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Old 29-09-2004, 09:45 AM
James Shugg
 
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Default Neapolitan ragu

Someone posted a recipe for ragu from Bologna, which reminded me of a
recipe I have at home for the Neapolitan version, which I have never
tried. It's quite different, as it involves slow cooking whole cuts of
pork (leg and rib), along with sausage, tomato, onion, etc, in a pot
on top of the stove and gradually adding tiny amounts of red wine,
white wine and then water over a period of up to six hours. This
pricess is called "tirato" or something similar, from the Italian for
"pull", as the liquid pulls out the flavour of the meat. Because you
have to tend it constantly for all that time (not enough liquid, and
it burns, too much, and the sauce doesn't work), ragu is a symbol of a
a mother and wife's love and care for her family. The meat is removed
and served as main course while the ragu sauce is served with pasta as
entree (ie starter for you Americans).

Anyway, has anyone here made ragu in this way? Now that winter is on
the way I kinda like the idea of standing in the kitchen preparing a
meal for my friends in this way, while knocking back a glass of red or
three. But is the result really worth the effort, ie so much more
special than a simple pasta dish followed by a roast, which would
require much less effort and attention?

Cheers, James

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Old 29-09-2004, 10:06 AM
Luca Pinotti
 
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James Shugg wrote:
Someone posted a recipe for ragu from Bologna, which reminded me of a
recipe I have at home for the Neapolitan version, which I have never
tried. It's quite different, as it involves slow cooking whole cuts of
pork (leg and rib), along with sausage, tomato, onion, etc, in a pot
on top of the stove and gradually adding tiny amounts of red wine,
white wine and then water over a period of up to six hours. This


Are you sure?

http://www.dentronapoli.it/Cucina/ragų.htm
http://www.portanapoli.com/Ita/Cucina/body_ga_ragu.html

Both sites are from Naples.

Luca


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Old 29-09-2004, 02:55 PM
James Shugg
 
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"Luca Pinotti" wrote in message ...
James Shugg wrote:
Someone posted a recipe for ragu from Bologna, which reminded me of a
recipe I have at home for the Neapolitan version, which I have never
tried. It's quite different, as it involves slow cooking whole cuts of
pork (leg and rib), along with sausage, tomato, onion, etc, in a pot
on top of the stove and gradually adding tiny amounts of red wine,
white wine and then water over a period of up to six hours. This


Are you sure?

http://www.dentronapoli.it/Cucina/ragų.htm
http://www.portanapoli.com/Ita/Cucina/body_ga_ragu.html

Both sites are from Naples.

Luca


Sorry, I don't speak much Italian, but I gather those recipes are
different to the one I briefly described? What interests me though is
that the second site makes mention of the poem "Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday", which is also discussed in the preamble to my recipe (from
a beautiful little book called simply "Pasta Sauces" by Diane Seed,
published in 1988). She wrote that the poet was criticising his wife's
version of ragu, describing it just as "meat and tomato", whereas his
Mum's, made the proper way with time and love and care, was the real
thing. So I suppose there are different ways of doing it, some not as
good as others.

My question was, does anyone have experience of doing it the long way,
and is the result worth it?

Cheers, James

PS apologies if this post is repeated, had an internal server error.
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Old 29-09-2004, 05:53 PM
Joseph
 
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(James Shugg) wrote in message . com...
Someone posted a recipe for ragu from Bologna, which reminded me of a
recipe I have at home for the Neapolitan version, which I have never
tried. It's quite different, as it involves slow cooking whole cuts of
pork (leg and rib), along with sausage, tomato, onion, etc, in a pot
on top of the stove and gradually adding tiny amounts of red wine,
white wine and then water over a period of up to six hours. This
pricess is called "tirato" or something similar, from the Italian for
"pull", as the liquid pulls out the flavour of the meat. Because you
have to tend it constantly for all that time (not enough liquid, and
it burns, too much, and the sauce doesn't work), ragu is a symbol of a
a mother and wife's love and care for her family. The meat is removed
and served as main course while the ragu sauce is served with pasta as
entree (ie starter for you Americans).

Anyway, has anyone here made ragu in this way? Now that winter is on
the way I kinda like the idea of standing in the kitchen preparing a
meal for my friends in this way, while knocking back a glass of red or
three. But is the result really worth the effort, ie so much more
special than a simple pasta dish followed by a roast, which would
require much less effort and attention?


You will find few for a 1800 recipe.

Have you something newer to taste?

Joseph


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