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Default Best bit of action you've seen in a resto

After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
service.

Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.
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Kalmia wrote:
> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> service.
>
> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.


I was at a table near the front door & large plate glass windows of a
local Italian restaurant, i was in the middle of my soup iirc when a
'street person' an obviously, down on their luck, bedraggled, filthy,
unkempt, dirty person just walked in grabbed my untouched bread basket
and scurried out.

THe management were profuse in their apologies, produced another basket
of bread with alacrity. They seemed even more upset that the person did
not ask me if he could have my bread.

The chef came out and was particularly angry when i mentioned, in
response to some question of his, that the 'street person' didn't say a
word to me just grabbed the bread and ran.

I ate at that restaurant routinely, 4 - 5 nights a week after work and
often ate lunch there also. Very good food, unpretentious, well priced
and close to both my work and home.

When i was ready to pay the check i was told i would not be charged for
the meal or second drink that was served me with out my asking for it
and was again apologized to for the incident. And im not even a
particularly good tipper.

On subsequent visits i made it a point to sit further back inside the
restaurant and not quite so close to the front door
--

Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3

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Kalmia wrote:
> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> service.
>
> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.


Nice. Because who knows where that missing bit of glass went.

I probably have a ton of good restaurant experiences. Most are
uneventful because the waiters do everything right.

Just a few weeks ago we went out to dinner after a long day of
working on the house. I was just plain hungry and tired. More than
usual. Heh. I ordered some dinner and I forgot if I had a choice of
soup or salad. Turns out it was just soup. No big deal.

A minute later the bartender was back, here, I just made you a
salad. I thought that was really, really nice of him. I mean, if I
just HAD to have a salad, I could have ordered one a la carte.
I was really touched that he went out of his way like that.

nancy
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On Nov 8, 11:50 am, Kalmia > wrote:
> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> service. [snip]


I posted this in 1999:
"..., I remember putting up a date at the Parker House in
Boston as a callow youth (dates you, just to use that phrase). At
breakfast, the toast had its own covered silver dish. Just as you
thought
you wanted a bite of toast and realized you needed another piece the
waiter
materialized from nowhere, lifted the lid and served it to your bread
plate
with silver tongs. I recall being so impressed that I hoped such
suavity
would rub off on me in the eyes of my date.... " -aem
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aem wrote:

> I posted this in 1999:
> "..., I remember putting up a date at the Parker House in
> Boston as a callow youth (dates you, just to use that phrase). At
> breakfast, the toast had its own covered silver dish. Just as you
> thought
> you wanted a bite of toast and realized you needed another piece the
> waiter
> materialized from nowhere, lifted the lid and served it to your bread
> plate
> with silver tongs. I recall being so impressed that I hoped such
> suavity
> would rub off on me in the eyes of my date.... "


That's some fancy service! I've never had breakfast where
the toast was served on a covered dish, never mind having it
replenished by a tong wielding server. I picture white gloves.

I have trouble picturing you ever having been callow, however.

nancy


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On Nov 8, 3:11*pm, aem > wrote:
> On Nov 8, 11:50 am, Kalmia > wrote:
>
> > After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. *Maybe it's time to laud
> > something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> > service. *[snip]

>
> I posted this in 1999:
> "..., I remember putting up a date at the Parker House in
> Boston as a callow youth (dates you, just to use that phrase). *At
> breakfast, the toast had its own covered silver dish. *Just as you
> thought
> you wanted a bite of toast and realized you needed another piece the
> waiter
> materialized from nowhere, lifted the lid and served it to your bread
> plate
> with silver tongs. *I recall being so impressed that I hoped such
> suavity
> would rub off on me in the eyes of my date.... " * * *-aem


Parker House? Callow youth? A well-heeled one, at least.

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On Nov 8, 1:50*pm, Kalmia > wrote:
> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. *Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed.


Not something I personally witnessed, but my sister saw her boss
screwing one of the other waitresses on a dining table. You said,
"action."

--Bryan
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On Sun, 8 Nov 2009 15:06:27 -0500, "Nancy Young"
> wrote:


>I probably have a ton of good restaurant experiences. Most are
>uneventful because the waiters do everything right.


We have a tendency to only remember the bad and not the good. Same
thing with a messy house. One of us may take on a messy closet or
another project and wonder why the other didn't notice. But if either
of us makes a mess you know it's going to get brought up.

Lou


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On Nov 8, 12:17 pm, "Nancy Young" > wrote:
>
> That's some fancy service! I've never had breakfast where
> the toast was served on a covered dish, never mind having it
> replenished by a tong wielding server. I picture white gloves.
>
> I have trouble picturing you ever having been callow, however.
>

Imagine a college freshman in the big city of Boston having come from
an isolated town where my high school class numbered 22. "Callow"
doesn't begin to describe how unprepared I was. Some of what I
encountered was a great pleasure, though, such as the service at the
Parker House. -aem
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Kalmia wrote:
> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> service.
>
> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.



My uncle lived across the street from a very nice hotel in Toronto and
often ate there. One night he took his in-laws out for dinner and they
were all drinking Manhattans and a fly landed in his SiL's drink. He
called the wait over and pointed out the fly in the drink. The waiter
came back with a cloth over his arms and a paid or silver spoons with
which he deftly removed the fly from the drink.


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aem wrote:
> On Nov 8, 12:17 pm, "Nancy Young" > wrote:
>> That's some fancy service! I've never had breakfast where
>> the toast was served on a covered dish, never mind having it
>> replenished by a tong wielding server. I picture white gloves.
>>
>> I have trouble picturing you ever having been callow, however.
>>

> Imagine a college freshman in the big city of Boston having come from
> an isolated town where my high school class numbered 22. "Callow"
> doesn't begin to describe how unprepared I was. Some of what I
> encountered was a great pleasure, though, such as the service at the
> Parker House. -aem




Boston in the 60s was a fantastic college town with something for
everyone. Most of us didn't aspire to the Parker House, but
places like Durgin Park were so much fun.

gloria p
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"Kalmia" > wrote in message
...
> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> service.
>
> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.


