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Old 11-03-2012, 07:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black & Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.

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Old 11-03-2012, 07:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 15:06:46 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.


A friend has the Technivorm, an excellent machine. I have
the Krups which at about $100 makes great coffee into a thermal
carafe.

For a fast and perfect cup of course the cafe presse is
the way to go. That is what I use for a single cup.



Mr. Coffee and Black & Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?


They are not worth the bother.


My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.



--
This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with
Negroes, entertainers, and any others. - Harry J. Anslinger
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Old 11-03-2012, 07:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 15:06:46 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black & Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?


NO! I bought a cheap B&D, the water came out at ~ 178-180 deg. The
coffee SUCKED. I threw it out after ~ 1 week.

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


A friend has a Cuisinart that sells at Costco for ~$50. MAde good
coffee I though.

-Zz
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 3/11/2012 3:06 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black& Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


I had a four-cup or two-mug Mr Coffee for twenty years. All I ever
replaced was the jug when I dropped it. The machine just stopped working
a couple of months ago and I could not find a replacement but I now have
a 5-cup Sears Kenwood (about $20) that functions identically and the
coffee is fine!

--
Jim Silverton

Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black & Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


I have the Cuisinart 1200 and like it.
http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DCC-...1498160&sr=8-1
I've compared it to French press coffee and I don't know if I can tell much
difference. The Technivorum was best rated in Cook's Illustrated sometime
back and it was felt it was best because the water heated consistently to
just over 200F, apparently the optimal temp. for the coffee to meet the
water.

The minute my coffee is done it goes into a thermal pot for the remainder of
the day. I think that's the secret. Heating after brewing destroys the
flavor.

Kent





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Old 11-03-2012, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?


Fresh ground coffee makes a difference, so I recommend you purchase
something with a built-in grinder. The shelf life of roasted coffee
beans is much longer than the shelf life of ground coffee.

Cuisinart makes something called a Grind-n-Brew which we used for many
years before switching to espresso, and we found it an excellent
machine. We did have a couple of problems with it but the customer
service from the company was exemplary - they replaced a few parts for
us and finally sent us an entirely new machine when ours was three years
old, all at no charge to us and all without any hassle. We still have
that machine and if we were to need to buy a new coffee maker again,
we'd buy another. They were $150 when we bought ours - looks like
they're $100 or less now.

-S-


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Old 11-03-2012, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sky Sky is offline
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On 3/11/2012 2:06 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black& Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


How about an espresso maker like this one I found on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Express-Stovet...498225&sr=8-13

or

http://tinyurl.com/7x9jwye

The coffee/espresso maker shown in the Amazon example is 6 cups
capacity. There are a few different sizes from one cup to 10+ cups.
Before gifted with an electric espresso maker (DeLonghi), I used this
sort of coffee maker to make a morning mocha. The only drawbacks were I
always made sure to A) keep an eye on the stove, and B) use the timer to
make sure I didn't get distracted while making coffee/espresso with this
stove-top method. HTH

Sky

--

Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 13:13:20 -0800, Mark Thorson
wrote:


I put the ground coffee in a big mug, pour the hot
water over it, stir, then pour into two glass jars
with filters folded over their mouths. There's no
support for the filters, but they're larger diameter
than the mouths of the jars, so folding the extra
material over the rim creates a collar that holds
them in place. I've tried filter funnels, but
they're way too slow. I use two jars to speed
things up even more. I rinse out the mug and pour
the two jars of filtered coffee into it.

Other than my coffee mug, a spoon, and two recycled
jars, no equipment is needed.


That is probably the all time best method, but I just can't picture my
wife doing that with a smile on her face. She sometimes uses a small
French press for a single cup and uses the four minutes steeping time.
I do that for my tea also.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 19:13:29 +0000 (UTC), Julian Macassey
wrote:




A friend has the Technivorm, an excellent machine. I have
the Krups which at about $100 makes great coffee into a thermal
carafe.


I'm anti-Krups though, after my recent experience with them.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 3/11/2012 4:45 PM, Steve Freides wrote:
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?


Fresh ground coffee makes a difference, so I recommend you purchase
something with a built-in grinder. The shelf life of roasted coffee
beans is much longer than the shelf life of ground coffee.

Cuisinart makes something called a Grind-n-Brew which we used for many
years before switching to espresso, and we found it an excellent
machine. We did have a couple of problems with it but the customer
service from the company was exemplary - they replaced a few parts for
us and finally sent us an entirely new machine when ours was three years
old, all at no charge to us and all without any hassle. We still have
that machine and if we were to need to buy a new coffee maker again,
we'd buy another. They were $150 when we bought ours - looks like
they're $100 or less now.

