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Old 04-03-2013, 04:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default The food programme bbc

The current one is from South Carolina and Louisiana and I am hearing all
about southern food A Brit is talking to them about their food and
tasting it Sounds wonderful

If I can find the programme on the BBC 'Listen Again' facility, I will post
it if you are interested in our take on it. The interviewer is mighty
impressed)
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Old 04-03-2013, 05:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0

US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina to
meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive ingredients
and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.
It's a story that involves an intricate "food tattoo", one of America's
biggest private seed collections, a hog roast and "pick picking" and bowls
of delicious peas, beans, rice, grits and fried chicken.
Soon after British settlers arrived in South Carolina in the 17th
century a cuisine called the "Carolina rice kitchen" was formed. Using the
expertise of West African slaves to develop rice plantations, a larder
evolved consisting of the main crop along with beans, African vegetables and
staples like oats, rye and wheat from Britain.
Chef Sean Brock believes it was one of the earliest, and "most
beautiful" food cultures in America. In his mid-thirties and sporting an arm
covered in tattoos of heirloom vegetables, he's attempting to "reboot" that
cuisine and those ingredients which had all disappeared by the 20th century.
He's joined forces with historian David Shields and a seed hunter, Glenn
Roberts, to source, grow and cook with these historic foods.
Richard joins Sean Brock at his restaurant, Husk to hear why "ridiculous
flavour" is the driving force behind the mission.

Fascinating stuff)

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Old 04-03-2013, 10:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default The food programme bbc

On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 15:58:22 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

The current one is from South Carolina and Louisiana and I am hearing all
about southern food A Brit is talking to them about their food and
tasting it Sounds wonderful

If I can find the programme on the BBC 'Listen Again' facility, I will post
it if you are interested in our take on it. The interviewer is mighty
impressed)
--


Sounds like an interesting show, please post if you ever find it. Do
you think we'd be able to access it if we don't show the BBC a British
IP address? Maybe it's on YouTube.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default The food programme bbc


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 15:58:22 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

The current one is from South Carolina and Louisiana and I am hearing all
about southern food A Brit is talking to them about their food and
tasting it Sounds wonderful

If I can find the programme on the BBC 'Listen Again' facility, I will
post
it if you are interested in our take on it. The interviewer is mighty
impressed)
--


Sounds like an interesting show, please post if you ever find it. Do
you think we'd be able to access it if we don't show the BBC a British
IP address? Maybe it's on YouTube.


Sorry I changed the subject line.

"US Southern Cooking BBC" All I can say is, try it.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC (was The food programme bbc)



"Ophelia" wrote in message
...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0

US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina to
meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive
ingredients and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.
It's a story that involves an intricate "food tattoo", one of America's
biggest private seed collections, a hog roast and "pick picking" and bowls
of delicious peas, beans, rice, grits and fried chicken.
Soon after British settlers arrived in South Carolina in the 17th
century a cuisine called the "Carolina rice kitchen" was formed. Using the
expertise of West African slaves to develop rice plantations, a larder
evolved consisting of the main crop along with beans, African vegetables
and staples like oats, rye and wheat from Britain.
Chef Sean Brock believes it was one of the earliest, and "most
beautiful" food cultures in America. In his mid-thirties and sporting an
arm covered in tattoos of heirloom vegetables, he's attempting to "reboot"
that cuisine and those ingredients which had all disappeared by the 20th
century.
He's joined forces with historian David Shields and a seed hunter,
Glenn Roberts, to source, grow and cook with these historic foods.
Richard joins Sean Brock at his restaurant, Husk to hear why
"ridiculous flavour" is the driving force behind the mission.

Fascinating stuff)

"--
--
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--
--
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 16:48:48 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0

US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina to
meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive ingredients
and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.


Thanks! I learned something: sorghum was the sugar of the South.
I've never eaten it, not sure if I've even seen it.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On 3/4/2013 11:48 AM, Ophelia wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0

US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina
to meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive
ingredients and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.
It's a story that involves an intricate "food tattoo", one of
America's biggest private seed collections, a hog roast and "pick
picking" and bowls of delicious peas, beans, rice, grits and fried chicken.
Soon after British settlers arrived in South Carolina in the 17th
century a cuisine called the "Carolina rice kitchen" was formed. Using
the expertise of West African slaves to develop rice plantations, a
larder evolved consisting of the main crop along with beans, African
vegetables and staples like oats, rye and wheat from Britain.
Chef Sean Brock believes it was one of the earliest, and "most
beautiful" food cultures in America. In his mid-thirties and sporting an
arm covered in tattoos of heirloom vegetables, he's attempting to
"reboot" that cuisine and those ingredients which had all disappeared by
the 20th century.
He's joined forces with historian David Shields and a seed hunter,
Glenn Roberts, to source, grow and cook with these historic foods.
Richard joins Sean Brock at his restaurant, Husk to hear why
"ridiculous flavour" is the driving force behind the mission.