Saw this article in the NY Times today and found it was appropriate to the
discussion. Lots of things on the list I'd like to teach to the wait staff
at the places I eat.

Part 1:
http://boss.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/1...r-do-part-one/

Part 2:
http://boss.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/1...ver-do-part-2/

Jon

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Dave Smith wrote:
:

>
>
> My uncle lived across the street from a very nice hotel in Toronto and
> often ate there. One night he took his in-laws out for dinner and they
> were all drinking Manhattans and a fly landed in his SiL's drink. He
> called the wait over and pointed out the fly in the drink. The waiter
> came back with a cloth over his arms and a paid or silver spoons with
> which he deftly removed the fly from the drink.




How classy! Euuuuuwwwwww!

gloria p
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"Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Kalmia wrote:
>> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
>> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
>> service.
>>
>> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
>> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
>> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
>> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
>> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
>> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
>> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.

>
> I was at a table near the front door & large plate glass windows of a
> local Italian restaurant, i was in the middle of my soup iirc when a
> 'street person' an obviously, down on their luck, bedraggled, filthy,
> unkempt, dirty person just walked in grabbed my untouched bread basket and
> scurried out.
>
> THe management were profuse in their apologies, produced another basket of
> bread with alacrity. They seemed even more upset that the person did not
> ask me if he could have my bread.
>
> The chef came out and was particularly angry when i mentioned, in response
> to some question of his, that the 'street person' didn't say a word to me
> just grabbed the bread and ran.
>
> I ate at that restaurant routinely, 4 - 5 nights a week after work and
> often ate lunch there also. Very good food, unpretentious, well priced
> and close to both my work and home.
>
> When i was ready to pay the check i was told i would not be charged for
> the meal or second drink that was served me with out my asking for it and
> was again apologized to for the incident. And im not even a particularly
> good tipper.
>
> On subsequent visits i made it a point to sit further back inside the
> restaurant and not quite so close to the front door
> --
>
> Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.
>
> Domine, dirige nos.
> Let the games begin!
> http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3
>



same thing happened to me, though the owner of the restaurant brought out a
brown bagged lunch for the offending homeless man. i now call it one of my
favorites restaurants.

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"skeeter" > wrote in news:4af96778$0$7445
:

>> Kalmia wrote:
>>> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
>>> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
>>> service.



When I was a dishwasher at the famous French restaurant in my youth, I
watched one waiter in his tuxedo walk some cleared plates into the kitchen
and grab an uneaten portion of rack of lamb in his bare hands and bite off
a huge mouthful before dumping the plates in the bin for me to clean. It
totally grossed me out. I don't remember if he washed his hands. Never saw
anything like it before or since.

Andy


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On Nov 9, 3:37*pm, "gloria.p" > wrote:
> Dave Smith wrote:
>
> :
>
>
>
> > My uncle lived across the street from a very nice hotel in Toronto and
> > often ate there. One night he took his in-laws *out for dinner and they
> > were all drinking Manhattans and a fly landed in his SiL's drink. He
> > called the wait over and pointed out the fly in the drink. The waiter
> > came back with a cloth over his arms and a paid or silver spoons with
> > which he deftly removed the fly from the drink.

>
> How classy! * Euuuuuwwwwww!
>
> gloria p


Obvious comment not made: I believe it's doing the backstroke, Madam.

maxine in ri
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On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 08:15:53 -0500, "skeeter" >
wrote:

>> I ate at that restaurant routinely, 4 - 5 nights a week after work and
>> often ate lunch there also. Very good food, unpretentious, well priced
>> and close to both my work and home.
>>
>> When i was ready to pay the check i was told i would not be charged for
>> the meal or second drink that was served me with out my asking for it and
>> was again apologized to for the incident. And im not even a particularly
>> good tipper.
>>
>> On subsequent visits i made it a point to sit further back inside the
>> restaurant and not quite so close to the front door
>> --
>>
>> Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.
>>
>> Domine, dirige nos.
>> Let the games begin!
>> http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3
>>

>
>
>same thing happened to me, though the owner of the restaurant brought out a
>brown bagged lunch for the offending homeless man. i now call it one of my
>favorites restaurants.


It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you going
to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?

Lou
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Lou Decruss wrote:
> On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 08:15:53 -0500, "skeeter" >
> wrote:
>
>
>>>I ate at that restaurant routinely, 4 - 5 nights a week after work and
>>>often ate lunch there also. Very good food, unpretentious, well priced
>>>and close to both my work and home.
>>>
>>>When i was ready to pay the check i was told i would not be charged for
>>>the meal or second drink that was served me with out my asking for it and
>>>was again apologized to for the incident. And im not even a particularly
>>>good tipper.
>>>
>>>On subsequent visits i made it a point to sit further back inside the
>>>restaurant and not quite so close to the front door
>>>--
>>>
>>>Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

>>
>>
>>same thing happened to me, though the owner of the restaurant brought out a
>>brown bagged lunch for the offending homeless man. i now call it one of my
>>favorites restaurants.

>
>
> It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you going
> to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?
>
> Lou


In my case the chef seemed most upset about the "street person" not
asking me if he could have my bread but just taking it, in effect
"defrauding an innkeeper" which, form what i understand is a curious
point of honor among chefs and an equally curious aspect of English
common law.

Somehow stealing food from an "innkeeper" or restaurant is morally &
legally worse than stealing food from a market.

I don't recall the philosophical premise that justifies it, only that it
is an archaism still much favored by restaurateurs.

