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Old 27-01-2011, 06:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some recipes. -aem
http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,5285427.story

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Old 27-01-2011, 06:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some recipes. -aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...


Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem
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Old 27-01-2011, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

On 1/27/2011 1:42 PM, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some recipes. -aem
http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,5285427.story


sounds good! Thanks! need to make some soon.

--
Currently Reading: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold
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Old 27-01-2011, 08:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

"aem" schrieb :
On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some
s. -aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...


Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem



That's original focaccia ?
Not in the real world (ie., outside the USA).
High water to flour rate ? snort
Rest overnight in the refrigerator ? snort
The only focaccia which resembles the thing in the article would be
the "Focaccia al formaggio" from Liguria.(200 g flour, 100 ml EVOO,
salt and cold water).
"Focaccia sarda" (from Sardinia) has a potato dough.

Focaccia could be translated as pancake.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner



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Old 27-01-2011, 10:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:50:22 +0100, "Michael Kuettner"
wrote:

"aem" schrieb :
On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some
s. -aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...


Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem



That's original focaccia ?
Not in the real world (ie., outside the USA).
High water to flour rate ? snort
Rest overnight in the refrigerator ? snort
The only focaccia which resembles the thing in the article would be
the "Focaccia al formaggio" from Liguria.(200 g flour, 100 ml EVOO,
salt and cold water).
"Focaccia sarda" (from Sardinia) has a potato dough.

Focaccia could be translated as pancake.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


No need for you to snort, of course, as there are as many variations
of focaccia as there are little towns in Liguria that make their
version as do some other places in Italy.

In fact, you can even cross over into France and try some fougasse if
you want another variation.

The LAT article cited above mentions Carol Field's book. You'd do well
to read it.

Boron


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Old 27-01-2011, 11:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

On 1/27/2011 3:50 PM, Michael Kuettner wrote:
"aem" schrieb :
On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some s.
-aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...


Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem



That's original focaccia ?
Not in the real world (ie., outside the USA).
High water to flour rate ? snort
Rest overnight in the refrigerator ? snort
The only focaccia which resembles the thing in the article would be
the "Focaccia al formaggio" from Liguria.(200 g flour, 100 ml EVOO,
salt and cold water).
"Focaccia sarda" (from Sardinia) has a potato dough.

Focaccia could be translated as pancake.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner






--
Currently Reading: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold
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Old 28-01-2011, 07:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

"Boron Elgar" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:50:22 +0100, "Michael Kuettner"
wrote:

"aem" schrieb :
On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some

-aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...

Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem



That's original focaccia ?
Not in the real world (ie., outside the USA).
High water to flour rate ? snort
Rest overnight in the refrigerator ? snort
The only focaccia which resembles the thing in the article would be
the "Focaccia al formaggio" from Liguria.(200 g flour, 100 ml EVOO,
salt and cold water).
"Focaccia sarda" (from Sardinia) has a potato dough.

Focaccia could be translated as pancake.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


No need for you to snort, of course, as there are as many variations
of focaccia as there are little towns in Liguria that make their
version as do some other places in Italy.

Some other places ? Nearly all other places.

In fact, you can even cross over into France and try some fougasse if
you want another variation.

Exactly. The word of focaccia is a very big place.

The LAT article cited above mentions Carol Field's book. You'd do well
to read it.

Whatever for ? When I want to go to Italy I drive 2 hours.
It would have been better if the author had read the book.
That "back to the basics" makes as much sense as
"Pie - back to the basics". What's a basic pie ?

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


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Old 29-01-2011, 12:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 20:27:26 +0100, "Michael Kuettner"
wrote:

"Boron Elgar" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
.. .
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:50:22 +0100, "Michael Kuettner"
wrote:

"aem" schrieb :
On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some

-aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...

Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem


That's original focaccia ?
Not in the real world (ie., outside the USA).
High water to flour rate ? snort
Rest overnight in the refrigerator ? snort
The only focaccia which resembles the thing in the article would be
the "Focaccia al formaggio" from Liguria.(200 g flour, 100 ml EVOO,
salt and cold water).
"Focaccia sarda" (from Sardinia) has a potato dough.

Focaccia could be translated as pancake.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


No need for you to snort, of course, as there are as many variations
of focaccia as there are little towns in Liguria that make their
version as do some other places in Italy.

Some other places ? Nearly all other places.


Some don't...it is damn common, but not universal, at least insofar as
my own travels.

In fact, you can even cross over into France and try some fougasse if
you want another variation.

Exactly. The word of focaccia is a very big place.

The LAT article cited above mentions Carol Field's book. You'd do well
to read it.

Whatever for ? When I want to go to Italy I drive 2 hours.
It would have been better if the author had read the book.
That "back to the basics" makes as much sense as
"Pie - back to the basics". What's a basic pie ?


Because it is an excellent bread book - very well written.. I have
lots of foods available nearby my home, but that doesn't mean I won't
read about them or seek out recipes.

Boron
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Old 29-01-2011, 06:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics


"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 20:27:26 +0100, "Michael Kuettner"
wrote:

"Boron Elgar" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
. ..
On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 21:50:22 +0100, "Michael Kuettner"
wrote:

"aem" schrieb :
On Jan 27, 10:42 am, aem wrote:
The estimable Russ Parsons has an article in the L.A. Times that
seeks
to return to the basics of simple and delicious focaccio. Popularity
leads to many variations, some of which stray too far. So he gives a
reminder of the original that deserves the popularity in the first
place. Links to some

-aemhttp://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook-focaccia-20110127,...

Yeah, I know I misspelled it. -aem


That's original focaccia ?
Not in the real world (ie., outside the USA).
High water to flour rate ? snort
Rest overnight in the refrigerator ? snort
The only focaccia which resembles the thing in the article would be
the "Focaccia al formaggio" from Liguria.(200 g flour, 100 ml EVOO,
salt and cold water).
"Focaccia sarda" (from Sardinia) has a potato dough.

Focaccia could be translated as pancake.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


No need for you to snort, of course, as there are as many variations
of focaccia as there are little towns in Liguria that make their
version as do some other places in Italy.

Some other places ? Nearly all other places.


Some don't...it is damn common, but not universal, at least insofar as
my own travels.

In fact, you can even cross over into France and try some fougasse if
you want another variation.

Exactly. The word of focaccia is a very big place.

The LAT article cited above mentions Carol Field's book. You'd do well
to read it.

Whatever for ? When I want to go to Italy I drive 2 hours.
It would have been better if the author had read the book.
That "back to the basics" makes as much sense as
"Pie - back to the basics". What's a basic pie ?


Because it is an excellent bread book - very well written.. I have
lots of foods available nearby my home, but that doesn't mean I won't
read about them or seek out recipes.

Boron


I think also, that Carol Field's books on breadmaking are excellent. I have
a recipe for foccacia continuously in my head. Even though, I frequently
pick up her book to see exactly what to do. Foccacia is similar, I think, to
ciabatta. It's a high moisture dough you knead and rise less rather than
more.

Kent





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Old 29-01-2011, 12:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Focaccio--back to basics

On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 22:07:15 -0800, "Kent" wrote:


"Boron Elgar" wrote in message



The LAT article cited above mentions Carol Field's book. You'd do well
to read it.



Because it is an excellent bread book - very well written.. I have
lots of foods available nearby my home, but that doesn't mean I won't
read about them or seek out recipes.

Boron


I think also, that Carol Field's books on breadmaking are excellent. I have
a recipe for foccacia continuously in my head. Even though, I frequently
pick up her book to see exactly what to do. Foccacia is similar, I think, to
ciabatta. It's a high moisture dough you knead and rise less rather than
more.

Kent


Have you tried her cocodrillo? A most excellent bread, although it
requires a decent mixer to pull off.

Boron


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