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Old 22-10-2010, 04:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

I picked up a once or twice used Brinkman vertical smoker yesterday for $5
at a yard sale. They sell for around $75. All the trays and shelves, and a
pristine instructions manual.

I have another Brinkman round smoker that I like to smoke turkeys in, but it
is a little hard to use with all the stuff stacked the way it is when you
want to add water or briquettes. This one seems easier, and would be better
for smoking fish and jerky and smaller items.

Anyone use a smoker here? It IS a smoker, but it can be used to cook
anything cookable, using a slow cook temperature of 180-195 F. range.

Am going to do a turkey in the round one this Thanksgiving, as they always
come out so moist and juicy.

Steve

Heart surgery pending?
Read up and prepare.
Learn how to care for a friend.
http://cabgbypasssurgery.com



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Old 22-10-2010, 08:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker



"Steve B" wrote in message
...
I picked up a once or twice used Brinkman vertical smoker yesterday for $5
at a yard sale. They sell for around $75. All the trays and shelves, and
a pristine instructions manual.

I have another Brinkman round smoker that I like to smoke turkeys in, but
it is a little hard to use with all the stuff stacked the way it is when
you want to add water or briquettes. This one seems easier, and would be
better for smoking fish and jerky and smaller items.

Anyone use a smoker here? It IS a smoker, but it can be used to cook
anything cookable, using a slow cook temperature of 180-195 F. range.

Am going to do a turkey in the round one this Thanksgiving, as they always
come out so moist and juicy.

Steve

Heart surgery pending?
Read up and prepare.
Learn how to care for a friend.
http://cabgbypasssurgery.com



I have two. One for meats and one for peppers etc.
Its easy to get them too hot if you are not careful. I throw on wood chunks
that I soaked in water overnight. Sometimes the chunks dry out and burst
into flames.
Tom

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Old 22-10-2010, 10:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On 10/22/2010 10:26 AM, Steve B wrote:
I picked up a once or twice used Brinkman vertical smoker yesterday for $5
at a yard sale. They sell for around $75. All the trays and shelves, and a
pristine instructions manual.

I have another Brinkman round smoker that I like to smoke turkeys in, but it
is a little hard to use with all the stuff stacked the way it is when you
want to add water or briquettes. This one seems easier, and would be better
for smoking fish and jerky and smaller items.

Anyone use a smoker here? It IS a smoker, but it can be used to cook
anything cookable, using a slow cook temperature of 180-195 F. range.

Am going to do a turkey in the round one this Thanksgiving, as they always
come out so moist and juicy.

Steve



I have a Brinkman bullet-shaped smoker. The best advice was on
alt.food.barbecue. There is an FAQ he

http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/toc.html

I use lump charcoal in mine. I don't use water, but put some sand in the
bowl covered with foil. I don' tsoak lumps of wood in water, but wrap
them in aluminum foil and poke 2 or 3 small holes in the foil which is,
they have told me, the best way to create smoke. I use hickory chunks.


--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 22-10-2010, 11:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker


"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
b.com...
On 10/22/2010 10:26 AM, Steve B wrote:
I picked up a once or twice used Brinkman vertical smoker yesterday for
$5
at a yard sale. They sell for around $75. All the trays and shelves,
and a
pristine instructions manual.

I have another Brinkman round smoker that I like to smoke turkeys in, but
it
is a little hard to use with all the stuff stacked the way it is when you
want to add water or briquettes. This one seems easier, and would be
better
for smoking fish and jerky and smaller items.

Anyone use a smoker here? It IS a smoker, but it can be used to cook
anything cookable, using a slow cook temperature of 180-195 F. range.

Am going to do a turkey in the round one this Thanksgiving, as they
always
come out so moist and juicy.

Steve



I have a Brinkman bullet-shaped smoker. The best advice was on
alt.food.barbecue. There is an FAQ he

http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/toc.html

I use lump charcoal in mine. I don't use water, but put some sand in the
bowl covered with foil. I don' tsoak lumps of wood in water, but wrap
them in aluminum foil and poke 2 or 3 small holes in the foil which is,
they have told me, the best way to create smoke. I use hickory chunks.


--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.