--

Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3

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Lou Decruss wrote:

> On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 08:15:53 -0500, "skeeter" >
> wrote:
>
>>> I ate at that restaurant routinely, 4 - 5 nights a week after work
>>> and often ate lunch there also. Very good food, unpretentious,
>>> well priced and close to both my work and home.
>>>
>>> When i was ready to pay the check i was told i would not be charged
>>> for the meal or second drink that was served me with out my asking
>>> for it and was again apologized to for the incident. And im not
>>> even a particularly good tipper.
>>>
>>> On subsequent visits i made it a point to sit further back inside
>>> the restaurant and not quite so close to the front door
>>> --
>>>
>>> Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.
>>>
>>> Domine, dirige nos.
>>> Let the games begin!
>>> http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3
>>>

>>
>>
>> same thing happened to me, though the owner of the restaurant
>> brought out a brown bagged lunch for the offending homeless man. i
>> now call it one of my favorites restaurants.

>
> It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you going
> to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?
>



One of the "issues" we have when we have cookouts at our corner bar are
homeless types wanting food. A coupla of them are real obnoxious, they'll
barge right in or whine and beg when we are manning the grills. A coupla
others are very discreet, they hang back and approach us very timidly and
ask politely...they get some nice food, the loudmouthed ****s do not..

Natcherly the "freeloaders" are not just black homeless peeps, there are the
affluent white cheapskates who will come in and chow down big and only order
one beer and tip the barkeep a quarter. They'll hawg all the primo stuff
like shrimp and steak and one even brings Tupperware containers for
leftovers (this stopped when I conveniently "misplaced" the containers when
she wasn't looking, hehe). Some will sit for a coupla hours and eat enuf
for like FIVE people, etc. I mean come ON, you are getting a GREAT meal for
free here...

So I kinda keep an "eye" on things, cheapskate deadbeat losers will ruin
EVERYTHING if you let 'em...

I am a *lot* less kindly disposed towards the affluent cheapskates than I am
towards the homeless...

One in particular is a Big Cheese type, always flashing a roll of hundreds.
He'll say, "I'd buy you a drink or put some songs on the jukebox, but all I
have are hundreds...", to which I'm thinking, "Hey, they have enuf money
here to MAKE CHANGE...and if not there's a currency exchange and several
grocery stores with in-house banks just down the block...". Maybe it's
Confederate money or something, who knows...

OTOH there are those of fairly modest income who are buying the cooks
drinks, tipping big, etc. I'll say, please, it's not necessary to buy me
drinks, but they insist. Money is certainly indicator of class...

Anyways, the vagaries of "urban living", lol...


--
Best
Greg


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On 2009-11-10, Gregory Morrow > wrote:

> others are very discreet, they hang back and approach us very timidly and
> ask politely...they get some nice food, the loudmouthed ****s do not..


I'd handle it the same way.

> So I kinda keep an "eye" on things, cheapskate deadbeat losers will ruin
> EVERYTHING if you let 'em...


I wonder if a chit system would work. Customers can pay $2 for the grub
or get a chit from you.



--
brothermouse
http://www.mousetrap.net/mouse/
Coleman gear, *nix, scanners, homebrewing


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frater mus wrote:

> On 2009-11-10, Gregory Morrow > wrote:
>
>> others are very discreet, they hang back and approach us very
>> timidly and ask politely...they get some nice food, the loudmouthed
>> ****s do not..

>
> I'd handle it the same way.



There are peeps I do feel sorry for, mainly the women. Aggressive male
panhandlers - and there are a coupla female ones too - deserve *nothing*.
Some of the aggressive ones hang out at the Starbucks across the way, I've
overhead them bragging about the money they make, it is not an
inconsiderable amount in some cases. On a nice busy day, say when there's a
Cubs game (we are by Wrigley Field here in Chicawgo) they can clear a
hundred bux, EASY. Use the money you MOOCH from others to BUY some food,
don't be mooching from those of us that work and put our own time and money
and effort into putting these do's on..
..

>> So I kinda keep an "eye" on things, cheapskate deadbeat losers will
>> ruin EVERYTHING if you let 'em...

>
> I wonder if a chit system would work. Customers can pay $2 for the
> grub or get a chit from you.



The place does not have a license to sell food, so that's out. And the
whole point anyways is not to charge for the food...basically we tell people
that they are welcome to the grub if they buy a drink or two. We've
attracted some nice new customers that way...

This summer some mentally-deranged woman with a horrible stinky dog came up
when we were grilling and started demanding a cheeseburger for her dog,
"I'll pay for it!", she said. We explained that we cannot sell food, that
we are not a "dog restaurant", etc. She finally got the message..."some
people", lol. I did feel very sorry for the pooch, though, it was obviously
not having a very good life...


--
Best
Greg


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In article
>,
Kalmia > wrote:

> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
> service.
>
> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.


Many years ago, my mom, dad, sister, and I were waiting to be seated for
dinner in the small waiting area of a popular restaurant in our area. It
was a Saturday night and the restaurant was packed. The name of the
restaurant was the Gingham House. As you might expect, the entire
restaurant was decorated in tiny squares (red and white). The walls,
ceiling, and all the furniture were the same red and white squares. Each
square was maybe half an inch thick.

When we were just about ready to be seated a young waitress ran past my
parents and me screaming that she couldn't stand the crazy decor and the
crowds any more. She ran out of the restaurant in tears with her arms
flailing above her head. I thought the restaurant's decor was crazy too,
but it didn't bother me or anyone else in our neighborhood to that
extent. That restaurant was eventually sold, the decor changed, and it
is now a Brazilian steakhouse.

