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Old 29-10-2012, 01:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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sf wrote:

I've never seen brown peas before. If I did, I must have thought they
were something else. When I have a ham bone, I use split peas which
are green - or any of a dozen or more other beans to make soup.


They must have sold them more often back in the early 60's? When I was a
kid (elementary school), pea-shooters were popular with us fellows. It was
just a large diameter plastic straw that came with a supply of "ammo." We
used to get more ammo from the grocery store...one pound bags of nice round
tan peas.

I've also wondered about that because I never see them in the grocery store
anymore.

Gary

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Old 29-10-2012, 02:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 29, 6:07*am, Gary wrote:
sf wrote:

I've never seen brown peas before. *If I did, I must have thought they
were something else. *When I have a ham bone, I use split peas which
are green - or any of a dozen or more other beans to make soup.


They must have sold them more often back in the early 60's? *When I was a
kid (elementary school), pea-shooters were popular with us fellows. *It was
just a large diameter plastic straw that came with a supply of "ammo." *We
used to get more ammo from the grocery store...one pound bags of nice round
tan peas.

I've also wondered about that because I never see them in the grocery store
anymore.

Gary


They were probably pigeon peas. Mostly you fund them where people
make peas and riceo on a regular basis. More Caribbean oriented
foods. Here's a pic.

http://www.trimurtigroup.com/images/...uct_pigeon.jpg
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Old 29-10-2012, 02:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 29, 7:08*am, ImStillMags wrote:
On Oct 29, 6:07*am, Gary wrote:



sf wrote:


I've never seen brown peas before. *If I did, I must have thought they
were something else. *When I have a ham bone, I use split peas which
are green - or any of a dozen or more other beans to make soup.


They must have sold them more often back in the early 60's? *When I was a
kid (elementary school), pea-shooters were popular with us fellows. *It was
just a large diameter plastic straw that came with a supply of "ammo." *We
used to get more ammo from the grocery store...one pound bags of nice round
tan peas.


I've also wondered about that because I never see them in the grocery store
anymore.


Gary


They were probably pigeon peas. * *Mostly you fund them where people
make peas and riceo on a regular basis. *More Caribbean oriented
foods. * Here's a pic.

http://www.trimurtigroup.com/images/...uct_pigeon.jpg


So this got me to poking around about pigeon peas. What a cool
plant. If you live in the Southerly climes you should look at
growing some.

http://www.tropicalpermaculture.com/pigeon-pea.html
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Old 29-10-2012, 03:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 07:08:20 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:

On Oct 29, 6:07*am, Gary wrote:
sf wrote:

I've never seen brown peas before. *If I did, I must have thought they
were something else. *When I have a ham bone, I use split peas which
are green - or any of a dozen or more other beans to make soup.


They must have sold them more often back in the early 60's? *When I was a
kid (elementary school), pea-shooters were popular with us fellows. *It was
just a large diameter plastic straw that came with a supply of "ammo." *We
used to get more ammo from the grocery store...one pound bags of nice round
tan peas.

I've also wondered about that because I never see them in the grocery store
anymore.

Gary


They were probably pigeon peas. Mostly you fund them where people
make peas and riceo on a regular basis. More Caribbean oriented
foods. Here's a pic.

http://www.trimurtigroup.com/images/...uct_pigeon.jpg


Since we're talking about beans & rice, I need to ask you something...
I always thought red beans and rice was a fairly dry dish. Either the
beans were mixed into the rice
http://prescottollinewsletter.files..../red-beans.jpg

or the beans were cooked down to a thick gravy and served on top of
rice, http://www.simplyrecipes.com/photos/...ans-rice-2.jpg

but the red beans and rice I ran across the other day was soup. Is
that normal or was it just their soup of the day?

