General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-03-2012, 05:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 173
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"


The sequel was "Sinkin Spells, Hot Flashes, Fits and Cravins." (It has
a lot of recipes for mass gatherings, unlike the first. It also has
long tales by Southerners.)

There are also the books "The Treasury of White Trash Cooking" and
"White Trash Cooking II."

I found out that the main differences between "Sinkin Spells, Hot
Flashes, Fits and Cravins" and "The Treasury of White Trash Cooking"
is that the latter has 138 extra pages of recipes and an extra set of
photos. The former includes fan reviews, including ones from Harper
Lee and the late actress Helen Hayes. It also includes a preface by
the late North Carolina publisher Jonathan Williams.

What I want to know is, what, if anything, is different about "White
Trash Cooking II"?

And for those who might be interested, in the original "White Trash
Cooking," the late Ernest M. Mickler wrote:

"Never in my whole put-together life could I write down on paper a
hard, fast definition of White Trash. Because, for us, as for our
[American] southern White Trash cooking, there are no hard and fast
rules. We don't like to be hemmed in! But the first thing you've got
to understand is that there's white trash and there's White Trash.
Manners and pride separate the two. Common white trash has very little
in the way of pride, and no manners to speak of, and hardly any
respect for anybody or anything. But where I come from in North
Florida you never failed to say 'yes ma'm' and 'no sir,' never sat on
a made-up bed (or put your hat on it) never opened someone else's
icebox, never left food on your plate, never left the table without
permission, and never forgot to say 'thank you' for the teeniest
favor. That's the way the ones before us were raised and that's the
way they raised us in the South...."

And, from Jonathan Williams' 2008 obit:

"His curmudgeonly affinity for the low-brow led, in 1986, to the
publication by Jargon of Ernest Mickler's 'White Trash Cooking,' with
recipes for delicacies like cooter pie, okra omelets and potato-chip
sandwiches. New York publishers initially declined to buy the
manuscript unless the author changed the title to something like 'Poor
Southern Cooking.' When Mr. Mickler refused, Mr. Williams gave him a
$1,000 advance and ordered a modest 5,000-copy first printing. It was
a best seller and was the only seriously profitable Jargon
publication."


Lenona.

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2012, 01:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 378
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

In article
,
Lenona wrote:

The sequel was "Sinkin Spells, Hot Flashes, Fits and Cravins." (It has
a lot of recipes for mass gatherings, unlike the first. It also has
long tales by Southerners.)

There are also the books "The Treasury of White Trash Cooking" and
"White Trash Cooking II."

I found out that the main differences between "Sinkin Spells, Hot
Flashes, Fits and Cravins" and "The Treasury of White Trash Cooking"
is that the latter has 138 extra pages of recipes and an extra set of
photos. The former includes fan reviews, including ones from Harper
Lee and the late actress Helen Hayes. It also includes a preface by
the late North Carolina publisher Jonathan Williams.

What I want to know is, what, if anything, is different about "White
Trash Cooking II"?

And for those who might be interested, in the original "White Trash
Cooking," the late Ernest M. Mickler wrote:

"Never in my whole put-together life could I write down on paper a
hard, fast definition of White Trash. Because, for us, as for our
[American] southern White Trash cooking, there are no hard and fast
rules. We don't like to be hemmed in! But the first thing you've got
to understand is that there's white trash and there's White Trash.
Manners and pride separate the two. Common white trash has very little
in the way of pride, and no manners to speak of, and hardly any
respect for anybody or anything. But where I come from in North
Florida you never failed to say 'yes ma'm' and 'no sir,' never sat on
a made-up bed (or put your hat on it) never opened someone else's
icebox, never left food on your plate, never left the table without
permission, and never forgot to say 'thank you' for the teeniest
favor. That's the way the ones before us were raised and that's the
way they raised us in the South...."

And, from Jonathan Williams' 2008 obit:

"His curmudgeonly affinity for the low-brow led, in 1986, to the
publication by Jargon of Ernest Mickler's 'White Trash Cooking,' with
recipes for delicacies like cooter pie, okra omelets and potato-chip
sandwiches. New York publishers initially declined to buy the
manuscript unless the author changed the title to something like 'Poor
Southern Cooking.' When Mr. Mickler refused, Mr. Williams gave him a
$1,000 advance and ordered a modest 5,000-copy first printing. It was
a best seller and was the only seriously profitable Jargon
publication."


Lenona.