Then there was the time when a five college friends and I dined at
another restaurant. One vegetarian friend ordered spaghetti with
marinara sauce. The poor waitress dropped the entire platter of
spaghetti on my friend's head when it slid off the serving tray. The
wearer of that spaghetti was a woman who was dressed only in jeans and a
t-shirt, so no fancy clothes were stained. She was very good humored
about the accident. The entire meal for the six of us was comped. We
left the waitress a good tip because we felt so bad for her. That
restaurant is still in business and I have been back there several times
since that incident.

Then there was the time where some other college friends and I went to
yet another restaurant after we spent several hours one Saturday in the
campus library studying for final exams. We went to a casual seafood
place near campus for dinner. I don't eat seafood much so I ordered a
hot roast beef sandwich. The waitress, who was old enough to be George
Washington's grandmother, served everyone their dinner except me. When I
asked where my food was, she said they were out of roast beef, then she
scampered away before I could say anything else. The restaurant was
cavernous and I didn't see her or any other waitress in our section
until after my friends had all finished eating. Then the waitress
finally returned and asked if I would like anything else? I said I
would, but it will be from somewhere else. She did not get a tip from
me. I also never returned to that restaurant and it has since been
replaced by a hospital.
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Gregory Morrow wrote:

> There are peeps I do feel sorry for, mainly the women. Aggressive
> male panhandlers - and there are a coupla female ones too - deserve
> *nothing*. Some of the aggressive ones hang out at the Starbucks
> across the way, I've overhead them bragging about the money they
> make, it is not an inconsiderable amount in some cases. On a nice
> busy day, say when there's a Cubs game (we are by Wrigley Field here
> in Chicawgo) they can clear a hundred bux, EASY. Use the money you
> MOOCH from others to BUY some food, don't be mooching from those of
> us that work and put our own time and money and effort into putting
> these do's on.. .


I was taken aback by the panhandling in Chicago. I've never crossed
the street in NYC to avoid being accosted for money. I don't know
what's up with that. On the way out of town, they were working the
train. It was more than annoying, you felt like you'd better fork over
a couple bucks.

Loved the art museum! Heh.

nancy
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On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 13:50:45 -0800, "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq."
> wrote:

>
>
>Lou Decruss wrote:


>> It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you going
>> to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?
>>
>> Lou

>
>In my case the chef seemed most upset about the "street person" not
>asking me if he could have my bread but just taking it, in effect
>"defrauding an innkeeper" which, form what i understand is a curious
>point of honor among chefs and an equally curious aspect of English
>common law.
>
>Somehow stealing food from an "innkeeper" or restaurant is morally &
>legally worse than stealing food from a market.
>
>I don't recall the philosophical premise that justifies it, only that it
>is an archaism still much favored by restaurateurs.


Very interesting. I have read about and seen in movies people being
jailed for stealing food in the past. I'm far from a "bleeding Heart"
but a hungry person can touch my feelings. When I was in my
mid-twenties I was all messed up on cocaine. There were a few times I
went on a bender and spent every penny I had, and came down to
ravishing hunger after not eating for days. Without going into more
details I can say being hungry without a means to eat really SUCKS!

Luckily for me coke isn't part of my life anymore but I still think
about it once in a "long" while. And my pantry and fridge are always
full.

Grateful Lou
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Bob Muncie wrote:
> Kalmia wrote:
>> After the resto - bashing, I feel guilty. Maybe it's time to laud
>> something unusual you have witnessed, some bit of beyond the call
>> service.
>>
>> Mine: ordered an after dinner White Cloud, and about a minute after it
>> was served, I noticed a chip in the glass. Summoned waiter and began
>> to point it out, and with an unhesitating flourish and not a word of
>> argument, he whipped that thing off the table and tossed the liquid
>> into a tiny, nearby sink, dropped the offending glass into the trash,
>> and rushed to the bar for a new White Cloud. He removed all doubt that
>> the same drink would be unceremoniously tossed into a new glass.

>
> You make a good point. It seems all we do is point out lousy service at
> the restaurants we visit.
>
> Just today, went to meet someone for lunch, and my server was a very
> nice person. Even offered to call the other restaurant (same name,
> different city where the person I was to meet went) to verify he was there.
>
> Just an average type restaurant, but the server was a sweetheart. I only
> had an ice tea before leaving, but I left her a nice tip. Had I stayed
> for lunch, I am certain I would have left an even nicer tip. She
> reminded me of an Aunt type person you actually enjoy visiting.
>
> Bob


Nice! Too bad you got stood up!

Rob


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Nancy Young wrote:

> Gregory Morrow wrote:
>
>> There are peeps I do feel sorry for, mainly the women. Aggressive
>> male panhandlers - and there are a coupla female ones too - deserve
>> *nothing*. Some of the aggressive ones hang out at the Starbucks
>> across the way, I've overhead them bragging about the money they
>> make, it is not an inconsiderable amount in some cases. On a nice
>> busy day, say when there's a Cubs game (we are by Wrigley Field here
>> in Chicawgo) they can clear a hundred bux, EASY. Use the money you
>> MOOCH from others to BUY some food, don't be mooching from those of
>> us that work and put our own time and money and effort into putting
>> these do's on.. .

>
> I was taken aback by the panhandling in Chicago. I've never crossed
> the street in NYC to avoid being accosted for money. I don't know
> what's up with that. On the way out of town, they were working the
> train. It was more than annoying, you felt like you'd better fork
> over a couple bucks.
>
> Loved the art museum! Heh.



Yup, the shysters *really* work the downtown/Michigan Avenue tourist/visitor
area...

And yes, the Art Institute is a treasure, they recently opened a new
"modern" wing, it's very impressive...


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On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 16:25:03 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
> wrote:

>Lou Decruss wrote:


>> It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you going
>> to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?
>>

>
>
>One of the "issues" we have when we have cookouts at our corner bar are
>homeless types wanting food. A coupla of them are real obnoxious, they'll
>barge right in or whine and beg when we are manning the grills. A coupla
>others are very discreet, they hang back and approach us very timidly and
>ask politely...they get some nice food, the loudmouthed ****s do not..


