General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2011, 06:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 180
Default Alton Brown jerky

Alton uses a fan with no heater to dry the meat. The recipe doesn't say
anything about cooking, and neither do many others. Some call for a
dehydrator and merely 'recommend' that it has a heater. Isn't cooking
mandatory?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html


--

Reply in group, but if emailing add one more
zero, and remove the last word.



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2011, 06:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,244
Default Alton Brown jerky

On 6/5/2011 1:16 PM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Alton uses a fan with no heater to dry the meat. The recipe doesn't say
anything about cooking, and neither do many others. Some call for a
dehydrator and merely 'recommend' that it has a heater. Isn't cooking
mandatory?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html


From what I know it isn't. The main consideration when making jerky is
to make sure you get a uniform low moisture content. Then nasties can't
grow.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2011, 06:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,065
Default Alton Brown jerky

On Jun 5, 1:54*pm, George wrote:
On 6/5/2011 1:16 PM, Tom Del Rosso wrote: Alton uses a fan with no heater to dry the meat. *The recipe doesn't say
anything about cooking, and neither do many others. *Some call for a
dehydrator and merely 'recommend' that it has a heater. *Isn't cooking
mandatory?


http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ky-recipe/inde...


*From what I know it isn't. The main consideration when making jerky is
to make sure you get a uniform low moisture content. Then nasties can't
grow.


Why is it called "jerky"? After all, mummies don't jerk.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-06-2011, 08:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 848
Default Alton Brown jerky

On 6/5/2011 7:16 AM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Alton uses a fan with no heater to dry the meat. The recipe doesn't say
anything about cooking, and neither do many others. Some call for a
dehydrator and merely 'recommend' that it has a heater. Isn't cooking
mandatory?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html



All the directions for jerky that I've seen call for air drying, no
cooking. I've made jerky in the oven at low temperatures but that's only
to speed up the drying. The simplest way to make jerky is to salt and
pepper the meat and lay it out in the sun. My guess is that most folks
will make a screen enclosure to keep out critters.

I suspect that pork jerky might be cooked because the texture seems to
be different.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-06-2011, 06:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,297
Default Alton Brown jerky

In article ,
"Tom Del Rosso" wrote:

Alton uses a fan with no heater to dry the meat. The recipe doesn't say
anything about cooking, and neither do many others. Some call for a
dehydrator and merely 'recommend' that it has a heater. Isn't cooking
mandatory?


I've made a lot of jerky out of venison and some from duck. It's been
twenty five years since my last batch. My memory is foggy, except I
sliced the meat to about 1/8 inch, brined it with salt and a bit of soy
sauce for about a day, coarse peppered hell out of it to discourage
flies and hung it in the garage over fishing line during the fall when
temps didn't freeze much nor heat up to much more than seventy F. There
was no cooking. It took one to two weeks hanging out of direct sunlight
in our dry climate. I never saw a fly come close to it.
Puddle ducks make much better jerky than diving ducks from my
experience. Avoid a Ruddy Duck.
I did it. It was good. I'm alive. However, your milage may vary.
I quit making jerky when I quit shooting deer. I didn't quit shooting
deer for any moral reason.

leo


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 09:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,620
Default Alton Brown jerky

the sanitation is what would bother me, and i think shink might have a jerky
for the cats, i know she gives hers some kind, Lee
"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
Leonard Blaisdell wrote:

In article ,
"Tom Del Rosso" wrote:

Alton uses a fan with no heater to dry the meat. The recipe doesn't
say
anything about cooking, and neither do many others. Some call for a
dehydrator and merely 'recommend' that it has a heater. Isn't cooking
mandatory?


