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Old 18-09-2009, 08:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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Old 18-09-2009, 10:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.




http://www.kingarthurflour.com/
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Old 18-09-2009, 01:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 00:59:17 -0700, sf wrote:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.


The wheat is white to begin with:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/flour...eat-flour.html

Barry in Indy
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Old 18-09-2009, 01:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:16:47 GMT, PeterL2
wrote:

sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/


Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? It's either whole wheat or white, not both.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
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Old 18-09-2009, 01:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:16:47 GMT, PeterL2
wrote:

sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for

King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/


Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? It's either whole wheat or white, not both.



What, you can't read English???

From that website............

White Whole Wheat Flour

King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour has all the fiber and nutrition of
traditional whole wheat, with a milder flavor and lighter color. A tasty
way to add whole grains to your diet.

Milled from hard white wheat berry. Nothing is added, nothing is taken
away.


Hard white wheat

Hard white wheat has a high protein content and thus is good at
producing gluten, the elastic component of a dough that can capture and
hold carbon dioxide (the gas produced by yeast that raises your dough).
Unlike red wheat, white wheat lacks some of the pigmentation in the bran
layer of the wheat berry; since that pigment carries an astringent
flavor, white wheat is lighter in both color and flavor. It is grown
primarily in Kansas and is a winter wheat crop.

After eons of farmers and then scientists isolating and encouraging the
genetic development of more ďuser friendlyĒ characteristics, there are
over 30,000 varieties of wheat today, each with its own merits. Most
simply, we can classify current wheat varieties as some combination of
each of the following: hard or soft, red or white, winter or spring.

* Hard wheat has a higher protein content than soft wheat and thus
produces more gluten, the elastic component of a dough that can capture
and hold carbon dioxide (the gas produced by yeast that raises your
dough). Therefore, hard wheat is critical for yeast-leavened baked
goods, but is also appropriate for a wide range of baking.
* Hard winter wheat is planted in the fall, mainly in Texas,
Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska and other prairie states. It grows until itís
about five inches tall, and then with the onset of winter and cold
weather, it becomes dormant under snow cover, and continues growing the
following spring. Itís harvested in late spring and early summer. The
protein content of hard winter wheat ranges between 10 and 12 percent.
* Hard spring wheat grows predominantly in the Dakotas, Minnesota
and Montana, as well as in Canada, where the climate is more severe.
Itís planted in the spring and harvested in late summer and early fall.
Generally, the farther north you go, the more spring wheat youíll find
and the greater the levels of protein Ė generally 12 to 14 percent.
* Soft wheat has a larger percentage of carbohydrates and thus less
gluten-forming protein. Soft wheat can be red or white, and is almost
always winter wheat. Soft winter wheat is grown primarily east of the
Mississippi, from Missouri and Illinois east to Virginia and the
Carolinas in the South and New York in the North. There are also
important crops of soft white wheat in the Pacific Northwest. Soft wheat
is used to make cake and pastry flour.
* The color of wheat relates to pigments found primarily in the
bran. Both hard and soft wheat can be either red or white. White wheat
varieties simply lack some of the pigment that gives red wheat its dark
color.



Whole Wheat Flour

Americaís top-selling whole wheat flour, King Arthur Traditional 100%
Whole Wheat Flour includes all the nutrition, flavor, and texture of the
bran and germ in everything you bake with it.

Milled from a single stream of 100% of the hard red spring wheat berry
grown in the northern Great Plains. Nothing is added, nothing is taken
away.


Hard red spring wheat

Hard red spring wheat is typically higher in protein content than hard
red winter wheat and thus is very good at producing gluten, the elastic
component of a dough that can capture and hold carbon dioxide (the gas
produced by yeast that raises your dough), making it ideal for breads,
rolls, and pizza. Planted in the spring in the Dakotas, Minnesota,
Montana and Canada, hard red spring wheat is harvested in late summer
and early fall. It gets its red color from pigmentation in the bran
layer of the wheat berry.