The loudmouths probably have a fridge at home packed with food
purchased with food stamps. It's called "I deserves dis cuz my graet
granmy was a slave" They couldn't pass a first grade flash card test
much less know who their father was, but they think they are "owed" a
meal at a private party. Get used to this mentality Greg. The nutjobs
at the controls in Washington like their votes.

Did you know that if you qualify for food stamps or other government
programs you can also get a free cell phone? Approval by email takes
just a few hours and the phone is in your mailbox in 2 days. It's
only good for 68 minutes a month but I'm sure a crack-whore doesn't
talk much.

https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enr...blic/Home.aspx

>Natcherly the "freeloaders" are not just black homeless peeps, there are the
>affluent white cheapskates who will come in and chow down big and only order
>one beer and tip the barkeep a quarter.


Scum-baggery is not limited to a certain color, race, or ethnic
background. But stereotypes have developed for a reason. They're
usually true.

> Money is certainly indicator of class...


It's not the money. (IMO) It's how it's handled. I know some cheap
prick who owned a company and treated his employees not so good. When
they were at lunch he would always go to the shithouse so he wasn't
there when the check arrived. He made people uncomfortable when they
had to ask him for his portion. He would always "forget" something at
the table when the group left and go back to the table and collect
whatever tips the other members had left and slide a buck under his
coffee cup so the server would think he was the "big tipper."

He got older and sold the business on a contract for $275,000 and a
percentage for 5 years. The new guy filed bankruptcy and stiffed the
cheap old prick for 264K. What goes around comes around.

Lou

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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 07:00:44 -0500, "Nancy Young"
> wrote:

>Gregory Morrow wrote:
>
>> There are peeps I do feel sorry for, mainly the women. Aggressive
>> male panhandlers - and there are a coupla female ones too - deserve
>> *nothing*. Some of the aggressive ones hang out at the Starbucks
>> across the way, I've overhead them bragging about the money they
>> make, it is not an inconsiderable amount in some cases. On a nice
>> busy day, say when there's a Cubs game (we are by Wrigley Field here
>> in Chicawgo) they can clear a hundred bux, EASY. Use the money you
>> MOOCH from others to BUY some food, don't be mooching from those of
>> us that work and put our own time and money and effort into putting
>> these do's on.. .

>
>I was taken aback by the panhandling in Chicago. I've never crossed
>the street in NYC to avoid being accosted for money. I don't know
>what's up with that. On the way out of town, they were working the
>train. It was more than annoying, you felt like you'd better fork over
>a couple bucks.


Yabut Chicago turns out the best posters. I mean you got Greg, Doug
and me. What else do you need?

Lou
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Andy wrote:

> When I was a dishwasher at the famous French restaurant in my youth, I
> watched one waiter in his tuxedo walk some cleared plates into the kitchen
> and grab an uneaten portion of rack of lamb in his bare hands and bite off
> a huge mouthful before dumping the plates in the bin for me to clean. It
> totally grossed me out. I don't remember if he washed his hands. Never saw
> anything like it before or since.


What part was gross? Eating from the "busboy buffet", or not washing
his hands before doing so? The existential distance between wearing a
dinner jacket and eating someone else's scraps?

I don't find either one particularly disturbing unless I am missing
something here.

--
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composed offline and synced later.
http://www.mousetrap.net/mouse/offline.html
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Lou Decruss wrote:
> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 07:00:44 -0500, "Nancy Young"
> > wrote:


>> I was taken aback by the panhandling in Chicago. I've never crossed
>> the street in NYC to avoid being accosted for money. I don't know
>> what's up with that. On the way out of town, they were working the
>> train. It was more than annoying, you felt like you'd better fork
>> over a couple bucks.

>
> Yabut Chicago turns out the best posters. I mean you got Greg, Doug
> and me. What else do you need?


Nuttin, honey.

nancy


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Lou Decruss wrote:

> I'm far from a "bleeding Heart"
> but a hungry person can touch my feelings.


Same here, but upon closer inspection I think I have a different
reaction to:

* hungry for reasons beyond one's control
* hungry due to decisions one has made during this calendar day.

Example: if I give someone $3 for a sandwich and they buy a 40 with it
in front of me instead of food, I am unlikely to provide them with
additional funding due to their hunger.

An anecdote related to hunger and charity:
I worked at a decent bakery attached to a restaurant and there were
certain kinds of breads and pastries we couldn't keep and or
cost-effectively recycle into other foodstuffs: breads with nuts or
whole grains, filled croissants (peach, apricot, cream cheese,
chocolate). Anything that couldn't be rolled over into croutons or
bread pudding the next day. Decent food, good stuff, good ingredients
used well.

Since we were tossing them in the dumpster every night got permission to
offer the leftovers it to the local homeless shelter (the company made
me track every item for tax purposes) but they said they didn't have
anyone to get it. So I started taking it by every night after work.

The complaints from the homeless started immediately --
"where's the meat?"
"how come you only bring us bread?"
"I don't like this crap. What the hell is this stuff?"
etc

After a while got tired of schlepping it on my own time and own dime and
getting harrassed for it. I don't need thanks but please spare me the
heckling. After a while I thought: tell ya what, fellas. Fsck you,
get your own fscking food.

Hell, I was a poor grad student eating the same stuff at night and knew
I was lucky to get it. My girlfriend and I basically lived off our
bread allotment and leftovers from that place.

> Luckily for me coke isn't part of my life anymore but I still think
> about it once in a "long" while. And my pantry and fridge are always
> full.


Glad to hear you survived it. Several from my high school class didn't
make the trip back...