I've made a lot of jerky out of venison and some from duck. It's been
twenty five years since my last batch. My memory is foggy, except I
sliced the meat to about 1/8 inch, brined it with salt and a bit of soy
sauce for about a day, coarse peppered hell out of it to discourage
flies and hung it in the garage over fishing line during the fall when
temps didn't freeze much nor heat up to much more than seventy F. There
was no cooking. It took one to two weeks hanging out of direct sunlight
in our dry climate. I never saw a fly come close to it.
Puddle ducks make much better jerky than diving ducks from my
experience. Avoid a Ruddy Duck.
I did it. It was good. I'm alive. However, your milage may vary.
I quit making jerky when I quit shooting deer. I didn't quit shooting
deer for any moral reason.

leo


Home made jerky is generally the best and not all full of the crap they
tend to put in jerky for people.

This is my favorite commercial jerky and it comes in chicken and duck,
has no chemical additives, sugar, salt or Nitrates, and is about 1/2 the
price of jerky for humans. I'm buying a different brand of the duck
right now at pet smart for $17.00 for 2 lbs.

It's delicious and the dogs get to have some too. ;-)

http://www.amazon.com/Smokehouse-Nat...eats/dp/B0017T
X3VG

Or http://tinyurl.com/3hvhkpt

It really is nothing but pure dried meat.

The dogs love it so much they have come to expect it as treats and look
at me mournfully if I offer them any other kind. ;-) Even they know the
difference between quality and crap, altho' that surprises me a bit
knowing what dogs will sometimes consume. g

I wish they made a similar pure cat treat but this stuff is too tough
for the cats to chew.

I hate peppered jerky. When we home made it, we used teryaki sauce and
sometimes a bit of pure maple syrup and used a dehydrator. I've made
jerky from beef, venison and emu.
--
Peace, Om
Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

"Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
-- Mark Twain



  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 10:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 5,725
Default Alton Brown jerky

On 6/6/2011 10:31 PM, Storrmmee wrote:
the sanitation is what would bother me, and i think shink might have a jerky
for the cats, i know she gives hers some kind, Lee


An article I read a long time ago on making Jerky had some old coot's
recommendation that you apply lots of pepper to the meat so as to hide
the fly droppings. The alternative was to build a screened dryer which
is probably the way to go if you're not some kind of sun-crazed mountain
man. As always, it's probably best to ignore whatever goofy contraption
Alton Brown cooks up.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 11:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,154
Default Jerky recipes (was Alton Brown jerky)



I make jerky for hubby who loves it. I marinade beef in stuff like honey,
soy sauce, garlic, oil and herbs etc. I then dry it in my dehydrator.

Anyone care to share their favourite recipes?

--
--

https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 03:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 5,244
Default Jerky recipes (was Alton Brown jerky)

On Jun 7, 7:02*am, zxcvbob wrote:


so, what kind of dehydrator do you have....

I'm thinking of getting one.

Any of you with dehydrators have recommendations? I dont' need a big
expensive set up...just something that stores easily that I can do
small amounts of stuff at a time in.

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 06:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sky Sky is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,348
Default Jerky recipes (was Alton Brown jerky)

On 6/7/2011 5:53 AM, Ophelia wrote:


I make jerky for hubby who loves it. I marinade beef in stuff like
honey, soy sauce, garlic, oil and herbs etc. I then dry it in my
dehydrator.

Anyone care to share their favourite recipes?


Alas, I haven't made jerky in a long time. But, when I do, I get a
whole, inexpensive beef roast (I forget what sort of cut) and ask the
store butcher to cut it into very thin slices approximately 2- to 3-mm
thick (less than 1/8") - and I show them the bottom side of a (finger)
ring to demonstrate the thickness.

Then, the beef slices get marinated in a mixture of 1/2-n-1/2 water and
soy sauce with a wee bit of Liquid Smoke for about 24-hours or so in the
refrigerator. After marinating, the liquid gets drained & discarded,
and each slice gets thoroughly dried between paper towels, which tends
to use a whole roll.

