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Old 14-07-2009, 11:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there any
significance difference between using these two? Thanks.



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Old 14-07-2009, 01:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

john royce wrote:
I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there any
significance difference between using these two? Thanks.



I am by now means qualified to truly answer apart from experience .

But Corn flour or rice flour come out and taste better than the
alternatives you offered .

However, with the caveat that I more often than not stuff up with
sauces when using anything other than corn flour . Even then its
hit & miss .
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Old 14-07-2009, 01:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

Phil..c said...

john royce wrote:
I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of
cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy'
texture. Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is
there any significance difference between using these two? Thanks.



I am by now means qualified to truly answer apart from experience .

But Corn flour or rice flour come out and taste better than the
alternatives you offered .

However, with the caveat that I more often than not stuff up with
sauces when using anything other than corn flour . Even then its
hit & miss .



Hi phil.c,

I'd add, some thickeners require different temperatures to actively begin
thickening. Something I learned from Alton Brown's "Good Eats" TV program.

Filé powder, optionally used in place of okra in gumbos is a low temp
thickener added after plating. I don't recall if it adds flavor to the bowl
of gumbo. I've only used it once. Anyone?

Andy
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Old 14-07-2009, 01:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:37:02 +0100, "john royce"
wrote:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there any
significance difference between using these two? Thanks.

There's a big difference between the two. I wouldn't thicken a sauce
with self raising unless I was in a pinch and it was the only thing in
the house to use... but who is ever in that predicament?

Plain flour is, well... plain. Self Raising is more than just flour

Copied and pasted from Wikipedia just for you:

Self-rising or self-raising flour is flour that is sold premixed with
chemical leavening agents. It was invented by Henry Jones.

Self-rising flour is typically composed of the following ratio:

1 cup (100 g) flour
1 and 1/2 teaspoon (3 g) baking powder
a pinch to ˝ teaspoon (1 g or less) salt

Here is a discussion on thickening curry.... scroll down to the last,
I think it makes the most sense for a beginner and it sounds like you
are one.

This server seems to be painfully slow, but it has curry recipes (from
different countries) that may give you some ideas about what to do.
http://www.ifood.tv/network/curry_coconut/recipes

Here's our household favorite. We just order it as take out.
Mussman or Massaman Curry video
http://www.ifood.tv/recipe/massaman_curry
recipe with still pictures
http://www.thaitable.com/Thai/recipes/Masaman_Curry.htm

--
I love cooking with wine.
Sometimes I even put it in the food.
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Old 14-07-2009, 04:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

"john royce" wrote in message
...
I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there any
significance difference between using these two? Thanks.


We like the taste of flour the best for thickening. Gold Medal makes a
flour called Wondra, it is for making sauce and gravy. It is designed to
mix in smoothly and not lump. I have used it for years, and it works great.
It comes in a round container with a shake or measure top.

later,

DP




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Old 14-07-2009, 05:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

"john royce" wrote in
:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of
cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy'
texture. Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there
any significance difference between using these two? Thanks.






You do *not* use flour to thicken a curry.

You simmer the sauce until it reduces and thickens naturally, with more
flavour.


*Never* use flour to thicken a curry!!


Heathen.


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Old 14-07-2009, 05:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

In article ,
"john royce" wrote:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there any
significance difference between using these two? Thanks.


I personally prefer arrowroot or corn starch.
--
Peace! Om

Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
It's about learning to dance in the rain.
-- Anon.


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Old 14-07-2009, 06:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

Omelet wrote on Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:56:47 -0500:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the
end of cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a
slightly 'gloupy' texture. Which leaves using plain flour or
self raising flour. Is there any significance difference
between using these two? Thanks.


I personally prefer arrowroot or corn starch.


Escoffier did not approve of the taste of uncooked flour and nor do I.
If you can't use a roux, I think cornstarch is best. Certainly, it's all
I would use for Chinese food. I use non-fat yoghurt in curries despite
the conditioned reflex of authors that warn it will curdle. It doesn't
if you mix it with a spoonful or two of flour and in that case the flour
does get cooked.
--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 14-07-2009, 06:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

In article ,
"James Silverton" wrote:

Omelet wrote on Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:56:47 -0500:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the
end of cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a
slightly 'gloupy' texture. Which leaves using plain flour or
self raising flour. Is there any significance difference
between using these two? Thanks.


I personally prefer arrowroot or corn starch.


Escoffier did not approve of the taste of uncooked flour and nor do I.
If you can't use a roux, I think cornstarch is best. Certainly, it's all
I would use for Chinese food. I use non-fat yoghurt in curries despite
the conditioned reflex of authors that warn it will curdle. It doesn't
if you mix it with a spoonful or two of flour and in that case the flour
does get cooked.


Corn starch is good, but my second choice. :-)

ymmv of course! Have you tried arrowroot?
--
Peace! Om

Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
It's about learning to dance in the rain.
-- Anon.