Fascinating stuff)

"--


The great thing about the US is it is so large and so diverse. The
country is truly a melting pot of people and food cultures. I've lived
in many places in the US. But I've I have spent most of my adult life
in the south. First in the mid-south. Now in the deep-south. (Yes,
there is a difference.)

Rice is a primary product of the Carolinas and is used in many dishes.
The wetlands make it a perfect environment for growing rice. And yes, I
live on an island that was at one time a rice and indigo plantation.
This was in the late 1700's. Descendents of West African slaves still
live in this area. They have their own unique culture, known as
"Gullah" or "Geechee" (depending upon who you ask). They have a very
distinct dialect. (I'm good with dialects but I still have to listen
carefully to know what they're saying.) They also have a very rich and
historical food culture. It hasn't disappeared, you just have to know
where to look.

Enjoy the series! Sounds like fun!

Jill
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default The food programme bbc

On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 22:04:26 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 15:58:22 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

The current one is from South Carolina and Louisiana and I am hearing all
about southern food A Brit is talking to them about their food and
tasting it Sounds wonderful

If I can find the programme on the BBC 'Listen Again' facility, I will
post
it if you are interested in our take on it. The interviewer is mighty
impressed)
--


Sounds like an interesting show, please post if you ever find it. Do
you think we'd be able to access it if we don't show the BBC a British
IP address? Maybe it's on YouTube.


Sorry I changed the subject line.

"US Southern Cooking BBC" All I can say is, try it.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0
--

It's a radio program - no video. I was able to listen and replied
when I found your other post. Thanks.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mon, 04 Mar 2013 14:31:16 -0800, sf wrote:

On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 16:48:48 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0

US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina to
meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive ingredients
and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.


Thanks! I learned something: sorghum was the sugar of the South.
I've never eaten it, not sure if I've even seen it.


I used to see it in the grocery store next to the molasses, but that
was probably before we moved out west. I've never tried it.
Janet US
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mar 4, 4:31*pm, sf wrote:
On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 16:48:48 -0000, "Ophelia"

wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0


* *US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina to
meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive ingredients
and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.


Thanks! *I learned something: sorghum was the sugar of the South.
I've never eaten it, not sure if I've even seen it.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


We have sorghum here in farm country...with various local sources. I
love it ... Can find it in any supermarket. Look by the syrup and
molasses.

N.


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Old 05-03-2013, 03:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mar 4, 5:54*pm, Janet Bostwick wrote:
On Mon, 04 Mar 2013 14:31:16 -0800, sf wrote:
On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 16:48:48 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:


http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0


* *US Southern Cooking and Chef Sean Brock Johnson is in South Carolina to
meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive ingredients
and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years.


Thanks! *I learned something: sorghum was the sugar of the South.
I've never eaten it, not sure if I've even seen it.


I used to see it in the grocery store next to the molasses, but that
was probably before we moved out west. *I've never tried it.
Janet US


Try it on waffles or pancakes. We also eat it on hot cornbread, split
horizontally and spread generously with butter.

N.
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Old 05-03-2013, 03:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mar 4, 4:31*pm, sf wrote:


Thanks! *I learned something: sorghum was the sugar of the South.
I've never eaten it, not sure if I've even seen it.


My grandfather raised it for his mules. He'd cut a stalk for us kids
to eat and it was delicious.

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Old 05-03-2013, 04:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 18:33:10 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Mar 4, 4:31*pm, sf wrote:


Thanks! *I learned something: sorghum was the sugar of the South.
I've never eaten it, not sure if I've even seen it.


My grandfather raised it for his mules. He'd cut a stalk for us kids
to eat and it was delicious.


I had to look it up. I'd never considered it as a growing plant
before. After looking at the pictures, I know that I have never seen
it grown in any fields that I have passed. What an interesting plant.
I had no idea that it could be used as a grain and a flour.
Janet US
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default US Southern Cooking BBC

On Mon, 4 Mar 2013 18:22:30 -0800 (PST), Nancy2
wrote:

We have sorghum here in farm country...with various local sources. I
love it ... Can find it in any supermarket. Look by the syrup and
molasses.


I'll look if I think about it next time I'm at the grocery store.
What else is it used for? I can't imagine it as a sugar substitute.

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Old 05-03-2013, 03:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default The food programme bbc



"sf" wrote in message
...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r09t0
--

It's a radio program - no video. I was able to listen and replied
when I found your other post. Thanks.


YW. Yes of course it was a Radio programme It was advertised as being on
Radio 4 did it not? I am surprised that you were surprised
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