To dry the jerky, each slice gets individually draped directly over two
rungs of the racks in the oven (I have extra oven racks just for this
purpose). By hanging the slices over two rungs, this prevents the
dangling portions of the raw beef from touching each other during the
desiccation process. The oven light is kept on to help increase the
ambient temperature in the oven. The oven also gets turned on briefly
for a couple of minutes every few hours or so (whenever) to help raise
the oven's temperature a little bit - this is optional. One word of
caution, when the oven is briefly turned on, DO NOT WALK AWAY vbg!!!!
I learned this the hard way and ended up 'cooking' the jerky instead,
which is not desirable! After a couple of days, the jerky is ready for
consumption

Sky

--

Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 08:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,416
Default Jerky recipes (was Alton Brown jerky)

ImStillMags wrote:

so, what kind of dehydrator do you have....


Garage sale used for five bucks. Extra trays, different garage sale,
also five bucks. Ten dollars and some clean up. That's the kind we had
for a while.

The current one is the christmas gift model. ;^) American Harvester I
think.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 08:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,416
Default Alton Brown jerky

Omelet wrote:

I think she was referring to the pet jerky I was talking about. g


Pet jerky. *Way* too easy to read *that* phrase the wrong way.

Speaking of reading the wrong way - I looked at the subject line and
thought "Okay. I prefer calling him funny but I'll go for phrasing it
that way. Matter of personal tastes I guess".
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 08:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,416
Default Alton Brown jerky

Omelet wrote:

Where do you think the weevils in your pantries come from? The eggs
are already in the food products.


At one point there was a company that bred predator insects to add to
silos of whole grain. The tiger bugs would patrol the grain looking for
grazing bugs and eat them. Net result a lot less insect parts. But
since it was actively adding insects to grain they couldn't get
commercial licensing when they tried to move from pilot project to
wholesale marketing.

I guess they were "them-goods" put in to eat the "we-evils". Nah, too
hard to pronounce.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-06-2011, 09:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,928
Default Jerky recipes (was Alton Brown jerky)

Doug Freyburger wrote:

ImStillMags wrote:

so, what kind of dehydrator do you have....


Garage sale used for five bucks. Extra trays, different garage sale,
also five bucks. Ten dollars and some clean up. That's the kind we had
for a while.


Popular brand. I've had the same set for a decade or so. They work.

Jim
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-06-2011, 09:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,620
Default Alton Brown jerky

i rarely eat ANY jerky not something i would be attracted to... milk bonez
always smelled to weird for me to get past my nose, Lee
"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"Storrmmee" wrote:

i know about rodent hairs, and worms in frozen fish, have a sanatation
liscense... it is the cleanleness of the workers i find might not be
scrutinized as much as humans, but then i often wonder about the
cleanleness
of workers on human food lins as well... and hey if it works for you,
thats
what matters, Lee


Pet jerky is tasty and low calorie and zero carb and (quite important to
me) sugar free and low sodium. It's not killed me yet and I like it. :-)

I've known people many years in the past that have eaten Milk Bone Dog
Biscuits.

If you find a pet treat that you like and fits your diet, well, I'd not
be afraid to eat it. :-) And it's frequently cheaper...

Dog jerky that is pure dried meat, to date to me, is better quality than
any of the overly chemically treated human jerky I have ever found!

YMMV of course...

And it's about 1/2 the price.

Do I recommend it? It's your choice! I do eat dog jerky and enjoy
every bite and my dogs love it too. I'm not ashamed to admit that I eat
it. g
--
Peace, Om
Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

"Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
-- Mark Twain





Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
alton brown Somebody 1.0 General Cooking 8 04-10-2012 09:27 AM
What's up with Alton Brown? Jack[_18_] General Cooking 12 30-09-2009 06:46 PM
Alton Brown knows balls Paul M. Cook General Cooking 2 06-11-2005 06:14 AM
Alton Brown Me General Cooking 55 04-07-2005 08:10 PM
Alton Brown is Elton Brown all growed up Blair P. Houghton General Cooking 4 18-03-2004 07:11 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:45 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017