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Lou Decruss wrote:

> On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 16:25:03 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
> > wrote:
>
>> Lou Decruss wrote:

>
>>> It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you
>>> going to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?
>>>

>>
>>
>> One of the "issues" we have when we have cookouts at our corner bar
>> are homeless types wanting food. A coupla of them are real
>> obnoxious, they'll barge right in or whine and beg when we are
>> manning the grills. A coupla others are very discreet, they hang
>> back and approach us very timidly and ask politely...they get some
>> nice food, the loudmouthed ****s do not..

>
> The loudmouths probably have a fridge at home packed with food
> purchased with food stamps. It's called "I deserves dis cuz my graet
> granmy was a slave" They couldn't pass a first grade flash card test
> much less know who their father was, but they think they are "owed" a
> meal at a private party. Get used to this mentality Greg. The nutjobs
> at the controls in Washington like their votes.



Yup...

And some of the mooches are wealthy and white and live in nice Lake Shore
Drive digs, too. There is one who always brings Tupperware containers and
immediately starts loading up on the food "for her father" - except that
dear old dad died already a coupla years ago and when he was still kicking
he was on a liquid diet. He was a rich old coot and that's why the daughter
unit at the age of 55 has never had to work a real job in her life...


> Did you know that if you qualify for food stamps or other government
> programs you can also get a free cell phone? Approval by email takes
> just a few hours and the phone is in your mailbox in 2 days. It's
> only good for 68 minutes a month but I'm sure a crack-whore doesn't
> talk much.
>
> https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enr...blic/Home.aspx
>



Wow, I need a cellphone, how do I qualify...!!!???

Reminds me of the prison inmates who got "priority" for the swine flu virus
while some health care professionals had to wait for their doses...



>> Natcherly the "freeloaders" are not just black homeless peeps, there
>> are the affluent white cheapskates who will come in and chow down
>> big and only order one beer and tip the barkeep a quarter.

>
> Scum-baggery is not limited to a certain color, race, or ethnic
> background. But stereotypes have developed for a reason. They're
> usually true.
>
>> Money is certainly indicator of class...

>
> It's not the money. (IMO) It's how it's handled. I know some cheap
> prick who owned a company and treated his employees not so good. When
> they were at lunch he would always go to the shithouse so he wasn't
> there when the check arrived. He made people uncomfortable when they
> had to ask him for his portion. He would always "forget" something at
> the table when the group left and go back to the table and collect
> whatever tips the other members had left and slide a buck under his
> coffee cup so the server would think he was the "big tipper."
>
> He got older and sold the business on a contract for $275,000 and a
> percentage for 5 years. The new guy filed bankruptcy and stiffed the
> cheap old prick for 264K. What goes around comes around.
>



It's true, and it's great fun to see it happen...

:-)


--
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Greg


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Lou Decruss wrote:

> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 07:00:44 -0500, "Nancy Young"
> > wrote:
>
>> Gregory Morrow wrote:
>>
>>> There are peeps I do feel sorry for, mainly the women. Aggressive
>>> male panhandlers - and there are a coupla female ones too - deserve
>>> *nothing*. Some of the aggressive ones hang out at the Starbucks
>>> across the way, I've overhead them bragging about the money they
>>> make, it is not an inconsiderable amount in some cases. On a nice
>>> busy day, say when there's a Cubs game (we are by Wrigley Field here
>>> in Chicawgo) they can clear a hundred bux, EASY. Use the money you
>>> MOOCH from others to BUY some food, don't be mooching from those of
>>> us that work and put our own time and money and effort into putting
>>> these do's on.. .

>>
>> I was taken aback by the panhandling in Chicago. I've never crossed
>> the street in NYC to avoid being accosted for money. I don't know
>> what's up with that. On the way out of town, they were working the
>> train. It was more than annoying, you felt like you'd better fork
>> over a couple bucks.

>
> Yabut Chicago turns out the best posters. I mean you got Greg, Doug
> and me. What else do you need?



****en' __A__, Lou...!!!

<chuckle>


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Nancy Young wrote:

> Lou Decruss wrote:
>> On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 07:00:44 -0500, "Nancy Young"
>> > wrote:

>
>>> I was taken aback by the panhandling in Chicago. I've never crossed
>>> the street in NYC to avoid being accosted for money. I don't know
>>> what's up with that. On the way out of town, they were working the
>>> train. It was more than annoying, you felt like you'd better fork
>>> over a couple bucks.

>>
>> Yabut Chicago turns out the best posters. I mean you got Greg, Doug
>> and me. What else do you need?

>
> Nuttin, honey.



:-)


--
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 12:49:18 -0800, "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq."
> wrote:

>
>
>Lou Decruss wrote:
>> On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 13:50:45 -0800, "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq."
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>
>>>Lou Decruss wrote:

>>
>>
>>>>It's hard to say no to someone who is hungry. But what are you going
>>>>to do if there's a hundred of them looking for that brown bag?
>>>>
>>>>Lou
>>>
>>>In my case the chef seemed most upset about the "street person" not
>>>asking me if he could have my bread but just taking it, in effect
>>>"defrauding an innkeeper" which, form what i understand is a curious
>>>point of honor among chefs and an equally curious aspect of English
>>>common law.
>>>
>>>Somehow stealing food from an "innkeeper" or restaurant is morally & legally worse than stealing food from a market.
>>>
>>>I don't recall the philosophical premise that justifies it, only that it
>>>is an archaism still much favored by restaurateurs.

>>
>>
>> Very interesting. I have read about and seen in movies people being
>> jailed for stealing food in the past.

>
>Are you familiar with the adage "might as well be hung for a sheep as a
>lamb?"


Never heard it.
>
>As late as the mid 1800's (at least in England) one could be executed
>for stealing food, so .....


