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Old 28-09-2004, 02:15 PM
Bruce K.
 
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Default Why does my first pancake always come out ugly?

I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...


Thanks,

Bruce

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Old 28-09-2004, 02:21 PM
Dave Smith
 
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Default

"Bruce K." wrote:

I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.


My guess would be that the pan is not hot enough. Heat it until a little
water splashed on the pan dances around. And for goodness sake, do
yourself a favour and get rid of the mix. Pancakes are very simple to
make and use pantry staples, flour, salt, sugar, baking powder, milk, egg
and oil or melted butter. Even better are buttermilk pancakes.

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Old 28-09-2004, 02:35 PM
TLOlczyk
 
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Default

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 09:15:23 -0400, Bruce K.
wrote:

I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...

As an aside, the way I make pancakes is to follow this cycle:
1) Wipe skillet surface with butter, quickly wip up excess.
( This is tricky, you have to do both quick or you will burn
yourself. ) with heat low.
2) Pour batter on *hot* skillet.
3) The batter quickly produces bubbles. wait untill the batter is
almost 100% "bubbly"
4) Flip turn heat on high. Wait a while, checking the uncooked side.
5) When cooked remove go to 1.

The only time the heat is on a non low temperature, is in 4. Generally
the pan stays hot during the rest, but it takes a bit of timing.

This way of cooking is very sensitive to the temperature of the pan.
If I let it cool too much in 3 or I heat it too much in 4, it upsets
the cycle.

It is very important to get the skillet hot enough for the first
pancake. I suggest that you check the skillet for heat on the first
one. Take a drop of room temp water and drop on skillet. It should
boil immediately and all the water should vanish within 2 seconds.
Otherwise the pan is not hot enough.



The reply-to email address is .
This is an address I ignore.
To reply via email, remove 2002 and change yahoo to
interaccess,

**
Thaddeus L. Olczyk, PhD

There is a difference between
*thinking* you know something,
and *knowing* you know something.
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Old 28-09-2004, 02:35 PM
TLOlczyk
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 09:15:23 -0400, Bruce K.
wrote:

I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...

As an aside, the way I make pancakes is to follow this cycle:
1) Wipe skillet surface with butter, quickly wip up excess.
( This is tricky, you have to do both quick or you will burn
yourself. ) with heat low.
2) Pour batter on *hot* skillet.
3) The batter quickly produces bubbles. wait untill the batter is
almost 100% "bubbly"
4) Flip turn heat on high. Wait a while, checking the uncooked side.
5) When cooked remove go to 1.

The only time the heat is on a non low temperature, is in 4. Generally
the pan stays hot during the rest, but it takes a bit of timing.

This way of cooking is very sensitive to the temperature of the pan.
If I let it cool too much in 3 or I heat it too much in 4, it upsets
the cycle.

It is very important to get the skillet hot enough for the first
pancake. I suggest that you check the skillet for heat on the first
one. Take a drop of room temp water and drop on skillet. It should
boil immediately and all the water should vanish within 2 seconds.
Otherwise the pan is not hot enough.



The reply-to email address is .
This is an address I ignore.
To reply via email, remove 2002 and change yahoo to
interaccess,

**
Thaddeus L. Olczyk, PhD

There is a difference between
*thinking* you know something,
and *knowing* you know something.
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Old 28-09-2004, 03:02 PM
ScratchMonkey
 
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Default

Bruce K. wrote in
:

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.


It's probably picking up the excess shortening on the pan. Never bothers me
because that one goes on the bottom of the stack, and I eat them in layers
so I never see it again.

(My recipe is Bisquick, eggs, and buttermilk, plus some orange zest. I like
mine thin, so I add regular milk to thin the batter.)


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Old 28-09-2004, 07:10 PM
TLOlczyk
 
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Default

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 09:21:05 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

"Bruce K." wrote:

I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.


My guess would be that the pan is not hot enough. Heat it until a little
water splashed on the pan dances around. And for goodness sake, do
yourself a favour and get rid of the mix. Pancakes are very simple to
make and use pantry staples, flour, salt, sugar, baking powder, milk, egg
and oil or melted butter. Even better are buttermilk pancakes.