The advice about the foil with holes is in the instructions. On reading
reviews of this cooker, most comment that they had to drill holes in the
charcoal pan or make a hanging screen because it doesn't get "hot enough",
but to my recollection, the cooking takes place from 180-195 F, and these
sports wanted it up around the 220F. range. I'll check it out, and have
another pan from my Brinkman bullet shaped smoker, so if I drill it, I will
still have an original backup. With my bullet style stand up, I liked the
ability to just check the chart for weight of the meat, add as much charcoal
and water as the chart said for that amount of meat, and walk away. I think
this one may require a little more tending, but the instructions also warn
against opening the door, even once, as heat is lost, and it takes time to
recover.

Steve

Heart surgery pending?
Read up and prepare.
Learn how to care for a friend.
http://cabgbypasssurgery.com


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Old 23-10-2010, 12:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 15:28:05 -0400, Tom Biasi wrote:

I have two. One for meats and one for peppers etc.
Its easy to get them too hot if you are not careful. I throw on wood chunks
that I soaked in water overnight. Sometimes the chunks dry out and burst
into flames.


Wrap them tightly in heavy duty foil and poke a small hole (1/4cm)
in the foil. That's the common way to use wood chunks in these
smokers.

-sw


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Old 23-10-2010, 04:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,516
Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On 10/22/2010 5:17 PM, Steve B wrote:

The advice about the foil with holes is in the instructions. On reading
reviews of this cooker, most comment that they had to drill holes in the
charcoal pan or make a hanging screen because it doesn't get "hot enough",
but to my recollection, the cooking takes place from 180-195 F, and these
sports wanted it up around the 220F. range. I'll check it out, and have
another pan from my Brinkman bullet shaped smoker, so if I drill it, I will
still have an original backup. With my bullet style stand up, I liked the
ability to just check the chart for weight of the meat, add as much charcoal
and water as the chart said for that amount of meat, and walk away. I think
this one may require a little more tending, but the instructions also warn
against opening the door, even once, as heat is lost, and it takes time to
recover.


Steve,

There are two kinds of inexpensive Brinkmans. One is the Gourmet, which
is what I have. That one does not require drilling since it has legs.
The regular, little bit cheaper, Brinkman is the one that they say needs
to be drilled.

Before you drill anything, figure out which one you have.

BTW, Mine doesn't get too hot since I quit using water and started using
sand.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 23-10-2010, 05:01 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 35
Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 22:28:16 -0500, Janet Wilder wrote:

There are two kinds of inexpensive Brinkmans. One is the Gourmet, which
is what I have. That one does not require drilling since it has legs.
The regular, little bit cheaper, Brinkman is the one that they say needs
to be drilled.

Before you drill anything, figure out which one you have.


The Smoke 'n Pit ad the Cajun Cooker need holes drilled because
they have an enclosed fire-pan (basically it's just a bowl). The
Brinkman Gourmet has a firepan with integrated air louvers. All
the models have legs, the Gourmet actually has the piddliest legs
of them all. But they do raise it off the ground an inch to let
air in underneath.

The way he said "easier to add charcoal" and mentioned the door and
"shelves" (not racks) makes me think he has a newer box-style
smoker. It's square, not round.

And IIRC, this one has reverted back to the bowl-type firepan with
no holes in it. So it would need holes or at least a small round
rack in the bottom to allow air in and ash to fall through. It's a
stupid design and I don't know why they went back to it.

http://www.foodsmokingreview.com/page05.htm

-sw
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Old 23-10-2010, 06:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On Oct 22, 2:36*pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
On 10/22/2010 10:26 AM, Steve B wrote:



I picked up a once or twice used Brinkman vertical smoker yesterday for $5
at a yard sale. *They sell for around $75. *All the trays and shelves, and a
pristine instructions manual.


I have another Brinkman round smoker that I like to smoke turkeys in, but it
is a little hard to use with all the stuff stacked the way it is when you
want to add water or briquettes. *This one seems easier, and would be better
for smoking fish and jerky and smaller items.


Anyone use a smoker here? *It IS a smoker, but it can be used to cook
anything cookable, using a slow cook temperature of 180-195 F. range.


