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Old 27-12-2011, 01:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some peppercorns?

I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



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Old 27-12-2011, 01:45 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Dec 26, 4:44*pm, "Christopher M." wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some peppercorns?

I have a ****y little pepper grinder.

W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Enough torque to grind the pepper. On some grinders you can adjsut
from course to fine.
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Old 27-12-2011, 03:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Dec 26, 7:44*pm, "Christopher M." wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some peppercorns?

I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


It depends on the mill. A good deal less than a foot-pound.

Jerry
--
"I view the progress of science as being the slow erosion of the
tendency to dichotomize." Barbara Smuts, U. Mich.
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Old 27-12-2011, 08:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 26, 7:44 pm, "Christopher M." wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some
peppercorns?

I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


It depends on the mill. A good deal less than a foot-pound.

Jerry


Thanks Jerry. I think my problem was that I was grinding the pepper too
fine.

I'm grinding it a little coarser now.

Coarse pepper has more flavor. Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in the
supermarket.


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


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Old 27-12-2011, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Dec 27, 11:26*am, "Christopher M."
wrote:
Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 26, 7:44 pm, "Christopher M." wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some
peppercorns?


I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


It depends on the mill. A good deal less than a foot-pound.


Jerry


Thanks Jerry. I think my problem was that I was grinding the pepper too
fine.

I'm grinding it a little coarser now.

Coarse pepper has more flavor. Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in the
supermarket.

W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


How long did it take you to figure that out?


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Old 27-12-2011, 09:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 14:26:49 -0500, "Christopher M."
wrote:


Coarse pepper has more flavor.


It certainly does.

Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in the supermarket.


Where have you been? The supermarket carries coarser ground pepper.
They even have cracked pepper, which no one can complain about because
your teeth grind it up and you'll get quite a blast of pepper if
you're not ready for it.

--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.
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Old 27-12-2011, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On 12/27/2011 10:18 AM, sf wrote:
On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 14:26:49 -0500, "Christopher M."
wrote:


Coarse pepper has more flavor.


It certainly does.

Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in the supermarket.


Where have you been? The supermarket carries coarser ground pepper.
They even have cracked pepper, which no one can complain about because
your teeth grind it up and you'll get quite a blast of pepper if
you're not ready for it.


A guy from Texas sent me a small medicine bottle of dried chile piquin.
These are about the same size as peppercorns but they are rather hot. I
used to add them whole to my bowls of chili and savor the little bombs
of intense heat that lasted a few seconds and then faded rapidly away.
The guy was a little surprised that I ate them whole because the
Mexicans crush them before they sprinkle it on their food. What the
heck, it works for me.

If you like intense heat, you should experience these. The ones I'm
talking about are the round, dry, ones not the elongated ones. I wish I
could carry them with me everywhere to liven up boring dishes.
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Old 27-12-2011, 10:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Dec 27, 1:44*pm, dsi1 wrote:
On 12/27/2011 10:18 AM, sf wrote:

On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 14:26:49 -0500, "Christopher M."
*wrote:


Coarse pepper has more flavor.


It certainly does.


Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in the supermarket.


Where have you been? *The supermarket carries coarser ground pepper.
They even have cracked pepper, which no one can complain about because
your teeth grind it up and you'll get quite a blast of pepper if
you're not ready for it.


A guy from Texas sent me a small medicine bottle of dried chile piquin.
These are about the same size as peppercorns but they are rather hot. I
used to add them whole to my bowls of chili and savor the little bombs
of intense heat that lasted a few seconds and then faded rapidly away.
The guy was a little surprised that I ate them whole because the
Mexicans crush them before they sprinkle it on their food. What the
heck, it works for me.

If you like intense heat, you should experience these. The ones I'm
talking about are the round, dry, ones not the elongated ones. I wish I
could carry them with me everywhere to liven up boring dishes.


Well, there's no reason you can't take them wherever you want.
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Old 28-12-2011, 04:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 27, 2:26 pm, "Christopher M." wrote:
Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 26, 7:44 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some
peppercorns?


I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


It depends on the mill. A good deal less than a foot-pound.


Jerry


Thanks Jerry. I think my problem was that I was grinding the pepper
too fine.

I'm grinding it a little coarser now.

