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Old 09-06-2010, 01:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

No where else to ask this, plus you're all a smart bunch.

Today I got my new laptop at work and the help desk brought it in and said
they had to send it back because it was making a high-pitched sound that was
annoying. I couldn't hear it. I asked a couple of others to come listen to
my laptop and tell me what they heard, and without knowing I couldn't hear
it and without knowing the help desk was going to send it back, everyone
said high-pitched sound, maybe hard drive or maybe video. More intrigued at
why I couldn't hear this, I asked others, and some even said it was giving
them a headache to hear it. WTF? Could there be frequencies some people
can't hear that others can, similar to how some animals hear frequencies
that no human can hear? I asked people of different ages and there was only
one other person about my age who didn't hear anything at all, but some
close to my age heard it loud and clear. I have never had a reason to think
my hearing is impaired.


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Old 09-06-2010, 01:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

Cheryl wrote:

Today I got my new laptop at work and the help desk brought
it in and said they had to send it back because it was making
a high-pitched sound that was annoying. I couldn't hear it.
I asked a couple of others to come listen to my laptop and tell
me what they heard, and without knowing I couldn't hear it and
without knowing the help desk was going to send it back, everyone
said high-pitched sound, maybe hard drive or maybe video.
More intrigued at why I couldn't hear this, I asked others, and
some even said it was giving them a headache to hear it. WTF?
Could there be frequencies some people can't hear that others
can, similar to how some animals hear frequencies that no human
can hear? I asked people of different ages and there was only
one other person about my age who didn't hear anything at all,
but some close to my age heard it loud and clear. I have never
had a reason to think my hearing is impaired.


I would recommend making an appointment with audiology for a hearing
test. You can have reduced high-frequency hearing without it
amounting to an impairment, but it's best to get a baseline
so you can track whether any hearing loss is progressing.


Steve
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

Cheryl wrote:
No where else to ask this, plus you're all a smart bunch.

Today I got my new laptop at work and the help desk brought it in and
said they had to send it back because it was making a high-pitched sound
that was annoying. I couldn't hear it. I asked a couple of others to
come listen to my laptop and tell me what they heard, and without
knowing I couldn't hear it and without knowing the help desk was going
to send it back, everyone said high-pitched sound, maybe hard drive or
maybe video. More intrigued at why I couldn't hear this, I asked
others, and some even said it was giving them a headache to hear it.
WTF? Could there be frequencies some people can't hear that others can,
similar to how some animals hear frequencies that no human can hear? I
asked people of different ages and there was only one other person about
my age who didn't hear anything at all, but some close to my age heard
it loud and clear. I have never had a reason to think my hearing is
impaired.



Have you attended a lot of rock concerts? Do you play the radio loudly
in the car? Mow with a gas mower and no ear protection? Use a chain
saw? Lots of loud noise or just aging can affect your high frequency
hearing range. You may not be impaired for normal conversation and
still not be able to hear high frequency sounds.

gloria p
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

"Steve Pope" wrote in message
...
Cheryl wrote:


I have never
had a reason to think my hearing is impaired.


I would recommend making an appointment with audiology for a hearing
test. You can have reduced high-frequency hearing without it
amounting to an impairment, but it's best to get a baseline
so you can track whether any hearing loss is progressing.


I think I will. Not that I want to hear annoying high-pitched noises, but
it makes me wonder what else I'm not hearing.

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Old 09-06-2010, 02:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

On 6/8/2010 5:43 PM, Cheryl wrote:
No where else to ask this, plus you're all a smart bunch.

Today I got my new laptop at work and the help desk brought it in and
said they had to send it back because it was making a high-pitched sound
that was annoying. I couldn't hear it. I asked a couple of others to
come listen to my laptop and tell me what they heard, and without
knowing I couldn't hear it and without knowing the help desk was going
to send it back, everyone said high-pitched sound, maybe hard drive or
maybe video. More intrigued at why I couldn't hear this, I asked others,
and some even said it was giving them a headache to hear it. WTF? Could
there be frequencies some people can't hear that others can, similar to
how some animals hear frequencies that no human can hear? I asked people
of different ages and there was only one other person about my age who
didn't hear anything at all, but some close to my age heard it loud and
clear. I have never had a reason to think my hearing is impaired.


