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Old 07-03-2010, 02:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

Hello
I have been a pizza fanatic hobbyist baker over the last few years,
I have tried alot of dough recipes and different flours, but during the
process of learning to make the dough and trying flours, I finally
figured it was learning to make the dough, so now I have that part
figured out, I want to stay with a flour where I can use it to make brad
along with pizza dough, are the High Gluten flours too strong for both
bread and pizza dough in a home oven. was thinking of trying an
unbleached type flour, what protein percentages will work best or if
someone can recommend a flour that will work best.


thanks
Chet

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Old 07-03-2010, 03:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

Chet wrote:
Hello
I have been a pizza fanatic hobbyist baker over the last few years, I
have tried alot of dough recipes and different flours, but during the
process of learning to make the dough and trying flours, I finally
figured it was learning to make the dough, so now I have that part
figured out, I want to stay with a flour where I can use it to make brad
along with pizza dough, are the High Gluten flours too strong for both
bread and pizza dough in a home oven. was thinking of trying an
unbleached type flour, what protein percentages will work best or if
someone can recommend a flour that will work best.


thanks
Chet



Last time I made pizza, I used half "bread flour" and half
all-purpose. The dough was much easier to handle than my usual
pizza made with straight bread flour. It also took longer to cook.
I don't think it tasted quite as good, but that could be my
imagination.

Bob
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Old 07-03-2010, 05:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

Chet wrote:

I have been a pizza fanatic hobbyist baker over the last few years,
I have tried alot of dough recipes and different flours, but during the
process of learning to make the dough and trying flours, I finally
figured it was learning to make the dough, so now I have that part
figured out, I want to stay with a flour where I can use it to make brad
along with pizza dough, are the High Gluten flours too strong for both
bread and pizza dough in a home oven. was thinking of trying an
unbleached type flour, what protein percentages will work best or if
someone can recommend a flour that will work best.


That all depends on what kind of bread you like to eat.
I happen to like a strong, tough bread like sourdough.
Not everybody likes that.
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Old 07-03-2010, 11:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

Reading from news:rec.food.cooking,
Chet posted:

Hello
I have been a pizza fanatic hobbyist baker over the last few years,
I have tried alot of dough recipes and different flours, but during the
process of learning to make the dough and trying flours, I finally
figured it was learning to make the dough, so now I have that part
figured out, I want to stay with a flour where I can use it to make brad
along with pizza dough, are the High Gluten flours too strong for both
bread and pizza dough in a home oven. was thinking of trying an
unbleached type flour, what protein percentages will work best or if
someone can recommend a flour that will work best.


Well, what pizza dough did you settle on? I'd like to try it.

Myself:

3.5 cups of flour
1 tbsp yeast
1 tbsp baking powder
1 cup of hot water
1/4 cup of melted butter
1 tbsp sugar
3/4-1 tbsp salt

Optionally throw in a little basil or oregano and some garlic powder for a
little extra flavor in the crust.


Do the usual. Put water in mixing bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar, add
salt, dissolve, add flour and butter. Mix with a dough hook until it no
longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Cover and let it rise for an
hour.

When rolling it out, I don't use flour on the surface, but olive oil.
Smear olive oil on the rolling surface, and in as few movements as
possible, roll the dough out to fit the pan. Perforate the dough, then
trim to the edge of the pan using the rolling pin for a perfectly round
dough.

I find I can sauce, cheese, and top the dough while it's raw, then bake on
the bottom rack of the oven at 450 degrees. I let it go for about 13
minutes, then I come back and check every minute or so for the nice brown
marks to start appearing on the cheese, indiciating it's almost done.



Damaeus
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Old 08-03-2010, 05:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours


"Damaeus" wrote in message
...
Reading from news:rec.food.cooking,
Chet posted:

Hello
I have been a pizza fanatic hobbyist baker over the last few years,
I have tried alot of dough recipes and different flours, but during the
process of learning to make the dough and trying flours, I finally
figured it was learning to make the dough, so now I have that part
figured out, I want to stay with a flour where I can use it to make brad
along with pizza dough, are the High Gluten flours too strong for both
bread and pizza dough in a home oven. was thinking of trying an
unbleached type flour, what protein percentages will work best or if
someone can recommend a flour that will work best.


Well, what pizza dough did you settle on? I'd like to try it.

Myself:

3.5 cups of flour
1 tbsp yeast
1 tbsp baking powder
1 cup of hot water
1/4 cup of melted butter
1 tbsp sugar
3/4-1 tbsp salt


Your dough is too dry. I use 1.25 cups H20 to 3 cups flour. You need a wet
dough for pizza, like ciabatta.
Too much fat; for 3 cups flour I use 1 TB EVO or none.


Optionally throw in a little basil or oregano and some garlic powder for a
little extra flavor in the crust.


Do the usual. Put water in mixing bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar, add
salt, dissolve, add flour and butter. Mix with a dough hook until it no
longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Cover and let it rise for an
hour.

When rolling it out, I don't use flour on the surface, but olive oil.
Smear olive oil on the rolling surface, and in as few movements as
possible, roll the dough out to fit the pan. Perforate the dough, then
trim to the edge of the pan using the rolling pin for a perfectly round
dough.


You're rolling it on oil???? What are you rolling it on? How do you get
onto the pizza stone???


I find I can sauce, cheese, and top the dough while it's raw, then bake on
the bottom rack of the oven at 450 degrees. I let it go for about 13
minutes, then I come back and check every minute or so for the nice brown
marks to start appearing on the cheese, indiciating it's almost done.

