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Jessica V. 13-09-2004 02:14 AM

Apple season
 
Today was apple picking, a half bushel of sweet/tart MacIntosh apples.
The orchard is one that friends of my parents owned when I was a child,
lots of memories there, running down into the orchard to pick an apple
for a snack, talking to the migrant Jamaican apple pickers, hide and
seek, apple fights (ouch), my brother peeing on the electric
fence...typical kid stuff. ;0) But what I remembered most about the
orchard were a few trees with some unusual varieties of apples, sadly
those trees are now gone. The tree that produced "cannonballs" apples
weighing over 20 ounces each is gone too, two were enough for a pie.

So far, I've made two apple crisps with my grandmother's recipe. Yeah,
yeah, I know Macs are for eating not cooking, but I like how they cook up.

There are still pies and pancakes to be made. Will make another trip
for inexpensive utility apples for apple sauce and apple butter.

I also intend to try an Apple Brownie recipe from _Cooking Downeast_,
Marjorie Standish, 1969.

1 stick margarine
1 c sugar
1 egg
2 medium apples, pared, cored and chopped fine
1/2 c chopped nuts
1 c flour
1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t soda
1/4 t salt
1/2 t cinnamon

Cream margarine. Add sugar gradually. Beat egg until light and beat
into mixture until creamy. Mix in the chopped apples and nuts. Sift
flour and measure. Sift together with powder, soda, salt and cinnamon.
Stir lightly into apple mixture.

Turn ital a buttered 7 by 11-inch pan and bake at 350 degrees for 40
minutes. Cool, cut into bars.

Jessica

Marge 13-09-2004 03:37 PM

How great! I live in NYC area, and have been upstate apple picking,
grabbed a pumpkin while I was at it. Beautiful countryside. I love
fall probably the most out of all the seasons.

I have a French friend who asked me for apple butter (how she heard
about that, I'm not sure).

Your recipe sounds tasty. I'll have to give that a try.

Someone was asking about apple pancakes recently. How do you make
that? (or is it just a pancake recipe with apples added?)


Marge 13-09-2004 03:37 PM

How great! I live in NYC area, and have been upstate apple picking,
grabbed a pumpkin while I was at it. Beautiful countryside. I love
fall probably the most out of all the seasons.

I have a French friend who asked me for apple butter (how she heard
about that, I'm not sure).

Your recipe sounds tasty. I'll have to give that a try.

Someone was asking about apple pancakes recently. How do you make
that? (or is it just a pancake recipe with apples added?)


Kate Connally 13-09-2004 06:12 PM

"Jessica V." wrote:

Today was apple picking, a half bushel of sweet/tart MacIntosh apples.
The orchard is one that friends of my parents owned when I was a child,
lots of memories there, running down into the orchard to pick an apple
for a snack, talking to the migrant Jamaican apple pickers, hide and
seek, apple fights (ouch), my brother peeing on the electric
fence...typical kid stuff. ;0) But what I remembered most about the
orchard were a few trees with some unusual varieties of apples, sadly
those trees are now gone. The tree that produced "cannonballs" apples
weighing over 20 ounces each is gone too, two were enough for a pie.

So far, I've made two apple crisps with my grandmother's recipe. Yeah,
yeah, I know Macs are for eating not cooking, but I like how they cook up.


Me, too! Plus I love the flavor of Macs so I use
them for just about everything. No other apple can
match the flavor. And they have a much better texture
than most other apples. I hate grainy apples.

My sister and I are headed up to VT in a few weeks.
I'm looking forward to going to the Cold Hollow
Cider Mill to get some cider. They use mostly Macintosh.
Macs make *the* best cider!

Kate

--
Kate Connally
If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
Until you bite their heads off.
What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?


Scott 13-09-2004 06:19 PM

In article ,
"Marge" wrote:

How great! I live in NYC area, and have been upstate apple picking,
grabbed a pumpkin while I was at it. Beautiful countryside. I love
fall probably the most out of all the seasons.


Where upstate do you go?

--
to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
please mail OT responses only

Marge 13-09-2004 08:35 PM

It was a few years back, but I remember it was very close to Bard
College. A long drive, I know. Pretty scenery, and historical
mansions in the vicinity to tour too.


