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Old 03-02-2012, 05:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!

This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.

I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?

Felice



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Old 03-02-2012, 05:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

Felice wrote:

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!

This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.

I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?


It's probably peanut oil in its natural form.
Planter's may have been a "winterized" oil,
i.e. oil that has been chilled and filtered
to remove the part which solidifies first
at low temperatures.

Note that peanut oil is high in saturated fat
compared to most other vegetable oils (but still
much lower than coconut oil). This makes it a
good frying oil, but it's atherogenic (bad for
your arteries).
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Old 03-02-2012, 05:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

On Feb 3, 9:45*am, Mark Thorson wrote:
Felice wrote:

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!


This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod *delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.


I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?


I have never seen anything other than golden peanut oil, whether
Planters, Hollywood, or house brand.


It's probably peanut oil in its natural form.
Planter's may have been a "winterized" oil,
i.e. oil that has been chilled and filtered
to remove the part which solidifies first
at low temperatures.

Note that peanut oil is high in saturated fat
compared to most other vegetable oils (but still
much lower than coconut oil). *This makes it a
good frying oil, but it's atherogenic (bad for
your arteries).


This is bullshit. Compared to olive oil, 100 grams of peanut oil has
just three more grams of saturated fat. The big advantage of peanut
oil is its percentage of monounsaturated fat, second only to olive
oil, and 50 to 100% more than other vegetable oils.
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Old 03-02-2012, 06:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance (never mind!)

"Felice" wrote in message

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to
disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!

This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.

I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?

Felice


Oops, sorry. I just took another look at the peanut oil and it looks
just fine. My guess is that it was exposed to extreme cold before
delivery and suffered a bit of a chill. Thanks anyhow!

Felice



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Old 03-02-2012, 07:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

"Felice" wrote:

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!

This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.

I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?

Felice


I'd send it back.
That description is of no peanut oil I ever saw... opaque, milky
white, and viscous... maybe by mistake you ordered penis oil.
Maybe not by mistake! hehe




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Old 03-02-2012, 07:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

On 03/02/2012 12:45 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:

Note that peanut oil is high in saturated fat
compared to most other vegetable oils (but still
much lower than coconut oil). This makes it a
good frying oil, but it's atherogenic (bad for
your arteries).




It is not that bad. It is a little higher than other relatively cheap
and available oils, like olive, corn or sunflower oil, or safflower. It
is a lot lower than margarine, lard, butter, palm oil or coconut oil.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

On Fri, 3 Feb 2012 12:36:06 -0500, "Felice"
wrote:

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!

This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.

I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?

Felice

It may just be cold. I've had that happen to peanut oil I have stored
in an unheated room
janet us
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance (never mind!)


"Felice" wrote in message
...
"Felice" wrote in message

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!

This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.

I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?

Felice


Oops, sorry. I just took another look at the peanut oil and it looks just
fine. My guess is that it was exposed to extreme cold before delivery and
suffered a bit of a chill. Thanks anyhow!

Felice


My garage stored lg. bottle of EVOO looked similar and cleared up when it
spent the night in the pantry. It tastes fine. You can find peanut oil in
large containers in a Chinese market if there's one near you.

Kent



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Old 04-02-2012, 02:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

Dave Smith wrote:

On 03/02/2012 12:45 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:

Note that peanut oil is high in saturated fat
compared to most other vegetable oils (but still
much lower than coconut oil). This makes it a
good frying oil, but it's atherogenic (bad for
your arteries).


It is not that bad. It is a little higher than other relatively cheap
and available oils, like olive, corn or sunflower oil, or safflower. It
is a lot lower than margarine, lard, butter, palm oil or coconut oil.


I was pretty sure you were wrong, but I just
checked Wikipedia and you're right. It's only
a little bit higher in saturated fat -- an
insignificant amount.

I thought I was accurately remembering the fat
percentages I've seen on the labels of vegetable
oils, but I wasn't -- unless they've changed the
way saturated fat is measured in the last 30 years.
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance

On Feb 3, 11:45*am, Mark Thorson wrote:
Felice wrote:

For the years I used Planters peanut oil (until it seemed to disappear
from the shelves) it had always been clear, yellow and liquid. You
know, like oil!


This week I ordered a house brand (they didn't have Planters) from
Stop & Ship via Peapod *delivery service. and it is markedly
different: almost opaque, milky white, and viscous.


I'm hesitant to open it. Is this is a "new improved" product? Is the
different appearance due to a new processing method? Or is it bad
batch? Can anyone shed any light on this?


It's probably peanut oil in its natural form.
Planter's may have been a "winterized" oil,
i.e. oil that has been chilled and filtered
to remove the part which solidifies first
at low temperatures.

Note that peanut oil is high in saturated fat
compared to most other vegetable oils (but still
much lower than coconut oil). *This makes it a
good frying oil, but it's atherogenic (bad for
your arteries).