Ouch!

>> I'm far from a "bleeding Heart"
>> but a hungry person can touch my feelings.

>
>Ditto, if he had asked i would have gladly given him the bread i had no
>intention of eating, but he did not give me a chance to do so, he just
>grabbed the bread basket and ran.
>
>However, if i did not stress, enough, how filthy he was, i suppose that
>filth he was covered in probly kept him out of all the free food places
>in the neighborhood.


>There's at lest 3 Protestant and one Catholic dinning rooms in the area
>that provide meals and cloths, shelter, showers, etc. But some people
>are for whatever reason incapable of accessing them.


Homeless people make others uncomfortable. Desperation makes people
do unpredictable things and the filth you describe is a state most try
to avoid being around. There was an old schizophrenic who wandered
the streets in my neighborhood for over 60 years. He developed the
disease in his very early 20's and wandered until he was finally taken
in by a brother when he was in his mid 80's. He wasn't actually
homeless as someone took his social security check and gave him a bed
in a basement and was supposed to feed him. He deserved a better life
and it was available but he refused it. Although most people were
afraid of him a few souls understood him enough to see he would never
be happy in a controlled environment and needed to live life as he
was. He's been gone for close to a year now but when I see someone
sleeping on a bench I look to see if it's him.

So I've seen what you've worded "whatever reason incapable of
accessing" first hand. I could fill pages with stories about him but
I'll just say the neighborhood isn't the same without him.

>> I was in my
>> mid-twenties I was all messed up on cocaine. There were a few times I
>> went on a bender and spent every penny I had, and came down to
>> ravishing hunger after not eating for days. Without going into more
>> details I can say being hungry without a means to eat really SUCKS!
>>
>> Luckily for me coke isn't part of my life anymore but I still think
>> about it once in a "long" while. And my pantry and fridge are always
>> full.
>>
>> Grateful Lou

>
>I knew a person once, who was amazed that i would prefer to feed myself,
>pay rent and bills and purchase necessities before spending my money on
>"yerba buenna."
>
>But that's the addiction syndrome, can happen with just about anything
>and is not limited to 'drugs.'


To get back to the group topic- eating disorders are the strangest
syndrome I've encountered. The need to control and warped view of
what and how to do it are quite bizarre. I had a very short fling
with a bulimic chick many years ago. We had a disagreement and she
said I was making her want to eat. I told her to stuff herself if she
wanted to. So she did and then went and horked it up and came back
and blamed me. That was the end of that little fling! I've run
across a few other nutjobs including one who peed on test strips to
see if she was in ketosis. I don't know much about all that no-carb
stuff but that was pretty weird especially since she saved the used
strips.
>
>I know of a person who impoverished them self with shoes. Fancy
>designer shoes, she must have had a thousand pairs and eventually had to
>declare bankruptcy.


Pretty sad. I like nice things but I'd prefer to eat before having
them.

Lou


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On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 18:47:12 +0000, frater mus
> wrote:

>Lou Decruss wrote:
>
>> I'm far from a "bleeding Heart"
>> but a hungry person can touch my feelings.

>
>Same here, but upon closer inspection I think I have a different
>reaction to:
>
>* hungry for reasons beyond one's control
>* hungry due to decisions one has made during this calendar day.
>
>Example: if I give someone $3 for a sandwich and they buy a 40 with it
>in front of me instead of food, I am unlikely to provide them with
>additional funding due to their hunger.


I worked with a guy who borrowed five bucks for lunch. The next day
he was telling stories about the fun he had the night before at his
local pub but he didn't have money to pay me back. I don't think I
ever got it back and I learned it was a common thing for him to do. A
few years later he spent a weekend at some Beatles revival fest. He
came to work in a tee-shirt he claimed cost him 50 bucks and was
yappin about all the other memorabilia he'd purchased. Of course at
lunchtime he was asking everyone for lunch money. Every told him no
as we all new his act buy then. Most of us packed our own lunches so
he started asking if anyone had an extra sandwich. I told him to eat
his tee-shirt.
>
>An anecdote related to hunger and charity:
>I worked at a decent bakery attached to a restaurant and there were
>certain kinds of breads and pastries we couldn't keep and or
>cost-effectively recycle into other foodstuffs: breads with nuts or
>whole grains, filled croissants (peach, apricot, cream cheese,
>chocolate). Anything that couldn't be rolled over into croutons or
>bread pudding the next day. Decent food, good stuff, good ingredients
>used well.
>
>Since we were tossing them in the dumpster every night got permission to
> offer the leftovers it to the local homeless shelter (the company made
>me track every item for tax purposes) but they said they didn't have
>anyone to get it. So I started taking it by every night after work.
>
>The complaints from the homeless started immediately --
>"where's the meat?"
>"how come you only bring us bread?"
>"I don't like this crap. What the hell is this stuff?"
>etc
>
>After a while got tired of schlepping it on my own time and own dime and
>getting harrassed for it. I don't need thanks but please spare me the
>heckling. After a while I thought: tell ya what, fellas. Fsck you,
>get your own fscking food.
>
>Hell, I was a poor grad student eating the same stuff at night and knew
>I was lucky to get it. My girlfriend and I basically lived off our
>bread allotment and leftovers from that place.


Thanks for sharing the anecdote. Some people make me sick. At least
you tried to help.

>> Luckily for me coke isn't part of my life anymore but I still think
>> about it once in a "long" while. And my pantry and fridge are always
>> full.

>
>Glad to hear you survived it. Several from my high school class didn't
>make the trip back...


One of the group went on to a wonderful career. He had a beautiful
house and a kick-ass car. His wife was absolutely gorgeous. By the
time he was 45 he was unemployed, alone and homeless. Coke isn't very
good to those who love it.

Lou

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Lou Decruss wrote:

[...]