Julia Altshuler 20-09-2004 01:15 AM

Marge wrote:

Someone was asking about apple pancakes recently. How do you make
that? (or is it just a pancake recipe with apples added?)



We make a baked pancake and add apples (or pears).

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Melt 1 Tbs of bacon grease, magarine or butter in a 10" cast iron
skillet and place in oven to get hot.

Beat 3 eggs and add 1/2 cup milk, 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup sugar.
Experiment with the amount of sugar. It needs some but can get too
sweet. Mix well and pour into the hot skillet. Immediately add a
thinly sliced fanned apple. Put back in the oven to bake for 15 minutes
or until the top is puffy and golden. Sprinkle with a little more sugar.


Apples vary in how quickly they bake and how mushy you like them. You
can saute the apples in the skillet to start and add at the last minute
with sprinkled sugar to heat through.


I'm someone who can't stand the practice of automatically adding
cinnamon to anything with apples so we leave that out, but you could
certainly make that cinnamon sugar at the end.


--Lia


Julia Altshuler 20-09-2004 01:15 AM

Marge wrote:

Someone was asking about apple pancakes recently. How do you make
that? (or is it just a pancake recipe with apples added?)



We make a baked pancake and add apples (or pears).

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Melt 1 Tbs of bacon grease, magarine or butter in a 10" cast iron
skillet and place in oven to get hot.

Beat 3 eggs and add 1/2 cup milk, 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup sugar.
Experiment with the amount of sugar. It needs some but can get too
sweet. Mix well and pour into the hot skillet. Immediately add a
thinly sliced fanned apple. Put back in the oven to bake for 15 minutes
or until the top is puffy and golden. Sprinkle with a little more sugar.


Apples vary in how quickly they bake and how mushy you like them. You
can saute the apples in the skillet to start and add at the last minute
with sprinkled sugar to heat through.


I'm someone who can't stand the practice of automatically adding
cinnamon to anything with apples so we leave that out, but you could
certainly make that cinnamon sugar at the end.


--Lia


GoombaP 24-09-2004 08:14 AM

On the farm in Alcona, Co., Michigan we had a Wolf River apple tree. It
often produced apples so big that one of them made an 8" pie. Full! Most
often however it took 2 apples. It was a typical backyard apple variety that
never made it commercially because the fruit bruised easily and didn't store
well. How many such varieties of other fruits have we lost?

"Jessica V." wrote in message
...
Today was apple picking, a half bushel of sweet/tart MacIntosh apples. The
orchard is one that friends of my parents owned when I was a child, lots
of memories there, running down into the orchard to pick an apple for a
snack, talking to the migrant Jamaican apple pickers, hide and seek, apple
fights (ouch), my brother peeing on the electric fence...typical kid
stuff. ;0) But what I remembered most about the orchard were a few trees
with some unusual varieties of apples, sadly those trees are now gone.
The tree that produced "cannonballs" apples weighing over 20 ounces each
is gone too, two were enough for a pie.

So far, I've made two apple crisps with my grandmother's recipe. Yeah,
yeah, I know Macs are for eating not cooking, but I like how they cook up.

There are still pies and pancakes to be made. Will make another trip for
inexpensive utility apples for apple sauce and apple butter.

I also intend to try an Apple Brownie recipe from _Cooking Downeast_,
Marjorie Standish, 1969.

1 stick margarine
1 c sugar
1 egg
2 medium apples, pared, cored and chopped fine
1/2 c chopped nuts
1 c flour
1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t soda
1/4 t salt
1/2 t cinnamon

Cream margarine. Add sugar gradually. Beat egg until light and beat into
mixture until creamy. Mix in the chopped apples and nuts. Sift flour and
measure. Sift together with powder, soda, salt and cinnamon. Stir lightly
into apple mixture.

Turn ital a buttered 7 by 11-inch pan and bake at 350 degrees for 40
minutes. Cool, cut into bars.

