General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-05-2012, 07:28 PM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Pensacola, FL
Posts: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to Dr. John Burge
Question Long Term Food Storage

We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency. We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water harvesting system. Additionally we have racked up a number of canned goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated foods. We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and corn meal for instance. Does anyone have a tried and true method of storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time (months and years)? Thanks.

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-05-2012, 10:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,046
Default Long Term Food Storage

On May 22, 11:28*am, Dr. John Burge
wrote:
We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. *Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. *We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. *Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? *Thanks.

--
Dr. John Burge


Be sure you have your tinfoil hats at the ready!
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 01:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,546
Default Long Term Food Storage

On Tue, 22 May 2012 18:28:44 +0000, Dr. John Burge
wrote:


We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? Thanks.


Raw rice can be nitrogen packed just like coffee...
http://www.prepareco.com/Bulk_Long_W...ice_p/1016.htm
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 10:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 6,882
Default Long Term Food Storage



"Dr. John Burge" wrote in
message news

We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? Thanks.


John, the general rule is store what you eat now, or the nearest long-life
equivalent. MREs are just about OK but if you don't like chilli or chicken
then there is no point in storing packet or tinned versions of either
thinking that if you are hungry enough you will eat them, though if you are
in a larger group there will probably be someone who likes them. If it is
just for your own family there are plenty of alternatives, so store what you
enjoy. If you can store what you already use you are also more likely to
constantly rotate your stocks so that they remain fresh.

To some extent what you store also depends on the extent of your other
stocks, such as water and fuel. If you have limited space for, and access to
further supplies of either, then you need food that is ready to eat rather
than things which need rehydrating or cooking. You can eat baked beans or
tinned chicken curry cold and straight from the can even if they are not the
most appetising that way but rice is hard to digest when dry and uncooked,
so even if you have a 25 pound bag of it you are likely to go hungry if you
have little water and no fuel available. If, however, you have plenty of
fuel and a reliable source of water then dehydrated foods like pasta, rice,
noodles, etc. are light, relatively cheap, long-life and easy to store in
bulk.

The most secure way is separate large bags into smaller Mylar bags,
preferably 1 family meal sized portion per bag, vacuum evacuate the air and
then heat seal the bag. Mark the bag with it's contents, the date stored,
and any special cooking instructions, then place dry ice or oxygen absorbers
in a larger Mylar bag in a sealable container such as a food-grade 5 gallon
barrel with an air-tight top. When the evaporating ice has displaced most of
the air or immediately after adding the O2 absorber and food bags, fit the
top and seal it. Then place the container in a suitably dry cool place. If
the temperature range where you are is quite wide, it is probably best to
bury the containers, preferably under an outbuilding where the ground will
not freeze too hard for you to dig up the container if you need it in
winter. Dried food stored this way will last for at least 15 years and some
for far longer.

Try http://www.sorbertsystems.com, or http://waltonfeed.com, or someone from
your local LDS community, for sources of relevant supplies. Some LDS online
sites also offer a lot of good information about food storage and much else
in the way of prepping.


--

http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 01:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 170
Default Long Term Food Storage


"Dr. John Burge" wrote in
message news

We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.


The most important thing to have is weapons to protect your hoard from
hungry enemies.


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 03:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 111
Default Long Term Food Storage

On 5/23/2012 7:26 AM, news wrote:
"Dr. John wrote in
message news

We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.


The most important thing to have is weapons to protect your hoard from
hungry enemies.


Oh, he's got LOTS of those. And lots of imaginary enemies, too.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 04:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 403
Default Long Term Food Storage

On Tue, 22 May 2012 18:28:44 +0000, Dr. John Burge
wrote:


We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? Thanks.


Better get your arse in gear Doc. You've only got 4 days left.
http://the-end.com/2008GodsFinalWitn...FWQDQAod80WB2g

Ross.
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 04:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,238
Default Long Term Food Storage

On May 22, 1:28*pm, Dr. John Burge
wrote:
We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. *Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. *We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. *Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? *Thanks.

--
Dr. John Burge


A doomsday believer, eh? Buy the rice in small enough quantities to
put it in the freezer for a day or so before storing it - should kill
anything already there. In any event, people who store large
quantities of water, canned goods and dry goods are told to routinely
rotate it into current meals and then replace it, so cans don't burst
and critters don't take over.