> To get back to the group topic- eating disorders are the strangest
> syndrome I've encountered. The need to control and warped view of
> what and how to do it are quite bizarre. I had a very short fling
> with a bulimic chick many years ago. We had a disagreement and she
> said I was making her want to eat. I told her to stuff herself if she
> wanted to. So she did and then went and horked it up and came back
> and blamed me. That was the end of that little fling! I've run
> across a few other nutjobs including one who peed on test strips to
> see if she was in ketosis. I don't know much about all that no-carb
> stuff but that was pretty weird especially since she saved the used
> strips.



Remember "Mothra" Hughes who used to post here, she went through a number of
eating disorders, e.g she was bulimic for years, then she blew up and was
posting to alt.support.diet, etc. Food and later exercise were always a
"drama" for her, but then she was immature and unstable so it was no big
surprise, lol...

Eating disorders are a big turn-off, makes my "nut alarm" go
ding-ding-ding...chronic eating disorders are a sign of a very deep
psychological malaise.


--
Best
Greg
..


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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 03:07:29 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
> wrote:

>Lou Decruss wrote:
>> Did you know that if you qualify for food stamps or other government
>> programs you can also get a free cell phone? Approval by email takes
>> just a few hours and the phone is in your mailbox in 2 days. It's
>> only good for 68 minutes a month but I'm sure a crack-whore doesn't
>> talk much.
>>
>> https://www.safelinkwireless.com/Enr...blic/Home.aspx


>Wow, I need a cellphone, how do I qualify...!!!???


I don't know all the details but I do know if the state has approved
you for the link card the phone is a given. all you have to do is
ask.

>Reminds me of the prison inmates who got "priority" for the swine flu virus
>while some health care professionals had to wait for their doses...


That whole thing makes me sick.

Lou
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 23:25:49 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
> wrote:

>Lou Decruss wrote:
>
>[...]
>
>
>> To get back to the group topic- eating disorders are the strangest
>> syndrome I've encountered. The need to control and warped view of
>> what and how to do it are quite bizarre. I had a very short fling
>> with a bulimic chick many years ago. We had a disagreement and she
>> said I was making her want to eat. I told her to stuff herself if she
>> wanted to. So she did and then went and horked it up and came back
>> and blamed me. That was the end of that little fling! I've run
>> across a few other nutjobs including one who peed on test strips to
>> see if she was in ketosis. I don't know much about all that no-carb
>> stuff but that was pretty weird especially since she saved the used
>> strips.

>
>
>Remember "Mothra" Hughes who used to post here, she went through a number of
>eating disorders, e.g she was bulimic for years, then she blew up and was
>posting to alt.support.diet, etc. Food and later exercise were always a
>"drama" for her, but then she was immature and unstable so it was no big
>surprise, lol...


Yes, she was a piece of work but some people here liked her. We all
have different opinions of posters. Sometimes it shocks me when folks
talk to andy like he was even close to a normal person. But then
again a few people here can't stand me either so I guess it doesn't
matter much.

>Eating disorders are a big turn-off, makes my "nut alarm" go
>ding-ding-ding...chronic eating disorders are a sign of a very deep
>psychological malaise.


I don't think I'll ever be in a dating situation again but if I was
I'd run from anyone who had ever struggled with it even years ago.
The one I mentioned who used the **** strips had mentioned counseling
in college but she claimed she was past it. Other than a strict
low-carb diet I saw no signs of a problem. I didn't know anything
about the strips until she was gone. I lived with a total stranger
for three years. She left me with a broken heart and an empty wallet.
The break-up story is so bizarre Louise was even skeptical of what I'd
told her. After several years Louise hunted her down and met with
her. There was an item left behind that needed to be returned and
that was the excuse she used. When she told me I was enraged! After
I screamed for a half hour and calmed down I asked her: "so what did
the bitch have to say?" The answer was I hadn't lied or exaggerated
about anything. The woman was bad news and nuts.

I met another chick about 20 years ago on a blind date. We didn't hit
it off as a relationship but became good friends. When she was a kid
her older brothers and their friends would drag her in the bathroom,
hold her down, and take turns at her. It didn't stop until she was
old enough to stop them and/or avoid the situation. She's mid 50's
now and a total nutjob as far as relationships go. She claims to be
"pre" anorexic. <snork> She can tell you within 5% how many calories
she has per day. She buys packaged food and splits it up by the
serving size and calorie info. Her refrigerator has yogurt, carrots,
celery, and frozen hot pockets. The freezer has ice cream which she
only allows herself to eat on the weekend and she measures that too.
She just moved but her stove broke 6-7 years ago and she never
replaced it. She's 5'9" and 107 pounds. (size 0) She could be pretty
if she put 30-40 pounds on. Hasn't had a relationship since I met
her. Hell, she's so goofy she can't even get laid. I think it's been
5-6 years. She's a great friend and I care about her a lot but she's
a total nutjob. And I might be talking behind her back now but I
tell her all this to her face. She knows I know she's goofy. But if
all my friends were perfect I wouldn't have any.

Lou
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In article >,
Lou Decruss > wrote:


> across a few other nutjobs including one who peed on test strips to
> see if she was in ketosis.


I do that when I get sick. It can get pretty serious for a diabetic
when they go into ketosis.


> I don't know much about all that no-carb
> stuff but that was pretty weird


I'm not so keen on that, since they are doing it on purpose. Still,
maybe they have to watch and make sure it doesn't go out of control? I
don't know.

> especially since she saved the used
> strips.


That one totally baffles me. If you want to know your results (and the
doctor in the ER will want to know) then you write them down. There's a
color code on the container. You match the color and it tells you the
reading. The instructions say that the color continues to change after
you hit the time to read it. I don't know what happens after that, as I
always flush them with the pee.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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