After eons of farmers and then scientists isolating and encouraging the
genetic development of more ďuser friendlyĒ characteristics, there are
over 30,000 varieties of wheat today, each with its own merits. Most
simply, we can classify current wheat varieties as some combination of
each of the following: hard or soft, red or white, winter or spring.

* Hard wheat has a higher protein content than soft wheat and thus
produces more gluten, the elastic component of a dough that can capture
and hold carbon dioxide. Therefore, hard wheat is critical for yeast-
leavened baked goods, but is also appropriate for a wide range of
baking.
* Hard winter wheat is planted in the fall, mainly in Texas,
Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska and other prairie states. It grows until itís
about five inches tall, and then with the onset of winter and cold
weather, it becomes dormant under snow cover, and continues growing the
following spring. Itís harvested in late spring and early summer. The
protein content of hard winter wheat ranges between 10 and 12 percent.
* Hard spring wheat grows predominantly in the Dakotas, Minnesota
and Montana, as well as in Canada, where the climate is more severe.
Itís planted in the spring and harvested in late summer and early fall.
Generally, the farther north you go, the more spring wheat youíll find
and the greater the levels of protein Ė generally 12 to 14 percent.
* Soft wheat has a larger percentage of carbohydrates and thus less
gluten-forming protein. Soft wheat can be red or white, and is almost
always winter wheat. Soft winter wheat is grown primarily east of the
Mississippi, from Missouri and Illinois east to Virginia and the
Carolinas in the South and New York in the North. There are also
important crops of soft white wheat in the Pacific Northwest. Soft wheat
is used to make cake and pastry flour.
* The color of wheat relates to pigments found primarily in the
bran. Both hard and soft wheat can be either red or white. White wheat
varieties simply lack the pigment that gives red wheat its dark color.


Why youíll love this flour. Its fine grind and 14% protein content
produce whole-wheat breads with a hearty texture and higher rise.



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Old 18-09-2009, 01:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"sf" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:16:47 GMT, PeterL2
wrote:

sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/


Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? It's either whole wheat or white, not both.

There are 2 whole wheat flours. One is the traditional whole wheat ground
from hard red spring wheat, the other is white whole wheat ground from hard
white wheat. The white whole wheat is naturally lighter in color and taste
and is not bleached to make it white. The white whole wheat has all the
nutrients and properties of traditional whole wheat. It is the same except
for color. It is not an all purpose flour.
Janet


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Old 18-09-2009, 01:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 05:06:51 -0700, sf wrote:

Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? It's either whole wheat or white, not both.


You could have looked at the damn website rather than bitching about
not being spoon-fed the information you're seeking.

-sw
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Old 18-09-2009, 02:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sep 18, 8:06*am, sf wrote:
On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:16:47 GMT, PeterL2
wrote:

sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. *It both perplexed and amused me. *The ad says....


unbleached
white whole wheat
flour


HUH? Whazzat mean? *Sounds like something for everyone.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/


Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? *It's either whole wheat or white, not both.


I've used it. It.works just like regular whole wheat flour, but it
is almost white is color. For a while, it was how we snuck whole
grain bread into the munchkin.

maxine in ri
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Old 18-09-2009, 02:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 06:46:22 -0600, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
.. .
On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:16:47 GMT, PeterL2
wrote:

sf wrote in news:[email protected]
4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for King
Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/


Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? It's either whole wheat or white, not both.

There are 2 whole wheat flours. One is the traditional whole wheat ground
from hard red spring wheat, the other is white whole wheat ground from hard
white wheat. The white whole wheat is naturally lighter in color and taste
and is not bleached to make it white. The white whole wheat has all the
nutrients and properties of traditional whole wheat. It is the same except
for color. It is not an all purpose flour.
Janet

Thanks Janet. I had a hard time wrapping my mind around white and
whole wheat in the same term. I've only come across brown whole wheat
flour.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
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Old 18-09-2009, 02:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:01:02 -0400, Barry
wrote:

The wheat is white to begin with:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/flour...eat-flour.html

Barry in Indy


The problem is I'd never heard of white wheat so white whole wheat
sounded like a contradiction in terms. I've only seen brown whole
wheat and of course it's unbleached.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.