Does Bisquick count as a mix?


The reply-to email address is .
This is an address I ignore.
To reply via email, remove 2002 and change yahoo to
interaccess,

**
Thaddeus L. Olczyk, PhD

There is a difference between
*thinking* you know something,
and *knowing* you know something.
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Old 28-09-2004, 08:00 PM
JimLane
 
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Default

Bruce K. wrote:
I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...


Thanks,

Bruce



Your dog?


jim
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Old 28-09-2004, 08:00 PM
JimLane
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bruce K. wrote:
I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...


Thanks,

Bruce



Your dog?


jim
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Old 28-09-2004, 08:16 PM
Dimitri
 
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Default


"Bruce K." wrote in message
...
I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...


Thanks,

Bruce


Usually there are 2 reasons:

A: The pan is not at the proper temperature. "blotchy" to me would
indicate the pan is too hot.
B. The pan is not properly oiled.
C. All of the above.



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Old 28-09-2004, 08:16 PM
Dimitri
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bruce K." wrote in message
...
I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...


Thanks,

Bruce


Usually there are 2 reasons:

A: The pan is not at the proper temperature. "blotchy" to me would
indicate the pan is too hot.
B. The pan is not properly oiled.
C. All of the above.





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Old 28-09-2004, 08:45 PM
Felice Friese
 
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Default


"Bruce K." wrote in message
...
I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...

Thanks,

Bruce


Some wit once compared the first pancake to the first child, claiming that
the first ones never came out right and you might as well just throw them
away.

Felice
A first child


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Old 28-09-2004, 08:50 PM
Dave Smith
 
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Default

TLOlczyk wrote:

water splashed on the pan dances around. And for goodness sake, do
yourself a favour and get rid of the mix. Pancakes are very simple to
make and use pantry staples, flour, salt, sugar, baking powder, milk, egg
and oil or melted butter. Even better are buttermilk pancakes.

Does Bisquick count as a mix?


In my books anything that comes premixed and contains only basic kitchen
staples is a mix and usually a waste of money. There is nothing in pancakes
that should not be on hand in a kitchen of even a rank amateur cook. The same
goes for biscuits.



Speaking of pancakes........ I was in the grocery store last week helping my
mother with her weekly shopping. I saw a guy walk by with three boxes of Eggos
and three 1/2 liter bottles of maple syrup, the real stuff not "pancake syrup"
(yech). I couldn't help but think that there was a guy who really liked syrup
on his waffles. Maybe he should have used a cart of a basket because while
he was standing in line to check out he dropped a bottle of syrup. What a
mess.


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Old 28-09-2004, 08:51 PM
Lynn Gifford
 
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Default

ScratchMonkey wrote in message news:

(My recipe is Bisquick, eggs, and buttermilk, plus some orange zest. I like
mine thin, so I add regular milk to thin the batter.)

_____________________________
I like 'em thin too - hate the thick fluffy dry ones - they give me
cotton mouth. Try making the batter (from a mix is fine) the night
before then thin it with milk before you cook. Voila - thin & tender -
like crepes.
Lynn in Fargo
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Old 28-09-2004, 08:51 PM
Lynn Gifford
 
Posts: n/a
Default

ScratchMonkey wrote in message news:

(My recipe is Bisquick, eggs, and buttermilk, plus some orange zest. I like
mine thin, so I add regular milk to thin the batter.)

_____________________________
I like 'em thin too - hate the thick fluffy dry ones - they give me
cotton mouth. Try making the batter (from a mix is fine) the night
before then thin it with milk before you cook. Voila - thin & tender -
like crepes.
Lynn in Fargo
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Old 28-09-2004, 08:58 PM
Andy
 
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Default

JimLane wrote in news:[email protected]
1.nethere.net:

Bruce K. wrote:
I'm using Aunt Jemima mix.

First pancake ALWAYS comes out blotchy on the first side and slightly
better after flipping.

When the second pancake is made the first side comes out pefrectlly.

Guess who eats the first pancake...


Thanks,

Bruce



Your dog?


jim



Jim,

That brings back a great memory. One breakfast, we gave our dog a
pancake. She prompty took it outside and buried it... "for tough times,"
we figured.

Andy



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