General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 12:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,987
Default Clarified butter (ghee):



Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 12:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,199
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On Aug 28, 4:37*pm, Kalmia wrote:
*Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


Called for what...the second coming?
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 12:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,976
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

Andy wrote:

Growing up clarified butter was for artichokes.


Why on earth would you bother?


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 01:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,121
Default Clarified butter (ghee):


"Kalmia" wrote in message
...


Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


yes. why do you ask?


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 02:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 46,524
Default Clarified butter (ghee):


"Kalmia" wrote in message
...


Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


Not sure. I think I have only ever used one recipe that called for it.
That was a great many years ago. I can't even remember what it was but I
think asparagus was involved. It was something I wouldn't eat. My husband
did. No complaints. Not sure if it would have worked or not if I had used
regular butter.




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 02:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 530
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On 8/28/12 7:37 PM, Kalmia wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


I usually use commercial jars of ghee, rather than clarifying a pound of
butter at a time, as I used to.

I use ghee almost daily, either straight or mixed with olive oil. It's
one of the most valuable items within arm's reach of my cooktop.

My big twelve things I'm always reaching for:

1. Salts
2. Peppers
3. Olive oils
4. House spice mix
5. Ghee
6. Sugar
7. Chicken stock
8. Bacon fat
9. Honey
10. Balsamic vinegar
11. Soy sauce
12. Tomato paste

(off the top of my head, not including vegetables like garlic, shallots,
onion, etc.)

-- Larry

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 03:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 996
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

"Kalmia" wrote in message
...


Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


Given that I use if in Indian cooking, and the recipes specify it, I do use
it. I can't imagine using butter for the same dishes.


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 06:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 2,166
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On Aug 28, 9:53*pm, pltrgyst wrote:

I use ghee almost daily, either straight or mixed with olive oil. It's
one of the most valuable items within arm's reach of my cooktop.



I know what clarified butter is but have never made it. My
grandmother used it for all cooking calling for butter. I have made
some of her dishes - not bad - but in the spirit of replication
something was missing, and I have determined it was the clarified
butter she used. She had one dish that calls for browning meat cubes
in butter and then tossing in a bunch of string beans on top of the
meat for about 45, stirring only after they've wilted a bit. My
version, which I made several times, was always ok, but there seemed
to be something lacking. I am sure it was the clarified butter. Her
string beans always came out slightly darker and more flavorful. I
suppose the clarified butter is not necessary for any dish, but I'm
sure it's a bonus for some. I don't think she refrigerated her. It
always sat by the stove with a cover over it most of the time,
sometimes not. I guess with her being in the kitchen the turn-over
rate was high. But I remember that butter and it's rich smell. I
definitely think it makes a difference in some dishes and may one day
put it to the test by making some clarified butter for my own use.
(unless it's too much work, in which case that's one more thing I'll
know a little less about).

TJ
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 08:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,407
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

Ad wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


It's in part a technical matter, ghee having a higher smoke point.


In fact the recipe for cotoletta alla milanese calls for clarified butter
exactly for that reason.


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 04:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,474
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On Aug 28, 8:52*pm, Ad wrote:
On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 16:37:01 -0700 (PDT), Kalmia

wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


It's in part a technical matter, ghee having a higher smoke point.

Ad


That's correct . You can fry and brown items at a high temperature
without burning the butter. This allows one to use butter instead of
oil and gives a different dimension to the flavor.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 04:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,976
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

Ad wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


It's in part a technical matter, ghee having a higher smoke point.


Not to mention milking the yak.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 04:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,414
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On Wed, 29 Aug 2012 11:17:33 -0400, George M. Middius
wrote:

Ad wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


It's in part a technical matter, ghee having a higher smoke point.


Not to mention milking the yak.

no yak need be involved, cow is just fine.
Janet US
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 04:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,976
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

Janet Bostwick wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?

It's in part a technical matter, ghee having a higher smoke point.


Not to mention milking the yak.

no yak need be involved, cow is just fine.


Sorry, but you can't get ghee from a cow.




  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 05:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
gtr gtr is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,139
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On 2012-08-29 01:53:08 +0000, pltrgyst said:

On 8/28/12 7:37 PM, Kalmia wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


I usually use commercial jars of ghee, rather than clarifying a pound
of butter at a time, as I used to.

I use ghee almost daily, either straight or mixed with olive oil. It's
one of the most valuable items within arm's reach of my cooktop.


What do you use it for.


My big twelve things I'm always reaching for:

1. Salts
2. Peppers
3. Olive oils
4. House spice mix


This is *your* house spice mix? What's in it?

5. Ghee
6. Sugar
7. Chicken stock
8. Bacon fat
9. Honey
10. Balsamic vinegar
11. Soy sauce
12. Tomato paste

(off the top of my head, not including vegetables like garlic,
shallots, onion, etc.)

-- Larry



  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-08-2012, 05:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
gtr gtr is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,139
Default Clarified butter (ghee):

On 2012-08-29 07:55:46 +0000, ViLco said:

Ad wrote:

Do you find it beneficial to use clarified butter when called for?


It's in part a technical matter, ghee having a higher smoke point.


In fact the recipe for cotoletta alla milanese calls for clarified
butter exactly for that reason.


That's what I've always heard. So when one wants to cook in butter but
wants to cook at a higher temperature, one uses ghee. Is that pretty
much it?

Oil's smoke point is much higher than butter too, so--except for the
flavor profile--it would be about the same thing as ghee, right?

I've always assume that Indian's used ghee because vegetable oils were
difficult to come by or hard to keep or something.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Problems Making Purified Butter / Indian Ghee W General Cooking 37 16-08-2016 01:23 AM
Clarified butter notbob General Cooking 11 06-09-2014 07:57 PM
hollandaise; clarified butter? Michael Horowitz General Cooking 6 04-05-2010 09:52 PM
What is the product of Butter Ghee and White Butter? Friends,pls help me clarify them,thank you! Asring General Cooking 1 21-04-2006 03:20 PM
What is clarified butter Kenneth General Cooking 14 05-02-2004 11:57 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:42 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017