Subscribe:

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Old 14-07-2009, 06:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking


"Andy" wrote in message ...
Phil..c said...

john royce wrote:
I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of
cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy'
texture. Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is
there any significance difference between using these two? Thanks.



I am by now means qualified to truly answer apart from experience .

But Corn flour or rice flour come out and taste better than the
alternatives you offered .

However, with the caveat that I more often than not stuff up with
sauces when using anything other than corn flour . Even then its
hit & miss .



Hi phil.c,

I'd add, some thickeners require different temperatures to actively begin
thickening. Something I learned from Alton Brown's "Good Eats" TV program.

Filé powder, optionally used in place of okra in gumbos is a low temp
thickener added after plating. I don't recall if it adds flavor to the
bowl
of gumbo. I've only used it once. Anyone?

Andy


It adds a little bit of a fairly distinct herbal flavor. Most of it's
benefit comes from thickening. I wouldn't put it in anything that was
delicately flavored, though.

I did try sprinkling some on scrambled eggs just before they set once. I
wouldn't do it again.

Jon




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Old 14-07-2009, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking


"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"James Silverton" wrote:

Omelet wrote on Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:56:47 -0500:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the
end of cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a
slightly 'gloupy' texture. Which leaves using plain flour or
self raising flour. Is there any significance difference
between using these two? Thanks.


I personally prefer arrowroot or corn starch.


Escoffier did not approve of the taste of uncooked flour and nor do I.
If you can't use a roux, I think cornstarch is best. Certainly, it's all
I would use for Chinese food. I use non-fat yoghurt in curries despite
the conditioned reflex of authors that warn it will curdle. It doesn't
if you mix it with a spoonful or two of flour and in that case the flour
does get cooked.


Corn starch is good, but my second choice. :-)

ymmv of course! Have you tried arrowroot?
--


Hi Om,
How do you use arrowroot to thicken? Do you mix it with water first?

Have to check the date on my jar of arrowroot. I think the expiration date
is probably mid-90's.

Jon


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Old 14-07-2009, 08:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

On Tue 14 Jul 2009 08:32:08a, Dale P told us...

"john royce" wrote in message
...
I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of
cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy'
texture. Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there
any significance difference between using these two? Thanks.


We like the taste of flour the best for thickening. Gold Medal makes a
flour called Wondra, it is for making sauce and gravy. It is designed
to mix in smoothly and not lump. I have used it for years, and it works
great. It comes in a round container with a shake or measure top.

later,

DP




Agreed...


--
Wayne Boatwright
------------------------------------------------------------------------
In Mexico we have a word for sushi: bait. ~José Simons



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Old 14-07-2009, 08:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

Omelet wrote:
*"john royce" wrote:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. *Is there any
significance difference between using these two? * Thanks.


I personally prefer arrowroot or corn starch.


Supposedly the best way to thicken sauce is to simmer it
a long time until its natural gelatin thickens it. I've tried
this and agree but I rarely have the patience. If a curry is
made by mixing the meat in at the end this method would
not work.

I like cream as a thicken and that too probably wouldn't
apply to a curry. It takes a lot less patience than simmering
the natural gelatin.

I perfer arrowroot to corn starch. With arrowroot I can
sprinkle a little in on the surface of the sauce then stir it in
and it doesn't clump. With corn starch I need to mix it with
water in an extra little bowl and then pour the watered
mixture in. The arrowroot is less work.

Being wheat intolerant I don't use wheat flour for thickening.
Rice flour or flour made from various other plants that have
been ground up. For any that I've tried I end up liking cream
or arrowroot better.
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Old 14-07-2009, 09:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"James Silverton" wrote:

Omelet wrote on Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:56:47 -0500:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the
end of cooking. I been told that using cornflour produces a
slightly 'gloupy' texture. Which leaves using plain flour or
self raising flour. Is there any significance difference
between using these two? Thanks.


I personally prefer arrowroot or corn starch.


Escoffier did not approve of the taste of uncooked flour and nor do I.
If you can't use a roux, I think cornstarch is best. Certainly, it's all
I would use for Chinese food. I use non-fat yoghurt in curries despite
the conditioned reflex of authors that warn it will curdle. It doesn't
if you mix it with a spoonful or two of flour and in that case the flour
does get cooked.


Corn starch is good, but my second choice. :-)

ymmv of course! Have you tried arrowroot?
--
Peace! Om


Arrowroot is expensive. I use a slurry of corn starch and cold water to
thicken sauces and gravies.

Jill

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Old 14-07-2009, 09:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default choice of flours to thicken after cooking

john royce wrote:

I like to make curries and then thicken them up towards the end of cooking.
I been told that using cornflour produces a slightly 'gloupy' texture.
Which leaves using plain flour or self raising flour. Is there any
significance difference between using these two? Thanks.


A proper curry doesn't need a thickener. But if you
feel the need to thicken it, a more traditional
ingredient would be a potato. Grate it, and it
should disintegrate completely during cooking.
Add it at the beginning of cooking to give it time
to let go.


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