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Old 03-12-2010, 10:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs.
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. No salt or
any added fats.

Result: The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells.
Otherwise they tasted identical. I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw

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Old 03-12-2010, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

On Dec 3, 2:45*pm, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs. *
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. *No salt or
any added fats.

Result: *The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells. *
Otherwise they tasted identical. *I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw


Even the organic 'free range' eggs are mass produced.

If you want really good tasting eggs, you need your own backyard
chickens. IMHO


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Old 03-12-2010, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

On Dec 3, 2:45*pm, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs. *
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. *No salt or
any added fats.

Result: *The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells. *
Otherwise they tasted identical. *I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw


The mass produced eggs contain thing that the free range don't. things
like hormones and antibiotics. I eat the free range. $3.50 for a dozen
eggs is still a good deal in my book.
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Old 04-12-2010, 01:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 15:01:02 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags wrote:

On Dec 3, 2:45*pm, Sqwertz wrote:


Result: *The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells. *
Otherwise they tasted identical. *I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.


Even the organic 'free range' eggs are mass produced.

If you want really good tasting eggs, you need your own backyard
chickens. IMHO


I don't think there's any more room left back there with all the
cows, pigs, and donkeys.

-sw
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Old 04-12-2010, 01:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs


Sqwertz wrote:

I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs.
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. No salt or
any added fats.

Result: The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells.
Otherwise they tasted identical. I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw


It depends what you're using the eggs for, the organic cage free eggs,
at least the Eggland's Best ones have notably larger, yellower and
creamier yolks, something that is important for custard stuff like creme
brulee, ice cream base, etc.


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Old 04-12-2010, 01:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

Sqwertz wrote:
On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 15:01:02 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags wrote:

On Dec 3, 2:45 pm, Sqwertz wrote:


Result: The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells.
Otherwise they tasted identical. I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.


Even the organic 'free range' eggs are mass produced.

If you want really good tasting eggs, you need your own backyard
chickens. IMHO


I don't think there's any more room left back there with all the
cows, pigs, and donkeys.

-sw


My free ranging chickens in my back yard are much better than store
bought. Not only do they have a thicker shell, the yolks have a rich
orange color, not yellow. My eggs have a richer taste, the yolks stand
up and do not beak easy when frying. The big difference between mine and
the so called free ranging chickens in stores is my chickens main diet
is not all grain, its bugs... They also have my leftovers, chickens love
lettuce, corn on the cob, tomatoes...

--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs


"Chemo the Clown" wrote

The mass produced eggs contain thing that the free range don't. things
like hormones and antibiotics. I eat the free range. $3.50 for a dozen
eggs is still a good deal in my book.



That makes some sense for eating them for breakfast, but my wife bought 15
dozen yesterday for holiday baking. That is a $30 difference where that
taste won't matter so we'll let a little antibiotic slip by.

For eating, we have a couple of local home raised sellers that sell them.
Fresh and tasty.

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Old 04-12-2010, 06:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

"Chemo the Clown" wrote

The mass produced eggs contain thing that the free range don't. things
like hormones and antibiotics. I eat the free range. $3.50 for a dozen
eggs is still a good deal in my book.


Hormones are not allowed to be given to chickens. At least here in
the U.S. I don't know how they do it in your homeland.

And traces of antibiotics in eggs are actually pretty rare an are
not contributing to antibiotic resistance in humans in the
quantities that they do appear.

Got any other mis-information for us?

-sw
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Old 04-12-2010, 06:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

"Chemo the Clown" wrote in message
...

On Dec 3, 2:45 pm, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs.
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. No salt or
any added fats.

Result: The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells.
Otherwise they tasted identical. I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw


The mass produced eggs contain thing that the free range don't. things
like hormones and antibiotics. I eat the free range. $3.50 for a dozen
eggs is still a good deal in my book.


Here in Australia, it is illegal to use hormones or antibiotics in chicken
or egg production!

-- Bigbazza (Barry) Oz






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Old 04-12-2010, 01:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs


" Bigbazza" wrote in message
...
"Chemo the Clown" wrote in message
...

On Dec 3, 2:45 pm, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs.
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. No salt or
any added fats.

Result: The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells.
Otherwise they tasted identical. I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw


The mass produced eggs contain thing that the free range don't. things
like hormones and antibiotics. I eat the free range. $3.50 for a dozen
eggs is still a good deal in my book.


Here in Australia, it is illegal to use hormones or antibiotics in chicken
or egg production!

