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Old 09-08-2004, 10:22 PM
alsilvers
 
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Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?

Al

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Old 10-08-2004, 02:24 AM
Richard Periut
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

wrote:

In article ,
says...

Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?

Al


I have no first-hand knowledge of any of the establishments you mention,
but it is a safe bet that they all use good meat. Prime beef, properly
aged and freshly cut. I'd be surprised if any of them rubs the steak
with butter before cooking (a burnt butter taste is very nasty), but
putting a few dabs of herbed butter on the steak immediately after
grilling is common in restaurants that serve good beef, and probably not
even worthy of mention on the menu.

Bob


They personally pick their beef and stamp it with their seal.

However, I've heard of a place in Brooklyn, that's as good as PL.

PL is sort of crowded though.

Rich

--
"Dum Spiro, Spero."

As long as I breath, I hope.

Cicero

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Old 10-08-2004, 02:24 AM
Richard Periut
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

wrote:

In article ,
says...

Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?

Al


I have no first-hand knowledge of any of the establishments you mention,
but it is a safe bet that they all use good meat. Prime beef, properly
aged and freshly cut. I'd be surprised if any of them rubs the steak
with butter before cooking (a burnt butter taste is very nasty), but
putting a few dabs of herbed butter on the steak immediately after
grilling is common in restaurants that serve good beef, and probably not
even worthy of mention on the menu.

Bob


They personally pick their beef and stamp it with their seal.

However, I've heard of a place in Brooklyn, that's as good as PL.

PL is sort of crowded though.

Rich

--
"Dum Spiro, Spero."

As long as I breath, I hope.

Cicero

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Old 10-08-2004, 04:09 AM
Mike Pearce
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

"Nancy Young" wrote in message ...
Naomi Darvell wrote:

I haven't been to Peter Luger's but I have been other restaurants where

they
appear to have poured butter onto the steak-- quite likely after

cooking.

Anyone is free to call me a liar, but for some reason I seem to
remember people calling that Philadelphia style or Pittsburgh style.
They'd do the same thing with hamburgers.


Well, I'm not going to call anyone a liar, but I thought that Pittsburgh
style was charred on the outside and still slightly cool in the center.

-Mike



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Old 10-08-2004, 04:09 AM
Mike Pearce
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Nancy Young" wrote in message ...
Naomi Darvell wrote:

I haven't been to Peter Luger's but I have been other restaurants where

they
appear to have poured butter onto the steak-- quite likely after

cooking.

Anyone is free to call me a liar, but for some reason I seem to
remember people calling that Philadelphia style or Pittsburgh style.
They'd do the same thing with hamburgers.


Well, I'm not going to call anyone a liar, but I thought that Pittsburgh
style was charred on the outside and still slightly cool in the center.

-Mike



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Old 10-08-2004, 05:03 AM
Christine Dabney
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

On Tue, 10 Aug 2004 02:07:45 -0000, Dog3 [email protected];not
wrote:



I just joined egullet the end of July. Thanks for the link. Have you ever
taken any of their classes?

Michael - needs all the help he can get


I have read them through, at least some of them, and I would say they
are excellent. I haven't actually done some of the things. But I
highly recommend the one on cookware.

They are set up so that anyone can take them at any time, and they are
totally free.

I have become totally addicted to egullet. Have you read the
foodblogs? They started last year, with people blogging for a week at
a time. Now, it has become a permanent feature. You can learn a lot
from those as well.

You can find them here (as well as the rules of the road). To find
the beginning of them scroll down to the bottom.

http://forums.egullet.com/index.php?showtopic=42329

Another long running thread, now going for over 2 years, is the one
about Dinner.

http://forums.egullet.com/index.php?showtopic=5867

Hope to see you around on eGullet!

Christine


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Old 10-08-2004, 10:45 PM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

at Tue, 10 Aug 2004 01:48:00 GMT in ,
(Wayne) wrote :

(alsilvers) wrote in
. com:

Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?

Al


I can't speak for Peter Luger's or The Palm, but I do know that Smith &
Wollensky's and Ruth's Chris both use butter. I was told by a server at
S&W that their finished steaks are dipped in a vat of melted butter, then
put back on the grill for a few seconds per side before plating. Ruth's
Chris brushes melted butter on the finished steaks before plating. I
suspect this is commonplace among many good steakhouses.


I'm not a big fan of buttered steaks. What need is there of any adornment
on an excellent steak? If the meat is good enough it speaks for itself.
Anything else is distracting. Indeed, I find adding butter makes the
experience greasy and unappealing. As you might imagine, I'm not fond of
Ruth's Chris as a result. The Metropolitan Grill here in Seattle (of like
caliber to the places mentioned - a cut above Ruth's Chris, for example,
more like in Luger territory) doesn't butter their steaks.

Ruth's Chris, as well as several other steakhouses, seems to believe "if it
moves, douse it in butter". At one steakhouse I won't mention, I received a
side of mushrooms that were literally swimming in a pool of butter. This is
excessive and heavy-handed IMHO. A similar attitude occurs at certain
Italian places, where everything comes swimming in olive oil.

Each steakhouse I've been to seems to have their own preparation style.
Some rub with pepper, others add butter, others herbs, others make it
plain. I'm a big fan of the plain school: just give me a great steak,
preferably individually hand-selected by the chef from the butcher, and I'm
happy.


