General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 09:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,946
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!



"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On 3/14/2013 12:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:

Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of course
does both central heating and hot water


My step-mother said that the houses in her town (Gothenburg?) was heated
by water coming in from a hot water factory and distributed by underground
pipes. That was the nuttiest thing that I ever heard. Those Swedes!


I saw that in Lincoln (UK)! About 30 years ago, a woman I knew moved into a
house on a new estate and all the houses were served by a central boiler
Never heard of it since though and I haven't been there for many years, so I
don't know if it is still in operation.

--
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 09:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,946
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!



"S Viemeister" wrote in message
...
On 3/14/2013 6:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:

Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of course
does both central heating and hot water

Ours looks different, but it's an oil-fired, _externally_ mounted unit,
with masses of insulation and a weatherproof casing.


Ours is in a cupboard inside the house - on an outside wall though. (Oh
yes, and it uses gas)

--
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 09:57 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,854
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!

On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 14:09:27 +0800, JBurns
wrote:




Not a feel good thing here. When you have three adults, 2 teenage boys
and two little girls in your household a storage tank hot water system
is just not going to cut it when everyone wants a morning shower.


Sure it will, if you have the correct setup. In my house you can take
two showers at a time and do that and more. It is a System 2000 by
Energy Kinetics.
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 10:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,854
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!

On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 03:28:12 +0000 (UTC), gregz
wrote:




I don't like the term boiler unless it's really a boiler for steam heat.
That's the only time it boils. Water heaters are not boilers, although I've
seen that happen when they build up stuff in the bottom.

Greg


Like it or not, that is the terminology used all over the world by the
manufacturers and the engineers that design them.

Some boilers will do either, heat water or make steam, depending on
the controls.
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 10:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,854
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!

On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:24:31 -0700, sf wrote:



Right.
Furnaces heat air, boilers heat water. The terms are often used
incorrectly.


YES! I know old public buildings and some super old apartment
buildings (and those converted to condos) still operate with a boiler
system - but come on... single family HOUSES? The only "modern"
heating water source I know about is fed by the water heater, not a
boiler (mid-century modern Eichler houses and modern bathrooms with a
floor heating system in the floor).


As I said, if it heats water, the term used for the device is a
boiler. They range from smallish units for the house to large
industrial sized 100 HP units in industrial or commercial settings. If
you go to a 3000 room hotel in Las Vegas, chances are the domestic hot
water for you shower is heated by a big Cleaver Brooks boiler.


Define the parameters if it's not
a single family house, which is what I think most of the people here
were talking about in generalized terms. I don't know enough about a
whole building boiler systems to know if hot water from a faucet comes
from the same place that provides heat to the buildings or not. What
I do know is that boiler systems are not commonly used in single
family housing here... like Aga stoves, they are out of the ordinary.


If they are heating water, it is a boiler. Sorry, but that is the
proper term. Single family to big apartment complex, boilers heat the
water. In smaller units like the house, they do both the heating and
the domestic water.
http://www.weil-mclain.com/en/weil-mclain/pc-boilers/

You will see units that do both.
http://www.weil-mclain.com/en/weil-m...ue-gas-boiler/
•Gas fired water boiler with cast aluminum heat exchanger
•Venturi mixing body mixes air and gas providing higher efficiency
•Designed to operate in low temperature condensing applications
•Outdoor reset and domestic hot water priority standard

I don't know what is common in your town, but they are very common in
the cooler climates. Millions of residential boilers exist. Probably
80% of the homes in New England have boilers. A few still have steam.





  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 12:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,855
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'mIn Hot Water!

On 3/15/2013 5:48 AM, Ophelia wrote:


"S Viemeister" wrote in message
...
On 3/14/2013 6:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:

Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of course
does both central heating and hot water

Ours looks different, but it's an oil-fired, _externally_ mounted unit,
with masses of insulation and a weatherproof casing.


Ours is in a cupboard inside the house - on an outside wall though. (Oh
yes, and it uses gas)

Our house is small, and I wanted to recover the space used by the old
system - also, after having had a chimney fire, and cleaning soot off
_everything_, I decided an outside boiler was a very good idea!
If mains gas were available, I'd have used that, but it's not likely to
ever reach us, and we already had the oil tank.
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 12:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,946
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!



"S Viemeister" wrote in message
...