-- Bigbazza (Barry) Oz


I don't see the difference in taste or quality. I'm not willing to pay
$3.50 for a dozen eggs. (I also can't have chickens running around in my
back yard.) I don't eat eggs often enough to worry about whatever it is you
think they contain. I'm watching my wallet, not what someone might be doing
to eggs. I've been eating regular store bought eggs for 40-something years
without a problem. Don't need to spend extra on "organic". IMHO, the whole
"organic" thing is a marketing ploy to get people to line someone's pocket.

Jill



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Old 04-12-2010, 02:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

"jmcquown" wrote:
" Bigbazza" wrote in message
...
"Chemo the Clown" wrote in message
...

On Dec 3, 2:45 pm, Sqwertz wrote:
I bought a dozen organic, free range brown eggs and did two
comparisons against my regular market, mass-produced white eggs.
One set of eggs was over medium, the other scrambled. No salt or
any added fats.

Result: The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells.
Otherwise they tasted identical. I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.

-sw


The mass produced eggs contain thing that the free range don't.
things
like hormones and antibiotics. I eat the free range. $3.50 for a
dozen
eggs is still a good deal in my book.


Here in Australia, it is illegal to use hormones or antibiotics in
chicken or egg production!

-- Bigbazza (Barry) Oz


I don't see the difference in taste or quality. I'm not willing to
pay $3.50 for a dozen eggs. (I also can't have chickens running
around in my back yard.) I don't eat eggs often enough to worry about
whatever it is you think they contain. I'm watching my wallet, not
what someone might be doing to eggs. I've been eating regular store
bought eggs for 40-something years without a problem. Don't need to
spend extra on "organic". IMHO, the whole "organic" thing is a
marketing ploy to get people to line someone's pocket.

Jill


Since you state you have a back yard, you can have chickens. Most
communities and cities now allow chickens in the back yard. You just
can't have roosters, they are noisy and mean. Roosters can scratch the
crap out of you. Hens do not stray far from the roost, are peaceful and
quiet all they way to the kitchen table as well as their eggs. Just
modify a garden shed, four hens would do nicely for a small family.
Chickens need less care than a cat. If you have a dog, train the dog not
to bother them, it won't take long. I have seen hawks try and always
fail to get a chicken. They will trust the hand that feeds them

--
Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)
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Old 04-12-2010, 03:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs


"Omelet" wrote

I bought some egglands best because they were supposed to be higher in
Omega 3's. Fish oil and I don't get along well.

The yolks tasted like fish to me. ;-p
But, I may just be sensitive to that flavor.


I wonder what they feed the hens. They may be getting fish oil, thus the
higher levels in the eggs.

I take a fish oil jel capsule every day with breakfast and never had any
taste from it, but I'm sure it would be nasty if it repeated on me.


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Old 04-12-2010, 05:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

On Sat, 4 Dec 2010 14:59:22 +0000 (UTC), Dan L wrote:

Since you state you have a back yard, you can have chickens. Most
communities and cities now allow chickens in the back yard.


What a Jill statement.

Do you have a list of those cities?

Just because *your* city allows chickens, don't assume that all
cities allow chickens. Many large cities and small communities do
not allow either.

Regardless, how many of us would raise chickens if they were legal?
Excluding Om. I certainly don't want to be known as the chicken
guy. And certainly not the ostrich guy either.

-sw
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Old 04-12-2010, 05:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 19:07:41 -0600, Sqwertz wrote:

On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 15:01:02 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags wrote:

On Dec 3, 2:45*pm, Sqwertz wrote:


Result: *The organic free range brown eggs had harder shells. *
Otherwise they tasted identical. *I'll stick do the mass produced,
white eggs that only cost $1.36/dz rather than $3.49.


Even the organic 'free range' eggs are mass produced.

If you want really good tasting eggs, you need your own backyard
chickens. IMHO


I don't think there's any more room left back there with all the
cows, pigs, and donkeys.

-sw


no goats?

your pal,
blake
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Old 04-12-2010, 05:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mass produced vs. Organic Free Range Eggs

Dan L wrote:
-snip-

Since you state you have a back yard, you can have chickens. Most
communities and cities now allow chickens in the back yard.


Most? Not in this neck of the woods. I have seen articles on all
3 nearby cities fighting 'farm animals in residential' areas. This
week there was one for the 'burb where I live.

One of the cities has a large Guyananese population which gave rise to
a live poultry store in the city. You walk in, pick your chicken,
and it is dispatched for you. But no live chickens are allowed at
residences unless you get a farm permit. [which you can't get within
the city]

Jim


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