--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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Old 10-08-2004, 10:45 PM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default

at Tue, 10 Aug 2004 01:48:00 GMT in ,
(Wayne) wrote :

(alsilvers) wrote in
. com:

Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?

Al


I can't speak for Peter Luger's or The Palm, but I do know that Smith &
Wollensky's and Ruth's Chris both use butter. I was told by a server at
S&W that their finished steaks are dipped in a vat of melted butter, then
put back on the grill for a few seconds per side before plating. Ruth's
Chris brushes melted butter on the finished steaks before plating. I
suspect this is commonplace among many good steakhouses.


I'm not a big fan of buttered steaks. What need is there of any adornment
on an excellent steak? If the meat is good enough it speaks for itself.
Anything else is distracting. Indeed, I find adding butter makes the
experience greasy and unappealing. As you might imagine, I'm not fond of
Ruth's Chris as a result. The Metropolitan Grill here in Seattle (of like
caliber to the places mentioned - a cut above Ruth's Chris, for example,
more like in Luger territory) doesn't butter their steaks.

Ruth's Chris, as well as several other steakhouses, seems to believe "if it
moves, douse it in butter". At one steakhouse I won't mention, I received a
side of mushrooms that were literally swimming in a pool of butter. This is
excessive and heavy-handed IMHO. A similar attitude occurs at certain
Italian places, where everything comes swimming in olive oil.

Each steakhouse I've been to seems to have their own preparation style.
Some rub with pepper, others add butter, others herbs, others make it
plain. I'm a big fan of the plain school: just give me a great steak,
preferably individually hand-selected by the chef from the butcher, and I'm
happy.


--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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Old 10-08-2004, 11:00 PM
Wayne
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?

(Alex Rast) wrote in
:

at Tue, 10 Aug 2004 01:48:00 GMT in
,
(Wayne) wrote
:

(alsilvers) wrote in
.com:

Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter
before broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule?
Or is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form
right to the oven?

Al


I can't speak for Peter Luger's or The Palm, but I do know that Smith
& Wollensky's and Ruth's Chris both use butter. I was told by a
server at S&W that their finished steaks are dipped in a vat of melted
butter, then put back on the grill for a few seconds per side before
plating. Ruth's Chris brushes melted butter on the finished steaks
before plating. I suspect this is commonplace among many good
steakhouses.


I'm not a big fan of buttered steaks. What need is there of any
adornment on an excellent steak? If the meat is good enough it speaks
for itself. Anything else is distracting. Indeed, I find adding butter
makes the experience greasy and unappealing. As you might imagine, I'm
not fond of Ruth's Chris as a result. The Metropolitan Grill here in
Seattle (of like caliber to the places mentioned - a cut above Ruth's
Chris, for example, more like in Luger territory) doesn't butter their
steaks.

Ruth's Chris, as well as several other steakhouses, seems to believe
"if it moves, douse it in butter". At one steakhouse I won't mention,
I received a side of mushrooms that were literally swimming in a pool
of butter. This is excessive and heavy-handed IMHO. A similar attitude
occurs at certain Italian places, where everything comes swimming in
olive oil.

Each steakhouse I've been to seems to have their own preparation
style. Some rub with pepper, others add butter, others herbs, others
make it plain. I'm a big fan of the plain school: just give me a great
steak, preferably individually hand-selected by the chef from the
butcher, and I'm happy.


I love butter and rarely do I consider it excessive no matter how good
the steak. I really like the steaks the way Smith & Wollensky does them,
dipped in butter and briefly re-grilled. I'm not as fond of any of the
steakhouses that simply melt pats of butter on the finished steak before
presentation.

I also love olive oil, but not in excess, so I'm with you on that one!

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 10-08-2004, 11:01 PM
Kswck
 
Posts: n/a
Default How are steaks prepared at the like of Peter Luger, Palm?


"alsilvers" wrote in message
om...
Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?


Haven't been to Peter Luger's in many years, but from what I remember of
them, I believe they coat the steak in oil first (to prevent sticking on the
the grill) and then grilling at a high temp on one grill and moving it to
another, lower temp grill to finish it up. The butter is added after the
steak comes off the heat, partly for flavor and partly for
presentation-makes it glisten.


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Old 10-08-2004, 11:01 PM
Kswck
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"alsilvers" wrote in message
om...
Do famous steak places like Peter Luger's, the
Palm, and others use marinades or tenderizers or BUTTER in
preparing there steaks, or do they simply take the raw meat straight
from the cow, age it, and stick it under the broiler?

I've always been somewhat curious if when you are ordering a steak,
whether any ingredients have been added during the preparation. For
example, I seem to recall reading that Peter Luger, in preparing the
meat before broiling, actually rubs its Porterhouse with butter before
broiling.

IS this true, and is this common, or perhaps even done as a rule? Or
is the meat normally just taken in pure, "unadulterated" form right to
the oven?


Haven't been to Peter Luger's in many years, but from what I remember of
them, I believe they coat the steak in oil first (to prevent sticking on the
the grill) and then grilling at a high temp on one grill and moving it to
another, lower temp grill to finish it up. The butter is added after the
steak comes off the heat, partly for flavor and partly for
presentation-makes it glisten.




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