The first thing I would do is go to a doctor to see if you have a ear
blockage from excess wax inside. Some people produce more than others,
and cleaning is not possible too far inside your ears as you no doubt
know. I have to use an over the counter earwax removal product regularly
otherwise my ears get plugged deep inside. If that is ok and nothing is
found like a wax plug issue then a hearing test is in order.




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Old 09-06-2010, 02:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

"Andy" wrote in message ...
"Cheryl" wrote:



Cheryl,

Being an avid scannist (wide band scanner listener) and licensed ham
radio enthusiast, there's no truth to any frequency ear troubles. \

There's some 'puter hum to be heard but, it's not at all painful or
bothersome. 'Puter fan noise.


Oh, I can hear the fan and the normal hard drive noises. Do you remember
older TVs that sometimes put out a high frequency whine when the screen was
mostly white, then it would sound normal when darker colors took over?
That's why I tend to think the high-pitched sound was related to the video
even though I couldn't hear it. The youngest guy who was the most annoyed
by the sound stood by it and told me to power it off, and as soon as it went
off, he said it stopped. For me, again, nothing. Weird. The only other
person who didn't hear the sound was in my office at the time and he was
just as surprised as I was at everyone's reaction. I really thought at
first it was a joke. It would make a good April fools day joke to pull on
someone though.


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Old 09-06-2010, 02:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

In article ,
"Cheryl" wrote:

No where else to ask this, plus you're all a smart bunch.

Today I got my new laptop at work and the help desk brought it in and said
they had to send it back because it was making a high-pitched sound that was
annoying. I couldn't hear it. I asked a couple of others to come listen to
my laptop and tell me what they heard, and without knowing I couldn't hear
it and without knowing the help desk was going to send it back, everyone
said high-pitched sound, maybe hard drive or maybe video. More intrigued at
why I couldn't hear this, I asked others, and some even said it was giving
them a headache to hear it. WTF? Could there be frequencies some people
can't hear that others can, similar to how some animals hear frequencies
that no human can hear? I asked people of different ages and there was only
one other person about my age who didn't hear anything at all, but some
close to my age heard it loud and clear. I have never had a reason to think
my hearing is impaired.


The upper frequencies are the first to go. I knew a Pathologist at work
that was unable to hear the alarm on the tissue processor as it was very
high pitched.

It was quite audible to me and others.

Anyone that routinely listens to LOUD music, either using earphones or
at dance clubs, tends to lose the upper hearing ranges. I learned that
in my Human Anatomy and Physiology class in college, but here is a cite:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensorineural_hearing_loss
--
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

rhelsenborg wrote:

The first thing I would do is go to a doctor to see if you have a ear
blockage from excess wax inside. Some people produce more than others,
and cleaning is not possible too far inside your ears as you no doubt
know. I have to use an over the counter earwax removal product regularly
otherwise my ears get plugged deep inside. If that is ok and nothing is
found like a wax plug issue then a hearing test is in order.


This is a very good point, however as part of the audiology exam the
audiologist will check to see if there is too much earwax such
that it is impeding hearing. So you don't really need to make
a separate ear-cleaning appointment (with an additional co-pay,
etc.)

Steve
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

Cheryl wrote:
"Steve Pope" wrote in message
...
Cheryl wrote:


I have never
had a reason to think my hearing is impaired.


I would recommend making an appointment with audiology for a hearing
test. You can have reduced high-frequency hearing without it
amounting to an impairment, but it's best to get a baseline
so you can track whether any hearing loss is progressing.


I think I will. Not that I want to hear annoying high-pitched
noises, but it makes me wonder what else I'm not hearing.


You know there is something they call Mosquito, along those lines,
it's a high pitched sound they have used in areas where young
people congregate ... supposedly adults can't hear it but it drives
the younger people nuts. They leave the area. Higher frequencies
are the first to go as you age, they say.

I don't think I have the best hearing, at all, but I never had any
trouble hearing it on the tv shows where they demonstrated it,
so who knows.

nancy
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

"gloria.p" wrote in message
...
Cheryl wrote:
No where else to ask this, plus you're all a smart bunch.


Have you attended a lot of rock concerts?


Yes

Do you play the radio loudly
in the car?


Yes

Mow with a gas mower and no ear protection? Use a chain
saw?


