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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/cvcookix.html

Conversion Table for Cooking
U.S. to Metric:
http://tinyurl.com/n59ap7

Metric to U.S.:
http://tinyurl.com/lync5h

Cooking Measurment Equivalents:
http://tinyurl.com/nosqzo

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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 20:04:02 -0700 (PDT), Manda Ruby >
wrote:

-->http://www.botanical.com/botanical/cvcookix.html
-->
-->Conversion Table for Cooking
-->U.S. to Metric:
-->http://tinyurl.com/n59ap7
-->
-->Metric to U.S.:
-->http://tinyurl.com/lync5h
-->
-->Cooking Measurment Equivalents:
-->http://tinyurl.com/nosqzo



or you could try this one http://foodforu.ca/convert.html
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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:51:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
> wrote:

>On Sep 18, 11:33*am, wrote:
>> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 07:56:14 -0500, ffu > wrote:
>>
>> >or you could try this onehttp://foodforu.ca/convert.html

>>
>> Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
>> don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
>>
>> Ross.

>
>Two oranges = 1.75 apples ( red only)
>
>Well know quantum-metric fruit conversion


But John, doesn't that only apply where the red and orange colour
wavelengths and frequencies converge at 422 nanometres and 482
terahertz respectively?
Does that factor still apply if the apple is redder?

Ross.
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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 11:43:42 -0500, ffu > wrote:

>On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 12:12:38 -0400, wrote:
>
>-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:51:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
> wrote:
>-->
>-->>On Sep 18, 11:33*am, wrote:
>-->>> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 07:56:14 -0500, ffu > wrote:
>-->>>
>-->>> >or you could try this onehttp://foodforu.ca/convert.html
>-->>>
>-->>> Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
>-->>> don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
>-->>>
>-->>> Ross.
>-->>
>-->>Two oranges = 1.75 apples ( red only)
>-->>
>-->>Well know quantum-metric fruit conversion
>-->
>-->But John, doesn't that only apply where the red and orange colour
>-->wavelengths and frequencies converge at 422 nanometres and 482
>-->terahertz respectively?
>-->Does that factor still apply if the apple is redder?
>-->
>-->Ross.
>
>
>that's 1800 MHz., anything over that and the apple will turn an orangey hue


But, you didn't address my original question which was:

Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
My question was, BTW, tongue in cheek.
A factor for converting apples to oranges does not exist, not does one
for converting fluid ounces to grams.
You can't convert a volume measurement to a weight measurement. You
would require a different factor for each *fluid* being converted.
Here's a start for you:
fluid ounces of water to grams, factor is 29 (close enough)
fluid ounces of mercury to grams, factor is 402 (again, close enough)

Substitute *avoirdupois* for *fluid*, or simply eliminate *fluid* in
your converter and the result will be closer to the truth.

Ross.


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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 18:14:07 -0400, wrote:

-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 11:43:42 -0500, ffu > wrote:
-->
-->>On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 12:12:38 -0400,
wrote:
-->>
-->>-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:51:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
> wrote:
-->>-->
-->>-->>On Sep 18, 11:33*am, wrote:
-->>-->>> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 07:56:14 -0500, ffu > wrote:
-->>-->>>
-->>-->>> >or you could try this onehttp://foodforu.ca/convert.html
-->>-->>>
-->>-->>> Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
-->>-->>> don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
-->>-->>>
-->>-->>> Ross.
-->>-->>
-->>-->>Two oranges = 1.75 apples ( red only)
-->>-->>
-->>-->>Well know quantum-metric fruit conversion
-->>-->
-->>-->But John, doesn't that only apply where the red and orange colour
-->>-->wavelengths and frequencies converge at 422 nanometres and 482
-->>-->terahertz respectively?
-->>-->Does that factor still apply if the apple is redder?
-->>-->
-->>-->Ross.
-->>
-->>
-->>that's 1800 MHz., anything over that and the apple will turn an orangey
hue
-->
-->But, you didn't address my original question which was:
-->
-->Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
-->don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
-->My question was, BTW, tongue in cheek.
-->A factor for converting apples to oranges does not exist, not does one
-->for converting fluid ounces to grams.
-->You can't convert a volume measurement to a weight measurement. You
-->would require a different factor for each *fluid* being converted.
-->Here's a start for you:
-->fluid ounces of water to grams, factor is 29 (close enough)
-->fluid ounces of mercury to grams, factor is 402 (again, close enough)
-->
-->Substitute *avoirdupois* for *fluid*, or simply eliminate *fluid* in
-->your converter and the result will be closer to the truth.
-->
-->Ross.