I'm sorry I can't help you, Lenona. I've only seen the first book which
I'm glad to say I've got a copy. (It's published by 10 Speed Press and
still in print.) Besides the recipes it has a section of very worthwhile
photographs taken by Mickler. I guess his title wouldn't be my choice-
I'm more inclined to use something like "Southern Rural Poor" which I'm
sure wouldn't sell as many books. I'm not being pc, but, my mother's
family comes from the Cumberland River valley where it flows from
Kentucky into Tennessee and they were poor but would just never call
themselves by that name. I'm really here to praise the book and not
criticize the title. Its got the best and one of the briefest
instructions on how to take care of cast iron cook wear and I quote:
'Netty Irene says, "It's no trouble at all! All you got to do is rench
'em out, wipe 'em out with a dishrag, and put 'em on the fire to dry out
all the water. Then tear off a piece of grocery bag and fold it about
two inches square. Dab it in grease and smear it round 'n round the
bottom and sides 'til they're plenty covered. Let'em cool and hang 'em
on a nail." '

D.M.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2012, 03:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 173
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

More from the first book:

If you live in the South, you know that the old White Trash tradition
of cooking is still very much alive, especially in the country. This
tradition of cooking is different from "Soul Food". White Trash food
is not as highly seasoned, it's not as greasy and you don't cook it as
long. Of course, there's no denying that Soul Food is a kissin'
cousin. All the ingredients are just about the same. But White Trash
food, as you'll see by and by, has has a great deal more variety.

If someone asked me what sets WhiteTrash cooking aside from other
kinds of cooking, I would have to name three of the ingredients:
saltmeat, cornmeal, and molasses. Every vegetable eaten is seasoned
with saltmeat, bacon or ham. Cornbread, made with pure cornmeal, is a
must with every meal, especially if there's pot liquor. And many foods
are rolled in cornmeal before they are fried. Of course nothing makes
cornbread better than a spoon or two of bacon drippings and molasses.
For the sweetest pies and pones you ever sunk a tooth into, molasses
is the one ingredient you can't find a substitute for. And a little
bit of it, used on the side, can top off the flavors of most Southern
food, even a day-old biscuit.

(end)

Lenona.

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2012, 05:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,555
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

Lenona wrote:
More from the first book:

If you live in the South, you know that the old White Trash tradition
of cooking is still very much alive, especially in the country. This
tradition of cooking is different from "Soul Food". White Trash food
is not as highly seasoned, it's not as greasy and you don't cook it as
long. Of course, there's no denying that Soul Food is a kissin'
cousin. All the ingredients are just about the same. But White Trash
food, as you'll see by and by, has has a great deal more variety.

If someone asked me what sets WhiteTrash cooking aside from other
kinds of cooking, I would have to name three of the ingredients:
saltmeat, cornmeal, and molasses. Every vegetable eaten is seasoned
with saltmeat, bacon or ham. Cornbread, made with pure cornmeal, is a
must with every meal, especially if there's pot liquor. And many foods
are rolled in cornmeal before they are fried. Of course nothing makes
cornbread better than a spoon or two of bacon drippings and molasses.
For the sweetest pies and pones you ever sunk a tooth into, molasses
is the one ingredient you can't find a substitute for. And a little
bit of it, used on the side, can top off the flavors of most Southern
food, even a day-old biscuit.

(end)

Lenona.



I disagree with almost everything you said. You're not *totally* off,
but mostly just listing stereotypes.

And the quintessential ingredient, even though it doesn't go in
everything, is Crisco.

Bob
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2012, 07:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,238
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Mar 20, 10:36*am, Lenona wrote:
More from the first book:


If someone asked me what sets WhiteTrash cooking aside from other

Lenona.


There's more? What fool of a publisher would take this on....or did
you self-publish it?

N.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2012, 08:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 12:55:32 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
wrote:

On Mar 20, 10:36*am, Lenona wrote:
More from the first book:


If someone asked me what sets WhiteTrash cooking aside from other

Lenona.


There's more? What fool of a publisher would take this on....or did
you self-publish it?

That cookbook has been around long enough to have a Vol. 2
http://www.amazon.com/White-Trash-Co.../dp/0898152070
http://www.google.com/books?printsec=frontcover&id=SzaeduhU2AEC#v=onepag e&q&f=false
and there's a road kill cookbook too.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-03-2012, 08:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,238
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Mar 20, 3:24*pm, sf wrote:
On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 12:55:32 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2

wrote:
On Mar 20, 10:36*am, Lenona wrote:
More from the first book:


If someone asked me what sets WhiteTrash cooking aside from other


Lenona.


There's more? *What fool of a publisher would take this on....or did
you self-publish it?


That cookbook has been around long enough to have a Vol. 2http://www.amazon.com/White-Trash-Cooking-Ernest-Mickler/dp/0898152070
http://www.google.com/books?printsec=frontcover&id=SzaeduhU2AEC#v=one...
and there's a road kill cookbook too.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


That's unfortunate.

N.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-03-2012, 06:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 173
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Mar 20, 1:29*pm, zxcvbob wrote:


I disagree with almost everything you said. *You're not *totally* off,
but mostly just listing stereotypes.


Sorry I didn't put in quotes......MICKLER was the author of what I
quoted.

I DID say "more from the first book," so I didn't think I needed to
make it clear that I wasn't the author.

Anyway, I can tell some of the recipes would be awful to almost anyone
who didn't grow up with them, but a few are quite good, such as the
banana pudding and the corned beef hash. The salmon pie wasn't bad
either.