Jessica




GoombaP 24-09-2004 08:14 AM

On the farm in Alcona, Co., Michigan we had a Wolf River apple tree. It
often produced apples so big that one of them made an 8" pie. Full! Most
often however it took 2 apples. It was a typical backyard apple variety that
never made it commercially because the fruit bruised easily and didn't store
well. How many such varieties of other fruits have we lost?

"Jessica V." wrote in message
...
Today was apple picking, a half bushel of sweet/tart MacIntosh apples. The
orchard is one that friends of my parents owned when I was a child, lots
of memories there, running down into the orchard to pick an apple for a
snack, talking to the migrant Jamaican apple pickers, hide and seek, apple
fights (ouch), my brother peeing on the electric fence...typical kid
stuff. ;0) But what I remembered most about the orchard were a few trees
with some unusual varieties of apples, sadly those trees are now gone.
The tree that produced "cannonballs" apples weighing over 20 ounces each
is gone too, two were enough for a pie.

So far, I've made two apple crisps with my grandmother's recipe. Yeah,
yeah, I know Macs are for eating not cooking, but I like how they cook up.

There are still pies and pancakes to be made. Will make another trip for
inexpensive utility apples for apple sauce and apple butter.

I also intend to try an Apple Brownie recipe from _Cooking Downeast_,
Marjorie Standish, 1969.

1 stick margarine
1 c sugar
1 egg
2 medium apples, pared, cored and chopped fine
1/2 c chopped nuts
1 c flour
1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t soda
1/4 t salt
1/2 t cinnamon

Cream margarine. Add sugar gradually. Beat egg until light and beat into
mixture until creamy. Mix in the chopped apples and nuts. Sift flour and
measure. Sift together with powder, soda, salt and cinnamon. Stir lightly
into apple mixture.

Turn ital a buttered 7 by 11-inch pan and bake at 350 degrees for 40
minutes. Cool, cut into bars.

Jessica




Bob (this one) 24-09-2004 11:27 AM

GoombaP wrote:

On the farm in Alcona, Co., Michigan we had a Wolf River apple tree. It
often produced apples so big that one of them made an 8" pie. Full! Most
often however it took 2 apples. It was a typical backyard apple variety that
never made it commercially because the fruit bruised easily and didn't store
well. How many such varieties of other fruits have we lost?


Actually, there are more varieties of apples in the world now than
there have ever been in the past. New hybrids are being developed
everywhere they're grown. The last count of varieties I saw was a
couple years ago and it was up around 7500. Some have undoubtedly been
lost for whatever reasons, but I don't feel as bad about them as I do
about all the lousy tomatoes that have supplanted good ones.

Pastorio

"Jessica V." wrote in message
...

Today was apple picking, a half bushel of sweet/tart MacIntosh apples. The
orchard is one that friends of my parents owned when I was a child, lots
of memories there, running down into the orchard to pick an apple for a
snack, talking to the migrant Jamaican apple pickers, hide and seek, apple
fights (ouch), my brother peeing on the electric fence...typical kid
stuff. ;0) But what I remembered most about the orchard were a few trees
with some unusual varieties of apples, sadly those trees are now gone.
The tree that produced "cannonballs" apples weighing over 20 ounces each
is gone too, two were enough for a pie.

So far, I've made two apple crisps with my grandmother's recipe. Yeah,
yeah, I know Macs are for eating not cooking, but I like how they cook up.

There are still pies and pancakes to be made. Will make another trip for
inexpensive utility apples for apple sauce and apple butter.

I also intend to try an Apple Brownie recipe from _Cooking Downeast_,
Marjorie Standish, 1969.

1 stick margarine
1 c sugar
1 egg
2 medium apples, pared, cored and chopped fine
1/2 c chopped nuts
1 c flour
1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t soda
1/4 t salt
1/2 t cinnamon

Cream margarine. Add sugar gradually. Beat egg until light and beat into
mixture until creamy. Mix in the chopped apples and nuts. Sift flour and
measure. Sift together with powder, soda, salt and cinnamon. Stir lightly
into apple mixture.

Turn ital a buttered 7 by 11-inch pan and bake at 350 degrees for 40
minutes. Cool, cut into bars.

Jessica




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