Coarse pepper has more flavor. Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in
the supermarket.


Your experience may depend on the variety of pepper, but I suspect
that you may have set the mill so fine that the two burrs were in
contact and you were trying to grind steel. I like a very fine grind
for most dishes.

The aroma, but not the sharpness, dissipates quickly in air, which is
why I use a mill in the first place. Skeptics should try this: use two
small dishes. Grind some pepper into one and let it sit for a day.
Then, without resetting the mill, grind a like amount into the other.
Sniff at each, and the older one should be evident. What we perceive
as taste has an aroma component, and the stale pepper is just less
pungent.


Ground pepper does get moldy very quickly. I think I read that it's one of
the moldiest things in the kitchen.

The most aromatic pepper of all is prepared in a mortar, not a mill.
The pounding expresses the aromatic oil and gives the result
remarkable pungency. I don't bother for a little bit, but when a
recipe calls for half a teaspoon or more, my mortar is actually
quicker. The conversion is simple: a teaspoon of peppercorns pounds up
to a teaspoon of ground pepper.


Pounding is one way to use a mortar. Another way is to move the handle of
the pestle, in a circular motion, around the top edge of the mortar while
the bottom of the pestle slides against the opposite bottom edge of the
mortar. If the mortar is shaped correctly, the pestle should move seamlessly
along the bottom edge. But most mortars are junk.


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


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Old 28-12-2011, 04:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

dsi1 wrote:
On 12/27/2011 10:18 AM, sf wrote:
On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 14:26:49 -0500, "Christopher M."
wrote:


Coarse pepper has more flavor.


It certainly does.

Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in the supermarket.


Where have you been? The supermarket carries coarser ground pepper.
They even have cracked pepper, which no one can complain about
because your teeth grind it up and you'll get quite a blast of
pepper if you're not ready for it.


A guy from Texas sent me a small medicine bottle of dried chile
piquin. These are about the same size as peppercorns but they are
rather hot. I used to add them whole to my bowls of chili and savor
the little bombs of intense heat that lasted a few seconds and then
faded rapidly away. The guy was a little surprised that I ate them
whole because the Mexicans crush them before they sprinkle it on
their food. What the heck, it works for me.


You forgot to mention that Mexicans wash their hands, after they crush the
chiles, to avoid skin burns.

I don't have much of a tolerance for pepper myself. Too much spicy food
would destroy the good bacteria in my digestive system. I eat a lot of
Activia yogurt.


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)




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Old 28-12-2011, 04:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Dec 27, 10:09*pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 27, 2:26 pm, "Christopher M." wrote:
Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 26, 7:44 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some
peppercorns?


I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


It depends on the mill. A good deal less than a foot-pound.


Jerry


Thanks Jerry. I think my problem was that I was grinding the pepper
too fine.


I'm grinding it a little coarser now.


Coarse pepper has more flavor. Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in
the supermarket.


Your experience may depend on the variety of pepper, but I suspect
that you may have set the mill so fine that the two burrs were in
contact and you were trying to grind steel. I like a very fine grind
for most dishes.


The aroma, but not the sharpness, dissipates quickly in air, which is
why I use a mill in the first place. Skeptics should try this: use two
small dishes. Grind some pepper into one and let it sit for a day.
Then, without resetting the mill, grind a like amount into the other.
Sniff at each, and the older one should be evident. What we perceive
as taste has an aroma component, and the stale pepper is just less
pungent.


Ground pepper does get moldy very quickly. I think I read that it's one of
the moldiest things in the kitchen.

The most aromatic pepper of all is prepared in a mortar, not a mill.
The pounding expresses the aromatic oil and gives the result
remarkable pungency. I don't bother for a little bit, but when a
recipe calls for half a teaspoon or more, my mortar is actually
quicker. The conversion is simple: a teaspoon of peppercorns pounds up
to a teaspoon of ground pepper.


Pounding is one way to use a mortar. Another way is to move the handle of
the pestle, in a circular motion, around the top edge of the mortar while
the bottom of the pestle slides against the opposite bottom edge of the
mortar. If the mortar is shaped correctly, the pestle should move seamlessly
along the bottom edge. But most mortars are junk.


