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Old 08-06-2011, 07:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dinner 2011-06-07

Thai-inspired braised beef: brisket, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, orange
juice, garlic, ginger, turmeric, coconut milk, lemon juice, and kaffir
lime leaves

Spiced brown rice: brown rice, star anise, coriander seeds, cumin
seeds, nutmeg, cardamom pods, shallots, coconut milk, and ketjap manis

Stir-fried greens with garlic: Choy sum, garlic, grapeseed oil

Mango sambal: mango, red onion, Fresno chiles, brown mustard seeds,
grapeseed oil, garlic, and cilantro

Thai-inspired eggplant: globe eggplant, turmeric, serrano chiles,
lemon juice, tamarind paste, shallots, water, and coconut milk


Bob

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Old 08-06-2011, 09:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dinner 2011-06-07

On Tue, 07 Jun 2011 23:20:10 -0700, Bob Terwilliger
wrote:

Mango sambal: mango, red onion, Fresno chiles, brown mustard seeds,
grapeseed oil, garlic, and cilantro


Was this something you made? If so, would you please post the recipe
here? It sounds interesting! Does it keep or do you have to use it
as quickly as you would a mango salsa?

--

Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.
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Old 09-06-2011, 06:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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sf wrote:

Mango sambal: mango, red onion, Fresno chiles, brown mustard seeds,
grapeseed oil, garlic, and cilantro


Was this something you made? If so, would you please post the recipe
here? It sounds interesting! Does it keep or do you have to use it
as quickly as you would a mango salsa?


Yes, I made it. Yes, it's quite perishable. The original recipe is in
_Salsas, Sambals, Chutneys, and Chowchows_ by Christopher Schlesinger. I
wasn't able to find the book when I looked for it today, but here's the
general method:


Cut up a big ripe mango.
Dice a red onion.
Mince a Fresno chile.
Mince a garlic clove.
Chop a handful of cilantro leaves.

Heat grapeseed oil in a pan. Add brown mustard seeds (about a tablespoon)
and cook over medium-high heat until the mustard seeds begin to pop. Add the
onion and cook until softened. Lower the heat to medium, add the chopped
chile and garlic, and cook until the garlic turns fragrant, about 15
seconds. Add the chopped mango. Grate on a quarter-teaspoon of NUTMEG --
that's right, NUTMEG! The bane of your kitchen! :-) Cook briefly until the
mango softens, then add half a teaspoon of fish sauce (or more, to taste).
Cook until the flavors blend, about two minutes. Remove from the heat. Allow
to cool for a couple minutes, then stir in chopped cilantro. Taste, and if
you think the flavors need "brightening" add the juice of one lime. (In this
case, the mango was a bit underripe, so it needed longer-than-usual cooking,
and the final sambal did not need the
lime juice.)

Bob


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Old 12-06-2011, 02:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default PING sf Dinner 2011-06-07

I wrote:

Yes, I made it. Yes, it's quite perishable. The original recipe is in
_Salsas, Sambals, Chutneys, and Chowchows_ by Christopher Schlesinger. I
wasn't able to find the book when I looked for it today, but here's the
general method:


Cut up a big ripe mango.
Dice a red onion.
Mince a Fresno chile.
Mince a garlic clove.
Chop a handful of cilantro leaves.

Heat grapeseed oil in a pan. Add brown mustard seeds (about a tablespoon)
and cook over medium-high heat until the mustard seeds begin to pop. Add
the onion and cook until softened. Lower the heat to medium, add the
chopped chile and garlic, and cook until the garlic turns fragrant, about
15 seconds. Add the chopped mango. Grate on a quarter-teaspoon of
NUTMEG -- that's right, NUTMEG! The bane of your kitchen! :-) Cook briefly
until the mango softens, then add half a teaspoon of fish sauce (or more,
to taste). Cook until the flavors blend, about two minutes. Remove from
the heat. Allow to cool for a couple minutes, then stir in chopped
cilantro. Taste, and if you think the flavors need "brightening" add the
juice of one lime. (In this case, the mango was a bit underripe, so it
needed longer-than-usual cooking, and the final sambal did not need the
lime juice.)


Well, I found the recipe, though it wasn't in the book I thought contained
it. (It's actually in _Big Flavors of the Hot Sun_ by Christopher
Schlesinger.) The method I give above leaves out molasses and white vinegar,
which appear in the original recipe. That recipe also does *not* contain the
mustard seeds; that was a tweak I came up with the first time I made the
sambal (about 15 years ago), and I've kept it ever since because I like the
added flavor and texture the mustard seeds add.

Bob


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Old 12-06-2011, 06:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default PING sf Dinner 2011-06-07

On Sat, 11 Jun 2011 18:13:04 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:

I wrote:

Yes, I made it. Yes, it's quite perishable. The original recipe is in
_Salsas, Sambals, Chutneys, and Chowchows_ by Christopher Schlesinger. I
wasn't able to find the book when I looked for it today, but here's the
general method:


Cut up a big ripe mango.
Dice a red onion.
Mince a Fresno chile.
Mince a garlic clove.
Chop a handful of cilantro leaves.

Heat grapeseed oil in a pan. Add brown mustard seeds (about a tablespoon)
and cook over medium-high heat until the mustard seeds begin to pop. Add
the onion and cook until softened. Lower the heat to medium, add the
chopped chile and garlic, and cook until the garlic turns fragrant, about
15 seconds. Add the chopped mango. Grate on a quarter-teaspoon of
NUTMEG -- that's right, NUTMEG! The bane of your kitchen! :-) Cook briefly
until the mango softens, then add half a teaspoon of fish sauce (or more,
to taste). Cook until the flavors blend, about two minutes. Remove from
the heat. Allow to cool for a couple minutes, then stir in chopped
cilantro. Taste, and if you think the flavors need "brightening" add the
juice of one lime. (In this case, the mango was a bit underripe, so it
needed longer-than-usual cooking, and the final sambal did not need the
lime juice.)


Well, I found the recipe, though it wasn't in the book I thought contained
it. (It's actually in _Big Flavors of the Hot Sun_ by Christopher
Schlesinger.) The method I give above leaves out molasses and white vinegar,
which appear in the original recipe. That recipe also does *not* contain the
mustard seeds; that was a tweak I came up with the first time I made the
sambal (about 15 years ago), and I've kept it ever since because I like the
added flavor and texture the mustard seeds add.

Thanks for the follow up, Bob! It really does sound good... Of
course nutmeg will be the optional ingredient (but this cook can
always grate on as little as humanly possible or substitute allspice).


On the bright side, I am visualizing it with grilled lamb. drool

--

Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.


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