


1 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon onion juice
2 cups ground cooked turkey


Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.


Doesn't sound at all outta line with those times. JellO molds were
insanely popular in the 50s and early 60s. I literally grew up on
them. Raw green veggies like celery and cabbage and even cottage
cheese in a lime JellO were classic everyday standards and not
uncommon in restaurants. By the late 60s, they were pretty much a
done deal, rebellious youth having protested that food trend into
obscure history. JellO does not make for a good munchie.`

Concerning the above recipe, I'd try it --once-- though I'm at a loss
as to how one goes about juicing an onion. Didn't someone make a
little plastic bottle of onion juice shaped kinda like an onion, the
plastic cap coming to a curved point, like an onion sprout? My geezer
brain struggles with some such memory.

What I find fascinating is that Southern Living Magazine goes back
that far. I had no idea.

nb


My maternal grandma was big into copper stuff. She had the Revereware
copper bottomed pans. She was very proud of them and polished the bottoms
after every use. She also had a collection of copper Jell-O molds. I am
not sure if she actually used them or not. They hung on the wall and we
were not allowed to touch them. I do remember her being really big on
Jell-O salads though so she might have.

My mom said that Jell-O was quite a big deal when she was a kid. I could be
wrong on this but I think refrigerators were being made in those days but
most people still did not have them. They only had the ice box. So in
order to make the Jell-O, it had to be done when there was snow outside.
The bowl would be set in the snow so it would set up. Otherwise they could
set it out on the back porch on a cold day and hope for the best.

When I was a kid, my mom made Jell-O a lot. Not really sure why but she did
seem fond of it. She really liked to do the quick set method with the ice.
And for some reason that appealed to me. I liked to stir in the cubes and
watch it set up.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 12:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 23,520
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

Julie Bove wrote:

My maternal grandma was big into copper stuff. She had the Revereware
copper bottomed pans. She was very proud of them and polished the bottoms
after every use.


She had a lot of spare time then. I have and use the Revereware copper
bottom cookware almost exclusively. I've got 3 frying pans (3 sizes), 6
sauce pans (4 different sizes) and two larger pots...a 5qt and an 8qt. All
with the interchangeable lids.

I tried once to keep the copper bottoms clean. Yeah right! All of mine now
have nicely seasoned black bottoms hiding that nifty copper.

G.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 12:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

On 3/19/2013 6:14 AM, notbob wrote:
On 2013-03-19, Sqwertz wrote:

Green Layer:
---------------------------------
1 package lime-flavored gelatin


1 cup grated cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1/2 cup chopped celery


Red Layer
------------------------------------
1-1/2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin


1 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon onion juice
2 cups ground cooked turkey


Source: Southern Living magazine, July 1967.


Doesn't sound at all outta line with those times. JellO molds were
insanely popular in the 50s and early 60s. I literally grew up on
them. Raw green veggies like celery and cabbage and even cottage
cheese in a lime JellO were classic everyday standards and not
uncommon in restaurants. By the late 60s, they were pretty much a
done deal, rebellious youth having protested that food trend into
obscure history. JellO does not make for a good munchie.`

Concerning the above recipe, I'd try it --once-- though I'm at a loss
as to how one goes about juicing an onion. Didn't someone make a
little plastic bottle of onion juice shaped kinda like an onion, the
plastic cap coming to a curved point, like an onion sprout? My geezer
brain struggles with some such memory.

What I find fascinating is that Southern Living Magazine goes back
that far. I had no idea.

nb

Yes, onion juice came in a bottle shaped like an onion. I may have even
bought it once although I don't recall why. A quick google search shows
you can buy onion juice but it's not in a cute onion-shaped bottle anymore.

Jill
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 12:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!

On 3/19/2013 7:43 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
My maternal grandma was big into copper stuff. She had the Revereware
copper bottomed pans. She was very proud of them and polished the bottoms
after every use. She also had a collection of copper Jell-O molds. I am
not sure if she actually used them or not. They hung on the wall and we
were not allowed to touch them. I do remember her being really big on
Jell-O salads though so she might have.


Both my aunt and my mother had the Revereware. (Actually, so do I.) My
aunt polished the copper bottoms religiously. My mother didn't and I
don't bother, either.

Mom had the copper Jell-O molds (and yes, I recall her using them). She
gave them to me over 20 years ago. They're hanging on the wall above
the cabinets in kitchen.

Jill
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 12:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!


"Gary" wrote in message ...
Julie Bove wrote:

My maternal grandma was big into copper stuff. She had the Revereware
copper bottomed pans. She was very proud of them and polished the
bottoms
after every use.


