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Old 04-02-2013, 02:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US

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Old 04-02-2013, 03:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On Feb 4, 6:49*am, Janet Bostwick wrote:
As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? *Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US


This will give you a little history and how the two cuisines
developed.

http://hizzoners.com/southern-comforts/cajun-a-creole
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Old 04-02-2013, 03:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On Mon, 04 Feb 2013 07:49:22 -0700, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? Clueless northerner wants to know.


I've been wondering about it too and actually tried to find out. I
guess Cajun has more heat than Creole. I found this bit of history
interesting.
http://www.ehow.com/info_7929011_dif...seasoning.html

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Old 04-02-2013, 03:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 07:10:46 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
wrote:

On Feb 4, 6:49*am, Janet Bostwick wrote:
As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? *Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US


This will give you a little history and how the two cuisines
developed.

http://hizzoners.com/southern-comforts/cajun-a-creole

Thanks for the article. It refreshes my memory on the history of the
region. It doesn't answer the question 'is there a specific type of
seasoning that is Cajun and one that is Creole?' Is there a specific
spice or herb or combination that immediately identifies Creole or
Cajun?
Janet US
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On 2013-02-04, Janet Bostwick wrote:


region. It doesn't answer the question 'is there a specific type of
seasoning that is Cajun and one that is Creole?' Is there a specific
spice or herb or combination that immediately identifies Creole or
Cajun?


In practical terms, no.

I've only seen a distinction, once. That was with Golden Dipt, a line
of mixes and marinades from McCormick. They came out with a marinade
called Creole, years ago. I've praised it highly and often, here in
rfc. Then, it disappeared off the market. Now, I see GD Cajun
marinade is available. Is it the same? I don't know as I've not
tried the newer Cajun version. I will.

If you look at blends like Emeril's, Taggart's, Chachere's, Old Bay
(same stuff), they all say Creole or nothing (OB). Penzey's and SF
Herb Co call theirs Cajun. But, you note the individual spices and
it's mostly all the same thing, give or take an herb or two. More
alike than different.

In all the years I've been studying/eating Creole and Cajun cuisine,
near as I kin tell, it's basically a class distinction. The Creoles
were proud up-town Nawlins folk, all hoity-toity in their perceived fine
aristocratic heritage. Cajuns were equally proud of being down home
country folk with a fiercely independent streak. Whatever, most folks
can't tell the difference between either's traditional spice blends.

Me? Frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a damn! Jes gimme SOME!!

nb


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Old 04-02-2013, 05:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On 2013-02-04, ImStillMags wrote:

This will give you a little history and how the two cuisines
developed.

http://hizzoners.com/southern-comforts/cajun-a-creole


This corresponds nicely with what I know about the two groups. Very
well done.

nb
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:50 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet Bostwick View Post
As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US
Some interchangeability here..but the way it was splained to me speaking in general terms..Cajun is rural country type food. Creole is a more sophisticated culinary style exemplified by the efforts of various ethnic groups who settled around Nor'leans. One test I use is the use of tomato products. For example if you see a gumbo recipe calling for tomatoes it would generally be classified as Creole..while shunning tomatoes is a clue that it should be Cajun. Here is an link that might tell it better.

About Louisiana cuisine
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Old 04-02-2013, 08:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On 4 Feb 2013 16:56:58 GMT, notbob wrote:

On 2013-02-04, Janet Bostwick wrote:


region. It doesn't answer the question 'is there a specific type of
seasoning that is Cajun and one that is Creole?' Is there a specific
spice or herb or combination that immediately identifies Creole or
Cajun?


In practical terms, no.

I've only seen a distinction, once. That was with Golden Dipt, a line
of mixes and marinades from McCormick. They came out with a marinade
called Creole, years ago. I've praised it highly and often, here in
rfc. Then, it disappeared off the market. Now, I see GD Cajun
marinade is available. Is it the same? I don't know as I've not
tried the newer Cajun version. I will.

If you look at blends like Emeril's, Taggart's, Chachere's, Old Bay
(same stuff), they all say Creole or nothing (OB). Penzey's and SF
Herb Co call theirs Cajun. But, you note the individual spices and
it's mostly all the same thing, give or take an herb or two. More
alike than different.

In all the years I've been studying/eating Creole and Cajun cuisine,
near as I kin tell, it's basically a class distinction. The Creoles
were proud up-town Nawlins folk, all hoity-toity in their perceived fine
aristocratic heritage. Cajuns were equally proud of being down home
country folk with a fiercely independent streak. Whatever, most folks
can't tell the difference between either's traditional spice blends.