Ours is in a cupboard inside the house - on an outside wall though. (Oh
yes, and it uses gas)

Our house is small, and I wanted to recover the space used by the old
system - also, after having had a chimney fire, and cleaning soot off
_everything_, I decided an outside boiler was a very good idea!


That would certainly concentrate the mind!!!

If mains gas were available, I'd have used that, but it's not likely to
ever reach us, and we already had the oil tank.


We have only oil at the cottage, and we have a boiler with hot water tank
which serves the radiators and hot water. Maybe one day ...

--
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 01:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,807
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!

On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 06:11:23 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:24:31 -0700, sf wrote:



Right.
Furnaces heat air, boilers heat water. The terms are often used
incorrectly.


YES! I know old public buildings and some super old apartment
buildings (and those converted to condos) still operate with a boiler
system - but come on... single family HOUSES? The only "modern"
heating water source I know about is fed by the water heater, not a
boiler (mid-century modern Eichler houses and modern bathrooms with a
floor heating system in the floor).


As I said, if it heats water, the term used for the device is a
boiler. They range from smallish units for the house to large
industrial sized 100 HP units in industrial or commercial settings. If
you go to a 3000 room hotel in Las Vegas, chances are the domestic hot
water for you shower is heated by a big Cleaver Brooks boiler.


Define the parameters if it's not
a single family house, which is what I think most of the people here
were talking about in generalized terms. I don't know enough about a
whole building boiler systems to know if hot water from a faucet comes
from the same place that provides heat to the buildings or not. What
I do know is that boiler systems are not commonly used in single
family housing here... like Aga stoves, they are out of the ordinary.


If they are heating water, it is a boiler. Sorry, but that is the
proper term. Single family to big apartment complex, boilers heat the
water. In smaller units like the house, they do both the heating and
the domestic water.
http://www.weil-mclain.com/en/weil-mclain/pc-boilers/


Like I said in another thread.... turn over enough rocks and you can
prove any point.

You will see units that do both.
http://www.weil-mclain.com/en/weil-m...ue-gas-boiler/
•Gas fired water boiler with cast aluminum heat exchanger
•Venturi mixing body mixes air and gas providing higher efficiency
•Designed to operate in low temperature condensing applications
•Outdoor reset and domestic hot water priority standard

I don't know what is common in your town, but they are very common in
the cooler climates. Millions of residential boilers exist. Probably
80% of the homes in New England have boilers. A few still have steam.


We had a hot water heater, not a boiler, when I lived in Michigan.
Water heaters have boilers in them, but no one and I mean NO ONE calls
the entire unit a boiler. Like I said before, commercial and public
buildings have large units called boilers but it is not a term used in
single family residential.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 01:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,855
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'mIn Hot Water!

On 3/15/2013 5:46 AM, Ophelia wrote:
"dsi1" wrote
On 3/14/2013 12:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:
Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of course
does both central heating and hot water

My step-mother said that the houses in her town (Gothenburg?) was
heated by water coming in from a hot water factory and distributed by
underground pipes. That was the nuttiest thing that I ever heard.
Those Swedes!


I saw that in Lincoln (UK)! About 30 years ago, a woman I knew moved
into a house on a new estate and all the houses were served by a central
boiler Never heard of it since though and I haven't been there for
many years, so I don't know if it is still in operation.

A place I stayed in central Reykyavik had radiators heated by volcanic
hot water...
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 01:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,854
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!


"sf" wrote in message
...



We had a hot water heater, not a boiler, when I lived in Michigan.
Water heaters have boilers in them, but no one and I mean NO ONE calls
the entire unit a boiler. Like I said before, commercial and public
buildings have large units called boilers but it is not a term used in
single family residential.



Domestic water heaters are different that the home heating units.

In my last house, we had a water heater that was stand alone, gas fired. We
also had a furnace that made hot air heat to keep the house warm. As you
mentioned, many furnaces can have refrigeration coils installed to cool the
air also. . It was very common in that t ype of house in the area. In
Philly, there could be hundreds of houses build at the same time with the
same heating systems. Some have furnaces, some have boilers, depending on
the design and the t ime period built.

Units that make both hot water for domestic use and are combined with the
heating water are boilers. That, your opinion aside is a fact. Just ask
anyone that makes boilers, designs boilers, installs boilers, the IBR, the
Hydronics Heating Association, and every boiler technician. Yes, some
people do incorrectly call them a furnace, but if you call a tomato an
apple, that does not mean it is correct.




  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 02:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,946
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!