--
I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila
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Old 29-10-2012, 03:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 07:15:34 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:

On Oct 29, 7:08*am, ImStillMags wrote:
On Oct 29, 6:07*am, Gary wrote:



sf wrote:


I've never seen brown peas before. *If I did, I must have thought they
were something else. *When I have a ham bone, I use split peas which
are green - or any of a dozen or more other beans to make soup.


They must have sold them more often back in the early 60's? *When I was a
kid (elementary school), pea-shooters were popular with us fellows. *It was
just a large diameter plastic straw that came with a supply of "ammo." *We
used to get more ammo from the grocery store...one pound bags of nice round
tan peas.


I've also wondered about that because I never see them in the grocery store
anymore.


Gary


They were probably pigeon peas. * *Mostly you fund them where people
make peas and riceo on a regular basis. *More Caribbean oriented
foods. * Here's a pic.

http://www.trimurtigroup.com/images/...uct_pigeon.jpg


So this got me to poking around about pigeon peas. What a cool
plant. If you live in the Southerly climes you should look at
growing some.

http://www.tropicalpermaculture.com/pigeon-pea.html


I figured out that marrowfat peas are really just mature English peas
(which I guess are better known as "garden peas" to them) that have
been allowed to dry. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marrowfat_peas but
here's an interesting article - if you're interested in the topic of
"peas"
http://adambalic.typepad.com/the_art...aple_peas.html

--
I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila


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Old 29-10-2012, 04:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 10/29/2012 11:33 AM, sf wrote:

I figured out that marrowfat peas are really just mature English peas
(which I guess are better known as "garden peas" to them) that have
been allowed to dry. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marrowfat_peas but
here's an interesting article - if you're interested in the topic of
"peas"


http://adambalic.typepad.com/the_art...aple_peas.html

I stopped reading that article about halfway through - the author could
use a few lessons in grammar and spelling.
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Old 29-10-2012, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 29, 8:18*am, sf wrote:
On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 07:08:20 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags





wrote:
On Oct 29, 6:07*am, Gary wrote:
sf wrote:


I've never seen brown peas before. *If I did, I must have thought they
were something else. *When I have a ham bone, I use split peas which
are green - or any of a dozen or more other beans to make soup.


They must have sold them more often back in the early 60's? *When I was a
kid (elementary school), pea-shooters were popular with us fellows. *It was
just a large diameter plastic straw that came with a supply of "ammo." *We
used to get more ammo from the grocery store...one pound bags of nice round
tan peas.


I've also wondered about that because I never see them in the grocery store
anymore.


Gary


They were probably pigeon peas. * *Mostly you fund them where people
make peas and riceo on a regular basis. *More Caribbean oriented
foods. * Here's a pic.


http://www.trimurtigroup.com/images/...uct_pigeon.jpg


Since we're talking about beans & rice, I need to ask you something...
I always thought red beans and rice was a fairly dry dish. *Either the
beans were mixed into the ricehttp://prescottollinewsletter.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/red-beans.jpg

or the beans were cooked down to a thick gravy and served on top of
rice,http://www.simplyrecipes.com/photos/...ans-rice-2.jpg

but the red beans and rice I ran across the other day was soup. *Is
that normal or was it just their soup of the day?

--
I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila


My red beans and rice are not cooked down to a thick gravy and it
definitely is NOT a soup.

They are served with rice. I usually serve them with a scoop of rice
on the top.

http://www.hizzoners.com/recipes/lun...d-beans-a-rice
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Old 30-10-2012, 04:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 12:37:11 -0400, S Viemeister
wrote:

On 10/29/2012 11:33 AM, sf wrote:

I figured out that marrowfat peas are really just mature English peas
(which I guess are better known as "garden peas" to them) that have
been allowed to dry. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marrowfat_peas but
here's an interesting article - if you're interested in the topic of
"peas"


http://adambalic.typepad.com/the_art...aple_peas.html

I stopped reading that article about halfway through - the author could
use a few lessons in grammar and spelling.


I doubt any of that information was new to you anyway.

--
I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila


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