Yes, no respectively.

Lots of loud noise or just aging can affect your high frequency
hearing range. You may not be impaired for normal conversation and still
not be able to hear high frequency sounds.


Thanks for the feedback. This is all fascinating mostly because it's new.
lol I always figured I'd have some hearing loss from the loud music but it
hasn't manifested until now I guess.




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Old 09-06-2010, 02:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

Lew Hodgett wrote:

1) Too many candles on the cake.
2) Abuse of your hearing in bygone days by listening to loud music,
rock concerts, etc.
3) A combination of 1 & 2 above.


A few more risk factors:

4) Swimming
5) History of using antibiotic ear drops (in the neomycin family)
6) In some cases, even using topical antibiotics in enough of a dose.
(Note neomycin/polymyxin ointment is OTC in the U.S. but the U.K.
has made it prescription-only for this reason.)

Steve
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

"rhelsenborg" wrote in message
...

The first thing I would do is go to a doctor to see if you have a ear
blockage from excess wax inside. Some people produce more than others, and
cleaning is not possible too far inside your ears as you no doubt know. I
have to use an over the counter earwax removal product regularly otherwise
my ears get plugged deep inside. If that is ok and nothing is found like a
wax plug issue then a hearing test is in order.


Guess I will. Thanks.

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Old 09-06-2010, 02:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

"Nancy Young" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

You know there is something they call Mosquito, along those lines,
it's a high pitched sound they have used in areas where young people
congregate ... supposedly adults can't hear it but it drives
the younger people nuts. They leave the area. Higher frequencies are the
first to go as you age, they say.

I've heard of that mosquito thing, but never heard it. Hmmm.

I don't think I have the best hearing, at all, but I never had any
trouble hearing it on the tv shows where they demonstrated it,
so who knows.

nancy


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Old 09-06-2010, 02:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

On 6/8/2010 2:43 PM, Cheryl wrote:
No where else to ask this, plus you're all a smart bunch.

Today I got my new laptop at work and the help desk brought it in and
said they had to send it back because it was making a high-pitched sound
that was annoying. I couldn't hear it. I asked a couple of others to
come listen to my laptop and tell me what they heard, and without
knowing I couldn't hear it and without knowing the help desk was going
to send it back, everyone said high-pitched sound, maybe hard drive or
maybe video. More intrigued at why I couldn't hear this, I asked others,
and some even said it was giving them a headache to hear it. WTF? Could
there be frequencies some people can't hear that others can, similar to
how some animals hear frequencies that no human can hear? I asked people
of different ages and there was only one other person about my age who
didn't hear anything at all, but some close to my age heard it loud and
clear. I have never had a reason to think my hearing is impaired.


A typical teen will be able to hear frequencies up to around 20,000 Hz.
My guess is that any kid would be able to hear it loud and clear.

By the time you're in your 40s, expect it to drop down to below 12,000
Hz. You could have a hearing loss which means that your hearing could be
dropping off around 2,000 Hz. If you do have an impairment, chances are
that you'll be unaware of it. If your family has told you that you're
hard of hearing and that you turn your TV up too loud - you probably
have a significant loss and should make an appointment to have it
checked. Good luck!
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Old 09-06-2010, 03:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default OT --(sorry) Hearing at high frequencies

On 6/8/2010 6:31 PM, Steve Pope wrote:
wrote:

The first thing I would do is go to a doctor to see if you have a ear
blockage from excess wax inside. Some people produce more than others,
and cleaning is not possible too far inside your ears as you no doubt
know. I have to use an over the counter earwax removal product regularly
otherwise my ears get plugged deep inside. If that is ok and nothing is
found like a wax plug issue then a hearing test is in order.


This is a very good point, however as part of the audiology exam the
audiologist will check to see if there is too much earwax such
that it is impeding hearing. So you don't really need to make
a separate ear-cleaning appointment (with an additional co-pay,
etc.)

Steve


That is if the audiologist does that and is thorough in their exam. Not
all of them are, and some might not think of that. If they don't and
nothing is found from the hearing test then a separate appointment would
be in order. But if the patient belongs to kaiser (god forbid!), or
another HMO usually everything is done at the same time if the patient
requests it and is adamant that it all happen at the same time.

rh




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