Peppercorns and poppy seeds are too hard for that technique. For
pepper, I use a tall brass mortar deeper tan it is wide, and I still
need a cover to keep the pepper from scattering. I use the plastic top
of a coffee can with a hole in it for the pestle. It works like a
charm.

Jerry
--
"I view the progress of science as being the slow erosion of the
tendency to dichotomize." Barbara Smuts, U. Mich.
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Old 28-12-2011, 05:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 27, 10:09 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 27, 2:26 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
Jerry Avins wrote:
On Dec 26, 7:44 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
What kind of torque do I need to get a good grind on some
peppercorns?


I have a ****y little pepper grinder.


It depends on the mill. A good deal less than a foot-pound.


Jerry


Thanks Jerry. I think my problem was that I was grinding the pepper
too fine.


I'm grinding it a little coarser now.


Coarse pepper has more flavor. Fine pepper tastes like the stuff in
the supermarket.


Your experience may depend on the variety of pepper, but I suspect
that you may have set the mill so fine that the two burrs were in
contact and you were trying to grind steel. I like a very fine grind
for most dishes.


The aroma, but not the sharpness, dissipates quickly in air, which
is why I use a mill in the first place. Skeptics should try this:
use two small dishes. Grind some pepper into one and let it sit for
a day. Then, without resetting the mill, grind a like amount into
the other. Sniff at each, and the older one should be evident. What
we perceive as taste has an aroma component, and the stale pepper
is just less pungent.


Ground pepper does get moldy very quickly. I think I read that it's
one of the moldiest things in the kitchen.

The most aromatic pepper of all is prepared in a mortar, not a mill.
The pounding expresses the aromatic oil and gives the result
remarkable pungency. I don't bother for a little bit, but when a
recipe calls for half a teaspoon or more, my mortar is actually
quicker. The conversion is simple: a teaspoon of peppercorns pounds
up to a teaspoon of ground pepper.


Pounding is one way to use a mortar. Another way is to move the
handle of the pestle, in a circular motion, around the top edge of
the mortar while the bottom of the pestle slides against the
opposite bottom edge of the mortar. If the mortar is shaped
correctly, the pestle should move seamlessly along the bottom edge.
But most mortars are junk.


Peppercorns and poppy seeds are too hard for that technique. For
pepper, I use a tall brass mortar deeper tan it is wide, and I still
need a cover to keep the pepper from scattering. I use the plastic top
of a coffee can with a hole in it for the pestle. It works like a
charm.


That's some badass hardware.


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


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Old 28-12-2011, 05:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On 12/27/2011 10:14 PM, Christopher M. wrote:

I don't have much of a tolerance for pepper myself. Too much spicy food
would destroy the good bacteria in my digestive system. I eat a lot of
Activia yogurt.


If you pay attention to the Activia commercials closely, they say it can
maintain good bacteria in the gut if eaten 3 times a day.
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Old 28-12-2011, 05:45 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On 12/27/2011 10:41 PM, Jerry Avins wrote:

Peppercorns and poppy seeds are too hard for that technique. For
pepper, I use a tall brass mortar deeper tan it is wide, and I still
need a cover to keep the pepper from scattering. I use the plastic top
of a coffee can with a hole in it for the pestle. It works like a
charm.


Great idea, Jerry!
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Old 28-12-2011, 07:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pepper Grinder Torque?

On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 13:55:40 -0800 (PST), Chemo the Clown
wrote:

On Dec 27, 1:44*pm, dsi1 wrote:
On 12/27/2011 10:18 AM, sf wrote:


A guy from Texas sent me a small medicine bottle of dried chile piquin.
These are about the same size as peppercorns but they are rather hot. I
used to add them whole to my bowls of chili and savor the little bombs
of intense heat that lasted a few seconds and then faded rapidly away.
The guy was a little surprised that I ate them whole because the
Mexicans crush them before they sprinkle it on their food. What the
heck, it works for me.

If you like intense heat, you should experience these. The ones I'm
talking about are the round, dry, ones not the elongated ones. I wish I
could carry them with me everywhere to liven up boring dishes.


Well, there's no reason you can't take them wherever you want.


He probably can't get them in Hawaii and if he's anything like me, he
counts shipping as part of the cost; so they're probably out of the
question as far as money goes.
--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.


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