Me? Frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a damn! Jes gimme SOME!!

nb

Just opened a package of Tasso pork. Come and get it. Woo-eee,
that's some spicy stuff!
Janet US
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Old 04-02-2013, 09:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 18:50:37 +0000, bigwheel
wrote:


Janet Bostwick;1810556 Wrote:
As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US


Some interchangeability here..but the way it was splained to me speaking
in general terms..Cajun is rural country type food. Creole is a more
sophisticated culinary style exemplified by the efforts of various
ethnic groups who settled around Nor'leans. One test I use is the use of
tomato products. For example if you see a gumbo recipe calling for
tomatoes it would generally be classified as Creole..while shunning
tomatoes is a clue that it should be Cajun. Here is an link that might
tell it better.

'About Louisiana cuisine'
(http://www.gumbopages.com/food/about-food.html)


thank you for the link
Janet US
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On 2/4/2013 11:56 AM, notbob wrote:

If you look at blends like Emeril's, Taggart's, Chachere's, Old Bay
(same stuff), they all say Creole or nothing (OB). Penzey's and SF
Herb Co call theirs Cajun. But, you note the individual spices and
it's mostly all the same thing, give or take an herb or two. More
alike than different.


I mixed up a jar of Emerils Essence but I didn't think it was the same
as Old Bay seasoning, but now that you mention it, I'll have to look
again. I always have Old Bay on hand. Maybe I can cut one out of my store.


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Old 05-02-2013, 01:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On Tue, 5 Feb 2013 00:20:41 GMT, "l not -l" wrote:


On 4-Feb-2013, Janet Bostwick wrote:

Me? Frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a damn! Jes gimme SOME!!

nb

Just opened a package of Tasso pork. Come and get it. Woo-eee,
that's some spicy stuff!
Janet US

It's great in beans; I often use it when making red beans; however, this
week I'll be making black beans with it. A quarter pound of diced tasso
to a pound of beans gets the spice right for my taste.


Thanks for the tip! I got a huge gift basket for Christmas and there
is a lot of stuff in there from Louisiana.
Janet US
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On 2013-02-05, Cheryl wrote:

as Old Bay seasoning, but now that you mention it, I'll have to look
again. I always have Old Bay on hand. Maybe I can cut one out of my store.


I looked at all my cajun/creole seasonings. They all contain pretty
much the same spices. I did the straight powder-into-mouth taste test
and was a bit surprised to realize how spicy-hot Old Bay actually is.
I had it pegged as the wimpiest of them all and it really isn't. I
even used OB as a poultry rub, or used to. I no longer do chicken.

nb

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Old 05-02-2013, 04:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

Janet Bostwick wrote:
As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US


The Creoles were a higher social class than the Cajuns. I believe they
use the same spices, but Creole food has more sophisticated
preparations. Gross simplification: Creole is European (French and
Spanish) with African influence. Cajun is poor country-folk food
(one-pot meals) with Creole influence and probably uses more peppers.

Jambalaya is a Creole dish, and closely resembles paella. Gumbo is
Cajun, and basically a spicy stew made with chicken or locally-caught
fish and shellfish. I don't know if anyone makes squirrel gumbo, but it
would fit.

I could be totally wrong about this; but that's how it looked from East
Texas ;-)

Bob
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On 2/5/2013 7:31 AM, notbob wrote:
On 2013-02-05, Cheryl wrote:

as Old Bay seasoning, but now that you mention it, I'll have to look
again. I always have Old Bay on hand. Maybe I can cut one out of my store.


I looked at all my cajun/creole seasonings. They all contain pretty
much the same spices. I did the straight powder-into-mouth taste test
and was a bit surprised to realize how spicy-hot Old Bay actually is.
I had it pegged as the wimpiest of them all and it really isn't. I
even used OB as a poultry rub, or used to. I no longer do chicken.

nb

It really is, isn't it. I like Old Bay sprinkled on popcorn.
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Creole vs. Cajun seasoning -- difference"

On Mon, 04 Feb 2013 07:49:22 -0700, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

As the subject line says, is there a specific difference between the
two? Clueless northerner wants to know.
Janet US


Thanks everyone for all the tips and links. I think I have a general
ideas now of what's what. Thanks again
Janet US


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