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-03-2012, 06:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,238
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Mar 21, 1:13*pm, Lenona wrote:
On Mar 20, 1:29*pm, zxcvbob wrote:



I disagree with almost everything you said. *You're not *totally* off,
but mostly just listing stereotypes.


Sorry I didn't put in quotes......MICKLER was the author of what I
quoted.

I DID say "more from the first book," so I didn't think I needed to
make it clear that I wasn't the author.

Anyway, I can tell some of the recipes would be awful to almost anyone
who didn't grow up with them, but a few are quite good, such as the
banana pudding and the corned beef hash. The salmon pie wasn't bad
either.


Heck, if salmon pie is like my recipe which is like a salmon quiche,
it would be delicious. I wasn't necessarily commenting on the recipes
themselves, just the supercilious inaccuracy of this description of
white trash cooking. ("If someone asked me what sets WhiteTrash
cooking aside from other kinds of cooking, I would have to name three
of the ingredients:
saltmeat, cornmeal, and molasses. Every vegetable eaten is seasoned
with saltmeat, bacon or ham. Cornbread, made with pure cornmeal, is a
must with every meal, especially if there's pot liquor. And many
foods
are rolled in cornmeal before they are fried. Of course nothing makes
cornbread better than a spoon or two of bacon drippings and molasses.
For the sweetest pies and pones you ever sunk a tooth into, molasses
is the one ingredient you can't find a substitute for. And a little
bit of it, used on the side, can top off the flavors of most Southern
food, even a day-old biscuit.")

N.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-03-2012, 02:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,009
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 11:13:18 -0700 (PDT) in rec.food.cooking, Lenona
wrote,
On Mar 20, 1:29*pm, zxcvbob wrote:


I disagree with almost everything you said. *You're not *totally* off,
but mostly just listing stereotypes.


Sorry I didn't put in quotes......MICKLER was the author of what I
quoted.


It was clear to anyone who was paying attention.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-03-2012, 06:19 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 218
Default

That cookbook is around from many days. I think you have got it.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-04-2012, 02:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 173
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Mar 18, 1:37*pm, Lenona wrote:

The sequel was "Sinkin Spells, Hot Flashes, Fits and Cravins." (It has
a lot of recipes for mass gatherings, unlike the first. It also has
long tales by Southerners.)

There are also the books "The Treasury of White Trash Cooking" and
"White Trash Cooking II."

I found out that the main differences between "Sinkin Spells, Hot
Flashes, Fits and Cravins" and "The Treasury of White Trash Cooking"
is that the latter has 138 extra pages of recipes and an extra set of
photos. The former includes fan reviews, including ones from Harper
Lee and the late actress Helen Hayes. It also includes a preface by
the late North Carolina publisher Jonathan Williams.

What I want to know is, what, if anything, is different about "White
Trash Cooking II"?



Just thought I'd ask again. Does anyone know?

Lenona.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-04-2012, 03:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,546
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

Lenona wrote:

What I want to know is, what, if anything, is different about "White
Trash Cooking II"?


See Pandora's blog.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-04-2012, 03:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 5,466
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Mar 18, 6:29*pm, Don Martinich wrote:

'Netty Irene says, "It's no trouble at all! All you got to do is rench
'em out, wipe 'em out with a dishrag, and put 'em on the fire to dry
out
all the water. Then tear off a piece of grocery bag and fold it about
two inches square. Dab it in grease and smear it round 'n round the
bottom and sides 'til they're plenty covered. Let'em cool and hang 'em
on a nail." '

--------

That is exactly they way people in the rural parts of the Cumberland
River valley speak. My relatives, some of them, still talk that
way. It is exactly the way I was taught to treat cast iron...and
still do today. I don't use a grocery bag these days, I use a paper
towel. ;-)

I was born in East Tennessee, in Oak Ridge. We were not 'white
trash' but we weren't well to do by any means.
We had a big garden and chickens and raised a beef calf. We got our
milk from a old guy across the road who had
a couple of Jersey cows. My Dad was a millwright and my mom worked
in a textile mill. They looked down on
'white trash' which were people they considered beneath them because
they didn't ever seem to work and had
unpainted houses with old refrigerators and tires, etc., in the front
yard.

But the one thing everyone had in common was home cookin'. We did
eat 'good'. Big mess of greens, a ham hock and cornbread. Yum Yum.




  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-04-2012, 03:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 173
Default Question on "White Trash Cooking"

On Apr 30, 10:05*am, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:
Lenona wrote:

What I want to know is, what, if anything, is different about "White
Trash Cooking II"?


See Pandora's blog.


Er, there seems to be more than one - link, please?


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another "half-cooking" "recipe" Steve Freides[_2_] General Cooking 1 24-01-2013 06:03 AM
"White Heat" by Marco Pierre White - Does anyone own this book? Daniel Kwio General Cooking 7 03-09-2007 10:55 PM
What are your favorite cookbooks? "The Joy of Cooking", "The Way to Cook"? Kent General Cooking 41 09-06-2006 06:51 AM
"Trash Bag" Taco Salad Beth Layman Recipes (moderated) 0 14-02-2006 03:40 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:46 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017