She had a lot of spare time then. I have and use the Revereware copper
bottom cookware almost exclusively. I've got 3 frying pans (3 sizes), 6
sauce pans (4 different sizes) and two larger pots...a 5qt and an 8qt.
All
with the interchangeable lids.

I tried once to keep the copper bottoms clean. Yeah right! All of mine
now
have nicely seasoned black bottoms hiding that nifty copper.

G.


My first set of pans was crap. Enamel but they matched my Corelle. Didn't
last any time at all. They chipped horribly. I replaced them with another
cheaper set of enamel. No lids came with this set and I think it was
something like $3.99 for the three pans. They did chip eventually but not
in the area where the food would touch while it was cooking. I did keep
those for a while after I got the Revere but mainly only used them for craft
projects and such.

I always get rid of any Revere frying pan that comes in the set. I did try
them but the food always stuck. I don't really fry much anyway so no
biggie. I did polish the bottoms weekly at first. Then monthly. Then my
friend said I could use ketchup on them. I did try it. It did work but
then I thought... Why am I doing this? And for the most part I stopped.
Once in a while I'd make a half assed attempt at polishing them.

I lost my most used 2 Qt. pan due to a freak accident with an old stove.
Heard a noise like a Piccolo Pete firework going off. Looked into the
kitchen to see blue sparks shooting from the stove. They charred a bit of
the ceiling but luckily no fire. Then an explosion! What happened was that
the outside tip of the electrical burner shot off and shot a hole clear
through the pan. I was boiling some pasta at the time. Water went
everywhere! What a mess! Landlord apologized to me and repaired the stove.
I was just lucky to have been in the other room when it happened!

Brother replaced the pan for me for my birthday but he bought me a double
boiler. It was actually just the same pan but with an insertable metal
bowl. I have never used it much as a double boiler but I do use the bowl
from time to time.

I had put my pans in the dishwasher and this made the handles go all dull.
And some of the handles got loose. So I decided to replace the set. But
for some reason the 2 Qt. was not included. So I had to buy that
separately. I did keep the old 2 Qt. and use it for making popcorn. I also
kept all of the lids. They changed the configuration if you will of the
pans now. So all of the lids do fit something. Just maybe not the same pan
they once fit.

Then I made the comment to my mom about all the extra lids that I had. She
just heard "lid" and thought that I needed lids. So she bought me this
horkingly huge universal pan lid. I've never used it.

I had a Rachael Ray pasta pot that I loved but parts of it began to show
signs of wear. I replaced it a few months ago. They have taken care of the
problems I had with it with a redesign. I also had a Circulon pan which I
loved but I think I destroyed it with pan spray. I replaced it and also got
another. Have a big skillet that daughter bought me as a present and also
an Orgreenic pan.

But mostly when I use the stove, I still use the old 2 Qt. I just made some
rice in it. I don't use the proper lid though. I got one of those Kuhn
Rikon things to prevent boil overs. I have a red one and just got a purple
one too. Size large. Really want an extra large as well but I think they
quit making that size. I use that pan so much that I just keep it on the
burner of the stove.


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2013, 12:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Another 1960's Casserole - fun!


"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Yes, onion juice came in a bottle shaped like an onion. I may have even
bought it once although I don't recall why. A quick google search shows
you can buy onion juice but it's not in a cute onion-shaped bottle
anymore.

Jill


I remember the onion bottle. I had two teachers in elementary school that
were roommates. They were constantly playing practical jokes on each other.
And they'd tell us what they did. One claimed that he used the onion juice
in the other one's coffee cup. Said that when it dried, you couldn't tell.
So that when Mr. H. put his coffee in there, he'd get a nasty surprise. We
kids talked about this and none of us could believe this would actually
work. I did look for the stuff at the store. That's when I saw the bottle.
But my mom wouldn't let me buy it. I wanted to try this trick on my dad.
But I didn't want to do it badly enough to spend my allowance on it.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gotta Love 1960's Ads for Products jmcquown[_2_] General Cooking 11 04-02-2014 03:02 AM
And Another 1960's Recipe jmcquown[_2_] General Cooking 23 24-03-2013 02:20 AM
FA: Old 1960's/70's Cooking Books Paul Miller General Cooking 9 14-04-2006 11:11 PM
FA: Old 1960's/70's Cooking Books Paul Miller Historic 0 14-04-2006 07:28 PM
FA:Robertsons Golly Badge Cricketer 1960's (?) David Harris Marketplace 0 10-05-2004 09:33 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017