I had a can of sauerkraut in my pantry for probably 5-6 years before I
noticed it had burst its seams...and there wasn't any dent in it to
begin with - it just did that on its own fermentation schedule. Be
careful. You don't want to survive whatever doomsday comes and then
die of botulism.

N.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 04:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,238
Default Long Term Food Storage

On May 23, 6:20*am, Janet wrote:
In article ,
says...











On 5/22/2012 2:28 PM, Dr. John Burge wrote:
We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency..
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. *Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. *We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. *Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? *Thanks.


What about plastic bins? *I'm sure if critters want to get in they can,
but it makes it harder.


* *He means insects mites and weevils etc, which are often already "in"
grains etc, from bulk handling plants. Keeping a 56 lb sack of rice or
flour in a plastic bin, warm and dry, is *like sending all those mites and
weevils on a luxury holiday cruise for a year; nothing to do but lie
around eating and having sex.

* * *Janet.


LOL - great image, thanks! ;-)

N.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 05:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
gtr gtr is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,139
Default Long Term Food Storage

On 2012-05-23 14:11:50 +0000, Hell Toupee said:

The most important thing to have is weapons to protect your hoard from
hungry enemies.


Oh, he's got LOTS of those. And lots of imaginary enemies, too.


They are even worse! They keep you from sleeping at night and
frequently turn your friends and family into foes.

On another note, the "long term emergency" initially stated, is that
just logically to be assumed as the complete collapse of modern
society? I thought it might meen a devastating earthquake that cut off
highly populated communities from power and supplies for many weeks,
perhaps months. But here I guess we're assuming no relief whatever
from governmental services or aid groups.

I would think if we were talking a collapse of society, that getting a
crew together for ensuring consistent water supply, and farming would
be job #1, including the equipment, seed, and other aspects needed to
feed the necessary people for many years.

With all the guns and ammo imaginable and safe access to your food and
water, next year you'll need more of both, and a family of two adults
and two children could have a hard time growing enough food to keep
starvation at bay for very long.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 09:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 23,098
Default Long Term Food Storage

news wrote:

"Dr. John Burge" wrote in
message news

We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.


The most important thing to have is weapons to protect your hoard from
hungry enemies.


I'm having visions of the Road Warrior movies here. ehheh

And in my opinion:

1) replace your stored water often. You keep it too long and it turns into
swamp water
2) replace your canned food often too. They do have expiration dates.
3) Insect eggs are common in grains. You can sterilize them in the oven
before storing.
4) tin foil hats and weapons are optional.

Gary
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-05-2012, 11:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,055
Default Long Term Food Storage

news wrote:

"Dr. John Burge" wrote in
message news

We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.


The most important thing to have is weapons to protect your hoard from
hungry enemies.


Heck, if you have guns and ammo, you don't
need food as long as you know where John lives.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-05-2012, 12:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,302
Default Long Term Food Storage

Dr. John Burge wrote:
We are storing up food (and water) for an all out long-term emergency.
We have stored 100 gallons of water and have constructed a rain water
harvesting system. Additionally we have racked up a number of canned
goods and staples as well as a large supply of MRE's and dehydrated
foods. We want to store rice and beans in a large quantity for feeding
large groups but have held off because of the high potential of little
critters often found in raw rice and wheat or corn products - flour and
corn meal for instance. Does anyone have a tried and true method of
storing a large quantity rice (100 lb sacks) for a long period of time
(months and years)? Thanks.





What I worry about, besides food, if the power grid went out in the winter,
you need wood and a stove. No electricity, everything becomes unavailable.
You might need to listen to special radio stations. Communication, ham and
cb. Need solar panels or other generation. Forget about gasoline. Need to
get through the winter, hopefully with emergency supplies from troops. Snow
might help. Need clorox.

Greg
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-05-2012, 01:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
gtr gtr is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,139
Default Long Term Food Storage

On 2012-05-23 22:36:15 +0000, Mark Thorson said:

Heck, if you have guns and ammo, you don't
need food as long as you know where John lives.


Bad news. John's out of food.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long Term Food Storage z z General Cooking 5 01-06-2012 05:47 PM
Long Term Food Storage Momma Raider General Cooking 0 24-05-2012 03:35 AM
Horizontal vs Vertical long term storage Casey Wilson Winemaking 8 05-05-2007 04:21 PM
long-term storage of starter Maria Sourdough 9 23-01-2004 11:57 PM
Cooking oil storage long term? Survival Bill Preserving 1 10-11-2003 02:40 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:03 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017