I found that the $20 Cuisinart coffee grinder works well with my (about
$20) Mr Coffee and also with its replacement the similarly priced Sears
that I mentioned. Despite what others have said in the past, I keep the
beans in the freezer and I've not noticed any lack of flavor. It's true
that I don't keep the prepared coffee warm but I only drink one mug
after dinner and one at breakfast, which is half the previous night's
coffee heated in the microwave for a minute and a half.


--
Jim Silverton

Extraneous "not" in Reply To.


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Old 11-03-2012, 08:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 3/11/2012 9:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black& Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


I've tried all kinds of brewers. At one time, my favorite method was to
use one of those cheap percolators that you use on camping trips. They
are best at filling the area with a great smell which the others don't
do so well at.

These days skip the gimmicks and just use a couple of cheap automatic
drip coffeemakers and canned stuff cause what I really want is a
non-harsh brew with little fuss. My method is to not put the carafe in
place until the water has a chance to pool and saturate the grounds.
Sometimes I get distracted and forget to put the carafe back in time -
that's always exciting. :-)
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 15:06:46 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I know this comes up from time to time, but what are your feelings
about coffee makers these days? French press still seems to be a
favorite, but what about the high end drips?

Technivorm seems to have better ratings than most, but is approaching
$300. It is made in the Netherlands though, a big plus.
http://www.wholelattelove.com/Techni...orm_thermo.cfm

Most every other brand has some good ratings, but also some really
bad ones from people with terrible experiences.

Bunn makes coffee fast, but does not seem to be hot enough for some.

Mr. Coffee and Black & Decker still have $19.95 models that sell by
the millions. Are they worth it?

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.

My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


AFAIC, a French press is only good for dinner parties. I've used Mr.
Coffee at work. I don't have a problem with the way it brews coffee,
but my home coffee makers have always been a step up from Mr C. DD
gave me an $80-100 Krups two Christmas's ago after the heater on my
old one got weak and I got tired of drinking lukewarm coffee.
Frankly, other than how hot the coffee is - I can't tell the
difference. It's much nicer looking than a Mr. Coffee, but the
quality of a pot of coffee depends on what quality the coffee you
start with is and how much of it you use per cup.

FWIW, my favorite coffee shop hand drips each cup individually and
theirs is superb - so you might want to consider going back to the old
fashioned hand drip method and dripping it directly into a thermal
carafe for better heat retention.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 16:57:30 -0400, James Silverton
wrote:

I found that the $20 Cuisinart coffee grinder works well with my (about
$20) Mr Coffee and also with its replacement the similarly priced Sears
that I mentioned. Despite what others have said in the past, I keep the
beans in the freezer and I've not noticed any lack of flavor.


Agreed. I keep both whole beans and ground in the freezer and they're
fine. I buy them very fresh and they stay fresh there. Love my $20
Cuisinart coffee grinder too!

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Has anyone had a big revelation? Such as I should have spent the
extra money and bought xxx years ago, it is well worth the cost. Or,
It was a waste to spend so much because the $20 Mr. C makes just a
good a cup for a lot less.


I take coffee fairly seriously. I buy green beans
and roast them myself. So what do I brew in?

I put the ground coffee in a big mug, pour the hot
water over it, stir, then pour into two glass jars
with filters folded over their mouths. There's no
support for the filters, but they're larger diameter
than the mouths of the jars, so folding the extra
material over the rim creates a collar that holds
them in place. I've tried filter funnels, but
they're way too slow. I use two jars to speed
things up even more. I rinse out the mug and pour
the two jars of filtered coffee into it.

Other than my coffee mug, a spoon, and two recycled
jars, no equipment is needed.

I've heard that coffee should be steeped for four
minutes, but after stirring I pour the coffee into
the filters immediately. I've tried steeping, but
I haven't found any difference in doing that, except
it makes the mug too hot to hold comfortably.

I drink quite a bit of coffee these days, about 4
or 5 mugs of very strong coffee daily.
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 11 Mar 2012 15:06:46 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
snip


My wife mentioned that she'd like to have something other that what
she now uses. Faster and easier to pour without spilling. Personally,
I have a cup of tea instead.


I use a manual, glass Mellita coffee carafe. I grind the beans in a
grinder. Fill the tea kettle with water. I measure coffee grounds
into the cone that holds a paper filter over the carafe. When the tea
kettle is just about to whistle, I pour the water over the grounds.
I have never liked the coffee from machines that brew automatically.
There is no dripping with my Mellita. All parts can go into the dish
washer. I'm pretty sure the pot costs less that $20. I don't know
for sure as I have stock piled several in case of breakage. I suppose
some day when I am older and don't want to fuss I might go to
pre-ground coffee in an automatic machine. Probably though I will
give up coffee first.
Janet US


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