Are you saying that fluid has no weight? What can you expect for a free UK
script
Test it, it will work.
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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

ffu said...

> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 18:14:07 -0400, wrote:
>
> -->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 11:43:42 -0500, ffu > wrote:
> -->
> -->>On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 12:12:38 -0400,
wrote:
> -->>
> -->>-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:51:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
> > wrote:
> -->>-->
> -->>-->>On Sep 18, 11:33*am, wrote:
> -->>-->>> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 07:56:14 -0500, ffu >
> wrote: -->>-->>>
> -->>-->>> >or you could try this onehttp://foodforu.ca/convert.html
> -->>-->>>
> -->>-->>> Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams,
> why -->>-->>> don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
> -->>-->>>
> -->>-->>> Ross.
> -->>-->>
> -->>-->>Two oranges = 1.75 apples ( red only)
> -->>-->>
> -->>-->>Well know quantum-metric fruit conversion
> -->>-->
> -->>-->But John, doesn't that only apply where the red and orange colour
> -->>-->wavelengths and frequencies converge at 422 nanometres and 482
> -->>-->terahertz respectively?
> -->>-->Does that factor still apply if the apple is redder?
> -->>-->
> -->>-->Ross.
> -->>
> -->>
> -->>that's 1800 MHz., anything over that and the apple will turn an
> orangey hue
> -->
> -->But, you didn't address my original question which was:
> -->
> -->Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
> -->don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
> -->My question was, BTW, tongue in cheek.
> -->A factor for converting apples to oranges does not exist, not does
> one -->for converting fluid ounces to grams.
> -->You can't convert a volume measurement to a weight measurement. You
> -->would require a different factor for each *fluid* being converted.
> -->Here's a start for you:
> -->fluid ounces of water to grams, factor is 29 (close enough)
> -->fluid ounces of mercury to grams, factor is 402 (again, close enough)
> -->
> -->Substitute *avoirdupois* for *fluid*, or simply eliminate *fluid* in
> -->your converter and the result will be closer to the truth.
> -->
> -->Ross.
>
> Are you saying that fluid has no weight? What can you expect for a free
> UK script
> Test it, it will work.



Wouldn't it be better measured in a cup of apple juice to a cup of orange
juice. Then let the flavor debate begin.

Andy
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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 20:49:27 -0500, Andy > wrote:

