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Old 14-01-2011, 02:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"



http://www.aolnews.com/2011/01/12/br...-butter-choco/
("Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade")

More about marmalade:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9a37551e-1...#axzz1Ay5tc5RE

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...n/12/marmalade
("Marmalade's appeal must endure")


Lenona.

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Old 14-01-2011, 03:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

Lenona wrote on Thu, 13 Jan 2011 17:19:10 -0800 (PST):

More about marmalade:


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9a37551e-1...#axzz1Ay5tc5RE


http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...n/12/marmalade
("Marmalade's appeal must endure")


In the US, is it possible to buy marmalade made with bitter oranges and
lots of peel at a reasonable price, say about $4 a pound? There are some
imports that are good but the prices are cruel. At one time, Keillers
was a possibility but nowadays, it seems to be mainly made with pectin.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 14-01-2011, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children ShunMarmalade"

James Silverton wrote:
Lenona wrote on Thu, 13 Jan 2011 17:19:10 -0800 (PST):

More about marmalade:


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9a37551e-1...#axzz1Ay5tc5RE


http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...n/12/marmalade
("Marmalade's appeal must endure")


In the US, is it possible to buy marmalade made with bitter oranges and
lots of peel at a reasonable price, say about $4 a pound? There are some
imports that are good but the prices are cruel. At one time, Keillers
was a possibility but nowadays, it seems to be mainly made with pectin.

Ahhhh. The last time I was at British Delights in Westford, Mass.
they did have what you seek. (Is that called thick cut or
something like that?) However, having recently decided that sweet
marmalade is too lacking in character and the other is too bitter,
I was looking for the latter so I could mix the two. I had a hard
time finding any of the marmalades with lots of peel. Soon, I'll
go back to the British store to see whether they still have it.
Their prices can be pretty high. I don't recall the prices for
marmalades and such.

--
Jean B.
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Old 14-01-2011, 06:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 09:47:16 -0500, "James Silverton"
wrote:

Lenona wrote on Thu, 13 Jan 2011 17:19:10 -0800 (PST):

More about marmalade:


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/9a37551e-1...#axzz1Ay5tc5RE


http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...n/12/marmalade
("Marmalade's appeal must endure")


In the US, is it possible to buy marmalade made with bitter oranges and
lots of peel at a reasonable price, say about $4 a pound? There are some
imports that are good but the prices are cruel. At one time, Keillers
was a possibility but nowadays, it seems to be mainly made with pectin.



I don't know-- but all this talk of marmalade makes me want spring to
hurry up. My first pound of rhubarb each spring goes to marmalade.

6 cups chopped rhubarb
6 cups sugar
2 medium oranges

Combine rhubarb and sugar in a large heavy saucepan. Grind oranges,
including the peels, in a food processor; add to rhubarb mixture.
Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, stirring often
until marmalade sheets from a spoon, about 1 hour.

I don't think I've ever seen bitter oranges when I need them. I
pick barely ripe oranges that look good at the grocery. It has been
a never-fail recipe for me.

Jim
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Old 14-01-2011, 06:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 10:47:10 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

Soon, I'll
go back to the British store to see whether they still have it.
Their prices can be pretty high. I don't recall the prices for
marmalades and such.


I don't buy regular marmalade because it's too sweet. Blech.
Too bad we have to search out a British store just to buy something
decent.

--

Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.


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Old 14-01-2011, 06:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children ShunMarmalade"

sf wrote:
On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 10:47:10 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

Soon, I'll
go back to the British store to see whether they still have it.
Their prices can be pretty high. I don't recall the prices for
marmalades and such.


I don't buy regular marmalade because it's too sweet. Blech.
Too bad we have to search out a British store just to buy something
decent.

I don't like really bitter things, which is why I decided to try
combining two different kinds. (I always combine mustards now,
and I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.

--
Jean B.
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Old 14-01-2011, 08:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Jan 14, 12:47*pm, sf wrote:


I don't buy regular marmalade because it's too sweet. *Blech.
Too bad we have to search out a British store just to buy something
decent.



What's so hard about MAKING your own, not-so-sweet marmalade?