Am going to do a turkey in the round one this Thanksgiving, as they always
come out so moist and juicy.


Steve


I have a Brinkman bullet-shaped smoker. The best advice was on
alt.food.barbecue. *There is an FAQ *he

http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/toc.html

I use lump charcoal in mine. I don't use water, but put some sand in the
bowl covered with foil. *I don' tsoak lumps of wood in water, but wrap
them in aluminum foil and poke 2 or 3 small holes in the foil which is,
they have told me, the best way to create smoke. I use hickory chunks.


Is that faq up to date? There's a quote from Phil Wight,, and old
Phil's been gone a while now.
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Old 23-10-2010, 06:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 15:17:43 -0700 in rec.food.cooking, "Steve B"
wrote,
The advice about the foil with holes is in the instructions. On reading
reviews of this cooker, most comment that they had to drill holes in the
charcoal pan or make a hanging screen because it doesn't get "hot enough",
but to my recollection, the cooking takes place from 180-195 F,


That sounds like the temperature in the interior of the piece of meat,
not the higher temp in the smoker needed to transfer heat to the meat.
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Old 23-10-2010, 01:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker



"squirtz" wrote in message ...

On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 15:28:05 -0400, Tom Biasi wrote:

I have two. One for meats and one for peppers etc.
Its easy to get them too hot if you are not careful. I throw on wood
chunks
that I soaked in water overnight. Sometimes the chunks dry out and burst
into flames.


Wrap them tightly in heavy duty foil and poke a small hole (1/4cm)
in the foil. That's the common way to use wood chunks in these
smokers.

-sw

Yes, I do that sometimes. I don't often mind if they burn a little but just
wanted to explain how it can get too hot if you are not watching.



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Old 23-10-2010, 04:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On 10/23/2010 12:19 AM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
On Oct 22, 2:36 pm, Janet wrote:
On 10/22/2010 10:26 AM, Steve B wrote:



I picked up a once or twice used Brinkman vertical smoker yesterday for $5
at a yard sale. They sell for around $75. All the trays and shelves, and a
pristine instructions manual.


I have another Brinkman round smoker that I like to smoke turkeys in, but it
is a little hard to use with all the stuff stacked the way it is when you
want to add water or briquettes. This one seems easier, and would be better
for smoking fish and jerky and smaller items.


Anyone use a smoker here? It IS a smoker, but it can be used to cook
anything cookable, using a slow cook temperature of 180-195 F. range.


Am going to do a turkey in the round one this Thanksgiving, as they always
come out so moist and juicy.


Steve


I have a Brinkman bullet-shaped smoker. The best advice was on
alt.food.barbecue. There is an FAQ he

http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/toc.html

I use lump charcoal in mine. I don't use water, but put some sand in the
bowl covered with foil. I don' tsoak lumps of wood in water, but wrap
them in aluminum foil and poke 2 or 3 small holes in the foil which is,
they have told me, the best way to create smoke. I use hickory chunks.


Is that faq up to date? There's a quote from Phil Wight,, and old
Phil's been gone a while now.


I don't know how up to date it is, but the advice is still excellent.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 23-10-2010, 04:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On 10/23/2010 7:37 AM, Tom Biasi wrote:


"squirtz" wrote in message ...

On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 15:28:05 -0400, Tom Biasi wrote:

I have two. One for meats and one for peppers etc.
Its easy to get them too hot if you are not careful. I throw on wood
chunks
that I soaked in water overnight. Sometimes the chunks dry out and burst
into flames.


Wrap them tightly in heavy duty foil and poke a small hole (1/4cm)
in the foil. That's the common way to use wood chunks in these
smokers.

-sw

Yes, I do that sometimes. I don't often mind if they burn a little but
just wanted to explain how it can get too hot if you are not watching.


I bought a battery operated remote thermometer. I put a cork on the end
of the probe and lay it on the rack next to the meat. That gives me the
best indication of the temperature in the smoker.

After several hours, when I think we are getting close to done (1 or so
hours) I take off the cork and put the probe into the meat.

When the meat has reached the desired temp (for me 10 less than
"done"), I will wrap it several times in heavy-duty foil, a couple of
big towels and a blanket and put it all in a cooler or styrofoam chest
for a couple of hours more.