10% palmitic acid is not a big deal. It is primarily oleic, which is
good for HDL/LDL balance. It's the cheapest of the decent oils. I'd
be more concerned with the high levels of Omega 6, but for frying
something like fish, where you're going to toss most of it, I am just
too frugal to use my pecan oil, and prefer the neutral taste to even
the lightest of olive oils. The least atherogenic oil is macadamia,
and if you can afford it, I encourage you to use it, but disparaging
peanut or even coconut oil for frying is silly. Not all saturated
fats are bad, and not all polyunsaturates are good.

--Bryan


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Old 04-02-2012, 06:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance (never mind!)

Sqwertz wrote:

That list I posted shows Supremo EVOO costs less than regular olive
oil. When I see stuff like that it makes me wonder.


I bought their house brand tahini (probably from Atlanta One) and was
disappointed. How can ground up sesame seeds be the consistency of a
warm milkshake? I suspect it was watered down, possibly using a cheap
oil.


TJ's sells a "Tahini sauce" that is nothing like normal tahini,
which should have approximately the form factor of pure peanut butter --
sticky stuff with maybe some oil separating.

I routinely put (real) tahini into yogurt, cottage cheese, or
kefir when I am snacking on same. I normally only buy a jar
when I'm planning on making babaganous, but then I use it up
for other stuff in short order.


Steve
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance (never mind!)

Sqwertz wrote:

Or heck, the Bertolli was just $1 more per liter. I'll probably do
that.


I'm deeply suspicious of Bertolli olive oil.
Years ago, I used to keep my olive oil in the
refrigerator, and generally a large proportion
would become semi-solid. Bertolli was unusual
in that the proportion was much smaller. It
just didn't behave the way I expected pure olive
oil to behave. That's what made me suspicious.
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Old 05-02-2012, 12:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance (never mind!)

On Sat, 04 Feb 2012 13:50:57 -0800, Mark Thorson
wrote:

Sqwertz wrote:

Or heck, the Bertolli was just $1 more per liter. I'll probably do
that.


I'm deeply suspicious of Bertolli olive oil.
Years ago, I used to keep my olive oil in the
refrigerator, and generally a large proportion
would become semi-solid. Bertolli was unusual
in that the proportion was much smaller. It
just didn't behave the way I expected pure olive
oil to behave. That's what made me suspicious.


You don't have to worry about Bertolli at least here in California.
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/jul...e-oil-20100715

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Old 05-02-2012, 03:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Peanut oil appearance (never mind!)

On Sat, 4 Feb 2012 18:53:35 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Sat, 04 Feb 2012 13:50:57 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

Sqwertz wrote:

Or heck, the Bertolli was just $1 more per liter. I'll probably do
that.


I'm deeply suspicious of Bertolli olive oil.
Years ago, I used to keep my olive oil in the
refrigerator, and generally a large proportion
would become semi-solid. Bertolli was unusual
in that the proportion was much smaller. It
just didn't behave the way I expected pure olive
oil to behave. That's what made me suspicious.


Fortunately, I don't give your opinions any credit. If anything, it
has made me want to buy it even more.

Sheldon, what do YOU think of Bertolli EVOO?


Bertolli is a decent EVOO, but it's not consistant. I most often buy
Goya EVOO, from Spain... never been disappointed. For cooking I buy
EVOO from Walmart, it's inexpensive and works fine for rubbing a
roast, pan frying pork chops etc., and for seasoned salad dressings.
But for drizzling on a composed salad or on bread I prefer Goya. I
see no point in using primo olive oils vinaigrettes, that's like using
top shelf booze for mixed drinks. I'm not fond of Italian EVOO, I've
bought some pricy estate oils and they sucked. I'm sure most Italian
EVOO are blends and otherwise misrepresented. With Italian food
products of all kinds you're mostly paying for fancy schmancy
packaging... they do have the nicest looking tins and bottles. I
think most Italian table cheeses are way over rated too, their grating
cheeses are fine but not their table cheeses... other than mozz,
provolone, and gorgonzola the rest are not memorable. I think most
Italian style food products made in the US, especially sausage and
other cured meat, is better. Even the dago red fermented in Brooklyn
basements is better than anything bottled in Italy. And there is no
good seafood in the warm waters of the Med. And no one brews worse
coffee than an Italian, they should be forbidden to touch coffee
beans. If you want good coffee, that's one thing a-rabs can do well.
Italians are good bakers, they make good bread and their pastries are
far better than anthing made by the French. One would think the
French should have great olive oils but we never hear about it.
Nowadays the best olive oil is from California.
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Default Trader Joe's (was Peanut oil appearance (never mind!))

Marty wrote:

After spending hundreds of dollars at the new TJs here, I may have found
five items I would go back to buy, plus the cheap wine. I also found a whole
lot of ho hum marginal stuff and a number of things that totally sucked
eggs.


Trader Joe's no longer carries some of the items I used to really enjoy
from them. They used to sell a Cuban simmer sauce which was really
outstanding. They used to sell a brand of white chocolate
(Swartenbroekx? Something like that) which I really liked because unlike
most other white chocolates out there, it wasn't waxy.

Now I go there for candied ginger, cashews, and some dried fruit. If a
particular wine, beer, or cider catches my eye I might buy that too. But
those trips are few and far between; the merchandise doesn't usually
justify the trip.

Bob


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