"S Viemeister" wrote in message
...
On 3/15/2013 5:46 AM, Ophelia wrote:
"dsi1" wrote
On 3/14/2013 12:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:
Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of
course
does both central heating and hot water

My step-mother said that the houses in her town (Gothenburg?) was
heated by water coming in from a hot water factory and distributed by
underground pipes. That was the nuttiest thing that I ever heard.
Those Swedes!


I saw that in Lincoln (UK)! About 30 years ago, a woman I knew moved
into a house on a new estate and all the houses were served by a central
boiler Never heard of it since though and I haven't been there for
many years, so I don't know if it is still in operation.

A place I stayed in central Reykyavik had radiators heated by volcanic hot
water...


Cool ... er... or maybe ... not cool iyswim )

--
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 02:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,854
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!


"dsi1" wrote in message
...
On 3/14/2013 12:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:

Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of course
does both central heating and hot water


My step-mother said that the houses in her town (Gothenburg?) was heated
by water coming in from a hot water factory and distributed by underground
pipes. That was the nuttiest thing that I ever heard. Those Swedes!


It is common in big cities like New York and Philadelphia to have steam heat
supplied by a central location. This is usually done for the large
commercial buildings down town. not for residential units. Steam can be
piped fairly long distance with high pressure and a high concentration of
energy per cubic foot compared to water. Many high rise building use
steam for that reason.

The highest temperature you can move water is 212 degrees. Steam, however
can be moved at temperatures exceeding 500 degrees. Then piped through
pressure regulators at the point of use to a lower temperature.


  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 02:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,854
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!


"sf" wrote in message
You can add a circulation pump to a traditional standing water heater
tank. It's actually a very easy DIY. More difficult plumber job for the
tankless. The pump is installed under a sink furtherest from the tank.
You need an electrical source. It has a thermostat and when water in
the line cools it pulls hot water from the tank and pushes the cooled
water through the cold side back to the tank. I have had one before and
it works well.. not this brand though.

http://tinyurl.com/bnrvhdd

I looked it up immediately after I posted and found this one
http://www.rewci.com/whhohotwaci.html Looks like a great idea and not
expensive at all. I wonder why they aren't touted more?


That is a very interesting system. Used to be, you needed a return line and
it was a fairly expensive installation. This setup eliminates that.

The need also varies with the layout of the house. My hot water is located
fairly close to both bathrooms and kitchen so I don't see the need. In a
house that is very long and utilities at the far end, it can be a long wait
for the hot water. and perhaps can be justified.


  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 02:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,807
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'm In Hot Water!

On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 09:49:49 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"
wrote:

Units that make both hot water for domestic use and are combined with the
heating water are boilers.


That's my point. Stand alone water heaters are called water heaters,
they may have a boiler inside them but they are not called boilers by
the public. Not interested in what plumbers and engineers call them.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-03-2013, 02:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,855
Default Who Was It That Recently Asked About A Hot Water Heater -- I'mIn Hot Water!

On 3/15/2013 10:12 AM, Ophelia wrote:
"S Viemeister" wrote
On 3/15/2013 5:46 AM, Ophelia wrote:
"dsi1" wrote
On 3/14/2013 12:35 PM, Ophelia wrote:
Our unit looks exactly the same as the one Sheldon posted, and of
course does both central heating and hot water
My step-mother said that the houses in her town (Gothenburg?) was
heated by water coming in from a hot water factory and distributed by
underground pipes. That was the nuttiest thing that I ever heard.
I saw that in Lincoln (UK)! About 30 years ago, a woman I knew moved
into a house on a new estate and all the houses were served by a central
boiler Never heard of it since though and I haven't been there for
many years, so I don't know if it is still in operation.

A place I stayed in central Reykyavik had radiators heated by volcanic
hot water...


Cool ... er... or maybe ... not cool iyswim )

Warm and cosy in the middle of January!


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OT Water Heater Help! Julie Bove[_2_] General Cooking 61 23-01-2014 02:01 PM
Help with home water heater replacement Brooklyn1 General Cooking 0 07-02-2013 03:14 AM
Help with home water heater replacement Gary General Cooking 4 03-02-2013 08:59 AM
Help with home water heater replacement Julie Bove[_2_] General Cooking 3 03-02-2013 05:06 AM
OT- Flushing out your hot water heater? merryb General Cooking 67 15-06-2012 08:23 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:23 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017