I made my own, easily, years ago. The recipe was from Linda Allison's
early 1970s science book: "The Reasons for Seasons."

I gave it as a Christmas present, with a card with selected rhymes
from the first half of A.A. Milne's "The King's Breakfast."

For those who don't remember that poem:

www.poetryconnection.net/poets/A.A._Milne/14281


Lenona.



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Old 14-01-2011, 08:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:58:58 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.


I don't think I've seen that one. Is Justin's a grocery store or
specialty store item?

--

Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.
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Old 14-01-2011, 08:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 11:00:08 -0800 (PST), Lenona
wrote:

What's so hard about MAKING your own, not-so-sweet marmalade?


I used to... it was pineapple orange marmalade with Grand Marnier, but
I am not fond of canning. I don't even make freezer jam.

--

Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.
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Old 14-01-2011, 08:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 09:47:08 -0800, sf wrote:

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 10:47:10 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

Soon, I'll
go back to the British store to see whether they still have it.
Their prices can be pretty high. I don't recall the prices for
marmalades and such.


I don't buy regular marmalade because it's too sweet. Blech.
Too bad we have to search out a British store just to buy something
decent.


Typically Brit marmalade contains significantly more sugar (it's much
more dense/crystalene than flowing US marmalade) but the very tart
Seville oranges mask the sweetness. I don't particularly like Brit
marmalade, it's more a poor quality confection than a spread... I find
its texture icky, like cheap jelly beans. I don't consider their
Seville oranges a plus, they're sour but taste nothing of oranges.


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Old 14-01-2011, 09:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"


"sf" wrote in message ...
| On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:58:58 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:
|
| I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
| Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.
|
| I don't think I've seen that one. Is Justin's a grocery store or
| specialty store item?

Justin's is a totally delicious line of nut butters:
http://tinyurl.com/5v8om6x

My favorite is the maple almond butter, in convenient
portion-control sizes.

pavane





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Old 15-01-2011, 01:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children ShunMarmalade"

sf wrote:
On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:58:58 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.


I don't think I've seen that one. Is Justin's a grocery store or
specialty store item?

It is at Whole Foods (here, anyway). It is ultra-expensive. I
got some at half price, which is still expensive enough. It's
kind-of a grown-up Nutella.

--
Jean B.
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Old 15-01-2011, 01:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children ShunMarmalade"

pavane wrote:
"sf" wrote in message ...
| On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:58:58 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:
|
| I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
| Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.
|
| I don't think I've seen that one. Is Justin's a grocery store or
| specialty store item?

Justin's is a totally delicious line of nut butters:
http://tinyurl.com/5v8om6x

My favorite is the maple almond butter, in convenient
portion-control sizes.

pavane

DON'T TELL ME THIS!!!! Yes, I find myself debating about getting
the little packets, but that would be even more expensive per
amount. OTOH, one can afford a packet--and the larger container
is not there demanding to be eaten.

--
Jean B.
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Old 15-01-2011, 02:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children Shun Marmalade"

On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 19:53:22 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

sf wrote:
On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:58:58 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.


I don't think I've seen that one. Is Justin's a grocery store or
specialty store item?

It is at Whole Foods (here, anyway). It is ultra-expensive. I
got some at half price, which is still expensive enough. It's
kind-of a grown-up Nutella.


Thanks, Jean! I don't go to whole foods very often so I'll keep it in
mind for the next time I'm there.

--

Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.
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Old 15-01-2011, 03:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Article: "Bad News for Paddington Bear: British Children ShunMarmalade"

sf wrote:
On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 19:53:22 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

sf wrote:
On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:58:58 -0500, "Jean B." wrote:

I just started combining Nutella with the ever-so pricy
Justin's version, which has a lot more flavor and some texture.
I don't think I've seen that one. Is Justin's a grocery store or
specialty store item?

It is at Whole Foods (here, anyway). It is ultra-expensive. I
got some at half price, which is still expensive enough. It's
kind-of a grown-up Nutella.


Thanks, Jean! I don't go to whole foods very often so I'll keep it in
mind for the next time I'm there.

Save your pennies!

--
Jean B.


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