Damaeus


Baking Temp. is too low. Bake at oven's maximum temp. On a well heated stone
the pizza should be done in 8-9 minutes depending on the toppings.

Kent




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Old 09-03-2010, 01:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

Reading from news:rec.food.cooking,
"Kent" posted:

"Damaeus" wrote in message
...

Well, what pizza dough did you settle on? I'd like to try it.

Myself:

3.5 cups of flour
1 tbsp yeast
1 tbsp baking powder
1 cup of hot water
1/4 cup of melted butter
1 tbsp sugar
3/4-1 tbsp salt


Your dough is too dry. I use 1.25 cups H20 to 3 cups flour. You need a wet
dough for pizza, like ciabatta.


If it was any wetter, it would stick to my fingers like biscuit dough.
Plus, the butter has some water in it.

Too much fat; for 3 cups flour I use 1 TB EVO or none.


It's not "too much fat". I'd say yours has too little fat.

Optionally throw in a little basil or oregano and some garlic powder for a
little extra flavor in the crust.


Do the usual. Put water in mixing bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar, add
salt, dissolve, add flour and butter. Mix with a dough hook until it no
longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Cover and let it rise for an
hour.

When rolling it out, I don't use flour on the surface, but olive oil.
Smear olive oil on the rolling surface, and in as few movements as
possible, roll the dough out to fit the pan. Perforate the dough, then
trim to the edge of the pan using the rolling pin for a perfectly round
dough.


You're rolling it on oil???? What are you rolling it on? How do you get
onto the pizza stone???


I'm rolling it on a Formica counter, and I don't use a pizza stone, but a
pan with holes in it.

I find I can sauce, cheese, and top the dough while it's raw, then bake on
the bottom rack of the oven at 450 degrees. I let it go for about 13
minutes, then I come back and check every minute or so for the nice brown
marks to start appearing on the cheese, indiciating it's almost done.

Damaeus


Baking Temp. is too low. Bake at oven's maximum temp. On a well heated stone
the pizza should be done in 8-9 minutes depending on the toppings.


I put quite a bit on there sometimes. If I baked an "everything" pizza at
600 degrees, it'd probably burn on the edges and be half-cooked in the
middle.

Damaeus
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Old 09-03-2010, 09:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

On Mon, 08 Mar 2010 19:59:01 -0600, Damaeus
wrote:

I put quite a bit on there sometimes. If I baked an "everything" pizza at
600 degrees, it'd probably burn on the edges and be half-cooked in the
middle.


Oh, come on... does you oven really go to 600? Be honest.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
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Old 09-03-2010, 10:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 08 Mar 2010 19:59:01 -0600, Damaeus
wrote:

I put quite a bit on there sometimes. If I baked an "everything" pizza
at
600 degrees, it'd probably burn on the edges and be half-cooked in the
middle.


Oh, come on... does you oven really go to 600? Be honest.

--
If so, what brand and model # is it? We recently took a pizza stone into
the Dacor showroom to see how far it would heat up. I think it stopped at
about 550F, though allowable time screwed up the whole experiment.


Kent



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Old 09-03-2010, 04:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

On Tue, 9 Mar 2010 02:58:43 -0800, "Kent" wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 08 Mar 2010 19:59:01 -0600, Damaeus
wrote:

I put quite a bit on there sometimes. If I baked an "everything" pizza
at
600 degrees, it'd probably burn on the edges and be half-cooked in the
middle.


Oh, come on... does your oven really go to 600? Be honest.

--

If so, what brand and model # is it? We recently took a pizza stone into
the Dacor showroom to see how far it would heat up. I think it stopped at
about 550F, though allowable time screwed up the whole experiment.

Kent

Tell me more about the show room that actually lets you heat up a tile
and what did you use to measure the heat?

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
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Old 11-03-2010, 05:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

Reading from news:rec.food.cooking,
sf posted:

On Mon, 08 Mar 2010 19:59:01 -0600, Damaeus
wrote:

I put quite a bit on there sometimes. If I baked an "everything" pizza at
600 degrees, it'd probably burn on the edges and be half-cooked in the
middle.


Oh, come on... does you oven really go to 600+ALA-? Be honest.


Be honest? As if I'd lie otherwise? I thought it went to 575, then
broil, which I assumed would just leave the burners on without cycling
them on and off, but it actually goes to 500, then 525, then broil. The
thermometer I have hanging inside it goes to 600, so I assume it's
theoretically possible for ovens to go to 600 degrees or they wouldn't
need oven thermometers with "600" on them. I've never experimented to see
how hot it'd actually get, but I had a mild bit of exaggeration in my
previoius post.

Damaeus


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Old 11-03-2010, 06:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pizza flours

On Thu, 11 Mar 2010 11:23:20 -0600, Damaeus
wrote:

Reading from news:rec.food.cooking,
sf posted:

On Mon, 08 Mar 2010 19:59:01 -0600, Damaeus
wrote:

I put quite a bit on there sometimes. If I baked an "everything" pizza at
600 degrees, it'd probably burn on the edges and be half-cooked in the
middle.


Oh, come on... does you oven really go to 600? Be honest.


Be honest? As if I'd lie otherwise? I thought it went to 575, then
broil, which I assumed would just leave the burners on without cycling
them on and off, but it actually goes to 500, then 525, then broil. The
thermometer I have hanging inside it goes to 600, so I assume it's
theoretically possible for ovens to go to 600 degrees or they wouldn't
need oven thermometers with "600" on them. I've never experimented to see
how hot it'd actually get, but I had a mild bit of exaggeration in my
previoius post.

Thanks. I suspect the 600 is there for people who have ovens that
are too hot instead of too cool. Either way, they need a repairman.


--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.


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