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Old 18-09-2009, 02:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 06:22:46 -0700 (PDT), maxine
wrote:

I've used it. It.works just like regular whole wheat flour, but it
is almost white is color. For a while, it was how we snuck whole
grain bread into the munchkin.


I'm liking this idea a whole bunch! I bake with white, but if I can
make it whole wheat too - why not? Are you able to pick it up at your
regular grocery store or do you have to make a special trip somewhere?
I don't recall seeing it in mine. I'd remember that.

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
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Old 18-09-2009, 03:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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sf wrote in
:

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 06:46:22 -0600, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
. ..
On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 09:16:47 GMT, PeterL2
wrote:

sf wrote in
news:[email protected] 4ax.com:


Looking at one of my cooking magazines and came across an ad for
King Arthur Flour. It both perplexed and amused me. The ad
says....

unbleached
white whole wheat
flour

HUH? Whazzat mean? Sounds like something for everyone.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/

Do you think I would have asked if I understood what the h*ll they
were talking about? It's either whole wheat or white, not both.

There are 2 whole wheat flours. One is the traditional whole wheat
ground from hard red spring wheat, the other is white whole wheat
ground from hard white wheat. The white whole wheat is naturally
lighter in color and taste and is not bleached to make it white. The
white whole wheat has all the nutrients and properties of traditional
whole wheat. It is the same except for color. It is not an all
purpose flour. Janet

Thanks Janet. I had a hard time wrapping my mind around white and
whole wheat in the same term. I've only come across brown whole wheat
flour.




Which reads: I mouthed off without reading what was on the website.
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Old 18-09-2009, 05:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Not all flour is equal. There are a great deal of additives put into
flour which is not good for us and causing so many health problems in
our country. Here is the web address of a better flour that we have
'Wheat Montana ~ Home' (http://www.wheatmontana.com/)

When I use their flour it always tastes better and there are far less
preservatives in it. They also have controls over how it is grown in the
field, and the farmers have to do things to their standards.


--
Dymphna
Message origin: www.TRAVEL.com

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Old 18-09-2009, 07:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 11:46:56 -0500, Dymphna
wrote:


Not all flour is equal. There are a great deal of additives put into
flour which is not good for us and causing so many health problems in
our country. Here is the web address of a better flour that we have
'Wheat Montana ~ Home' (http://www.wheatmontana.com/)

When I use their flour it always tastes better and there are far less
preservatives in it. They also have controls over how it is grown in the
field, and the farmers have to do things to their standards.



I am a big fan of Wheat Montana, but believe me, KA flour is of
excellent quality and cannot be criticized for any of the reasons you
mention.

WM is not "better' than KA, nor is KA "better" than WM - each company
offers up high quality flours to home bakers. I use both, along with
Hecker's, primarily. Some kinds of WM are perfect for some of my
breads and pastries, some of the KA are preferred for others of them,
and Hecker's is my fall-back AP flour that I can use in about any
recipe as I know it so well.

I also use Hodgson Mill and Bob's Red Mill among other flours. And I
am guessing you really don't know anything about KA flour at all, do
you?

Boron
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Old 18-09-2009, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Dymphna" wrote in message
news

Not all flour is equal. There are a great deal of additives put into
flour which is not good for us and causing so many health problems in
our country. Here is the web address of a better flour that we have
'Wheat Montana ~ Home' (http://www.wheatmontana.com/)

When I use their flour it always tastes better and there are far less
preservatives in it. They also have controls over how it is grown in the
field, and the farmers have to do things to their standards.


--
Dymphna

To bad they decided to put in a deli/bakery instead of an honest bakery and
flour supply store here. They couldn't make a go of it on mediocre
sandwiches. I bought as much flour from them in 50 pounds sacks as I could
store. After an initial display for the grand opening, I had to order the
flour and wait weeks for it to arrive. I have no interest in buying their
flour in 5 pound bags from Wal-Mart. I love their flour. Too bad they
don't make a sales connection with Cash and Carry, they are located in the
West.
Janet




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