-->ffu said...
-->
-->> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 18:14:07 -0400, wrote:
-->>
-->> -->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 11:43:42 -0500, ffu > wrote:
-->> -->
-->> -->>On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 12:12:38 -0400,
wrote:
-->> -->>
-->> -->>-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:51:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
-->> > wrote:
-->> -->>-->
-->> -->>-->>On Sep 18, 11:33*am, wrote:
-->> -->>-->>> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 07:56:14 -0500, ffu >
-->> wrote: -->>-->>>
-->> -->>-->>> >or you could try this onehttp://foodforu.ca/convert.html
-->> -->>-->>>
-->> -->>-->>> Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams,
-->> why -->>-->>> don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
-->> -->>-->>>
-->> -->>-->>> Ross.
-->> -->>-->>
-->> -->>-->>Two oranges = 1.75 apples ( red only)
-->> -->>-->>
-->> -->>-->>Well know quantum-metric fruit conversion
-->> -->>-->
-->> -->>-->But John, doesn't that only apply where the red and orange colour
-->> -->>-->wavelengths and frequencies converge at 422 nanometres and 482
-->> -->>-->terahertz respectively?
-->> -->>-->Does that factor still apply if the apple is redder?
-->> -->>-->
-->> -->>-->Ross.
-->> -->>
-->> -->>
-->> -->>that's 1800 MHz., anything over that and the apple will turn an
-->> orangey hue
-->> -->
-->> -->But, you didn't address my original question which was:
-->> -->
-->> -->Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
-->> -->don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
-->> -->My question was, BTW, tongue in cheek.
-->> -->A factor for converting apples to oranges does not exist, not does
-->> one -->for converting fluid ounces to grams.
-->> -->You can't convert a volume measurement to a weight measurement. You
-->> -->would require a different factor for each *fluid* being converted.
-->> -->Here's a start for you:
-->> -->fluid ounces of water to grams, factor is 29 (close enough)
-->> -->fluid ounces of mercury to grams, factor is 402 (again, close enough)
-->> -->
-->> -->Substitute *avoirdupois* for *fluid*, or simply eliminate *fluid* in
-->> -->your converter and the result will be closer to the truth.
-->> -->
-->> -->Ross.
-->>
-->> Are you saying that fluid has no weight? What can you expect for a free
-->> UK script
-->> Test it, it will work.
-->
-->
-->Wouldn't it be better measured in a cup of apple juice to a cup of orange
-->juice. Then let the flavor debate begin.
-->
-->Andy

Me, I'd go for the apple sauce
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Default Conversion Table for Cooking (for my record and yours)

On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 20:42:04 -0500, ffu > wrote:

>On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 18:14:07 -0400, wrote:
>
>-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 11:43:42 -0500, ffu > wrote:
>-->
>-->>On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 12:12:38 -0400,
wrote:
>-->>
>-->>-->On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 08:51:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
> wrote:
>-->>-->
>-->>-->>On Sep 18, 11:33*am, wrote:
>-->>-->>> On Fri, 18 Sep 2009 07:56:14 -0500, ffu > wrote:
>-->>-->>>
>-->>-->>> >or you could try this onehttp://foodforu.ca/convert.html
>-->>-->>>
>-->>-->>> Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
>-->>-->>> don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
>-->>-->>>
>-->>-->>> Ross.
>-->>-->>
>-->>-->>Two oranges = 1.75 apples ( red only)
>-->>-->>
>-->>-->>Well know quantum-metric fruit conversion
>-->>-->
>-->>-->But John, doesn't that only apply where the red and orange colour
>-->>-->wavelengths and frequencies converge at 422 nanometres and 482
>-->>-->terahertz respectively?
>-->>-->Does that factor still apply if the apple is redder?
>-->>-->
>-->>-->Ross.
>-->>
>-->>
>-->>that's 1800 MHz., anything over that and the apple will turn an orangey
>hue
>-->
>-->But, you didn't address my original question which was:
>-->
>-->Since you have a conversion factor for fluid ounces to grams, why
>-->don't you have one for converting apples to oranges?
>-->My question was, BTW, tongue in cheek.
>-->A factor for converting apples to oranges does not exist, not does one
>-->for converting fluid ounces to grams.
>-->You can't convert a volume measurement to a weight measurement. You
>-->would require a different factor for each *fluid* being converted.
>-->Here's a start for you:
>-->fluid ounces of water to grams, factor is 29 (close enough)
>-->fluid ounces of mercury to grams, factor is 402 (again, close enough)
>-->
>-->Substitute *avoirdupois* for *fluid*, or simply eliminate *fluid* in
>-->your converter and the result will be closer to the truth.
>-->
>-->Ross.
>
>Are you saying that fluid has no weight? What can you expect for a free UK
>script
>Test it, it will work.


Of course fluids have weight.
You just can't seem to grasp the fact that all fluids do not have the
same weight per unit volume.

Ross.
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