Everyone develops their own set of techniques over time, but it helps to
get hints and information from others when you are first starting out.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 23-10-2010, 04:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 607
Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker


"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
b.com...
On 10/22/2010 5:17 PM, Steve B wrote:

The advice about the foil with holes is in the instructions. On reading
reviews of this cooker, most comment that they had to drill holes in the
charcoal pan or make a hanging screen because it doesn't get "hot
enough",
but to my recollection, the cooking takes place from 180-195 F, and these
sports wanted it up around the 220F. range. I'll check it out, and have
another pan from my Brinkman bullet shaped smoker, so if I drill it, I
will
still have an original backup. With my bullet style stand up, I liked
the
ability to just check the chart for weight of the meat, add as much
charcoal
and water as the chart said for that amount of meat, and walk away. I
think
this one may require a little more tending, but the instructions also
warn
against opening the door, even once, as heat is lost, and it takes time
to
recover.


Steve,

There are two kinds of inexpensive Brinkmans. One is the Gourmet, which is
what I have. That one does not require drilling since it has legs. The
regular, little bit cheaper, Brinkman is the one that they say needs to be
drilled.

Before you drill anything, figure out which one you have.

BTW, Mine doesn't get too hot since I quit using water and started using
sand.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.


Mine is the "Brinkman Charcoal Smoker Heavy-Duty Charcoal/Wood
Smoker/Grill). No Gourmet anywhere on it. It does have legs, but they are
flimsy, and one was broken, hence the reason I got it so cheap. The door is
on pins, too, instead of hinges, and the door came off in my hand when I
went to open it. Another simple fix for two small metal hinges, and one of
the reasons I got it so cheap. But I can weld on lots stronger legs that
will stick out farther, making it less topheavy, with wheels on it. The
picture here shows it with wheels, but none came with it. I believe mine is
the regular one. In reading a site on the Internet,

http://bbq.about.com/b/2004/04/22/br...ter-smoker.htm

a couple of the posters mention that they use sand. Is that used dry or
wet? If dry, what does it do? And if dry, do you just use more liquids
inside the meats rolled up in foil or ?

Steve

Heart surgery pending?
Read up and prepare.
Learn how to care for a friend.
http://cabgbypasssurgery.com




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Old 23-10-2010, 06:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 202
Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker



"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
eb.com...

On 10/23/2010 7:37 AM, Tom Biasi wrote:


"squirtz" wrote in message ...

On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 15:28:05 -0400, Tom Biasi wrote:

I have two. One for meats and one for peppers etc.
Its easy to get them too hot if you are not careful. I throw on wood
chunks
that I soaked in water overnight. Sometimes the chunks dry out and burst
into flames.


Wrap them tightly in heavy duty foil and poke a small hole (1/4cm)
in the foil. That's the common way to use wood chunks in these
smokers.

-sw

Yes, I do that sometimes. I don't often mind if they burn a little but
just wanted to explain how it can get too hot if you are not watching.


I bought a battery operated remote thermometer. I put a cork on the end
of the probe and lay it on the rack next to the meat. That gives me the
best indication of the temperature in the smoker.

After several hours, when I think we are getting close to done (1 or so
hours) I take off the cork and put the probe into the meat.

When the meat has reached the desired temp (for me 10 less than
"done"), I will wrap it several times in heavy-duty foil, a couple of
big towels and a blanket and put it all in a cooler or styrofoam chest
for a couple of hours more.

Everyone develops their own set of techniques over time, but it helps to
get hints and information from others when you are first starting out.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

What brand of remote thermometer do you have? I haven't found any that hold
up.

Tom

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Old 23-10-2010, 06:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Brinkman Vertical Smoker

On Sat, 23 Oct 2010 08:37:44 -0400, Tom Biasi wrote:

Yes, I do that sometimes. I don't often mind if they burn a little but just
wanted to explain how it can get too hot if you are not watching.


If those wood chunks catch fire, your temps will spike
tremendously. I have no trouble maintaining a constant temp in my
Brinkman Gourmet bullet smoker, but with their cheaper bullet
smokers it can be difficult.

-sw


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