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Old 04-06-2009, 05:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.

We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. We
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. We also bought Humbugs. They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. I think they may have had
horehound in them. They were wonderful on a sore throat.

When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!

After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. They used to sell it at the airport.

Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. And Keen's
dry English Mustard and huge sweet Australian raisins . . .

Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo

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Old 04-06-2009, 03:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Jun 4, 12:53*am, Lynn from Fargo wrote:
North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". *Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. *Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. *Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.

We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. *We
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. *Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. *It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. *We also bought Humbugs. *They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. *I think they may have had
horehound in them. *They were wonderful on a sore throat.

When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. *Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. *Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!

After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. *It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. *They used to sell it at the airport.

Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. *And Keen's
dry English Mustard and huge sweet *Australian raisins . . .

Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. *Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. *Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


Amazing, I hadn't realised that one couldn't get MacIntosh Toffee or
humbugs in the States. Did you ever try the 'black balls" (3 for a
penny when I was a kid) that variety stores used to sell. Black outer
coating with a hard white interior.

"After I was married and could go to Winnipeg" Is this some even
stranger border control thing that I have not heard about? Something
like not going to Cuba?

John Kane Kingston ON Canada

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Old 04-06-2009, 05:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Jun 4, 9:39*am, John Kane wrote:
On Jun 4, 12:53*am, Lynn from Fargo wrote:



North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". *Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. *Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. *Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.


We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. *We
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. *Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. *It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. *We also bought Humbugs. *They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. *I think they may have had
horehound in them. *They were wonderful on a sore throat.


When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. *Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. *Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!


After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. *It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. *They used to sell it at the airport.


Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. *And Keen's
dry English Mustard and huge sweet *Australian raisins . . .


Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. *Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. *Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


Amazing, I hadn't realised that one couldn't get MacIntosh Toffee or
humbugs in the States. Did you ever try the 'black balls" (3 for a
penny when I was a kid) that variety stores used to sell. *Black outer
coating with a hard white interior.

"After I was married and could go to Winnipeg" *Is this some even
stranger border control thing that I have not heard about? *Something
like not going to Cuba?

John Kane Kingston ON Canada


No, my family always went to Brandon, Manitoba where we had shirt tail
cousins. Went to Winnipeg with my husband years ago - been back once
for a day at the Folk Festival up and back in the same day - not even
a trip into the city! Got friends in Toronto, been there once, loved
it! Great town for foodies and jazz.
Lynn in Fargo
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Old 04-06-2009, 05:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

Lynn from Fargo wrote:
North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.

We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. We
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. We also bought Humbugs. They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. I think they may have had
horehound in them. They were wonderful on a sore throat.


I think that a lot of dentists made a lot of money of MacIntosh Toffee.
It is good stuff. A bar of that stuff would last me all day. I have not
touched it in years.



When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!


My mother used to make bread too. About once a week she would bake a
dozen or more loaves. We would come home from school and snack on bread
fresh from the oven with butter and her home made jams.


Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. And Keen's
dry English Mustard and huge sweet Australian raisins . . .


I had some American friends who lived hear for a while and they always
raved about our cheddar cheese. Whenever they came back to visit they
always took back lots of cheddar. They also stocked up on Red River
cereal.


Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. Gotta love 'em!


One of our sweet treats that I am surprised never seems to have caught
on in the US is butter tarts. And then there is Nanaimo bars. Like
butter tarts,one is not enough and two is one too many.



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Old 04-06-2009, 06:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Jun 4, 12:54*pm, Dave Smith wrote:

One of our sweet treats that I am surprised never seems to have caught
on in the US is butter tarts. *And then there is Nanaimo bars. Like
butter tarts,one is not enough and two is one too many.


I remember looking for a butter tart recipe in the Joy of Cooking and
being rather surprised that there wasn't one.

John Kane Kingston ON Canada




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Old 04-06-2009, 06:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote in news:39bdec4c-ea6d-4bd6-adbf-
on Jun Thu 2009 am

On Jun 4, 9:39*am, John Kane wrote:
On Jun 4, 12:53*am, Lynn from Fargo wrote:



North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". *Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. *Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. *Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.


We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. *W

e
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. *Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. *It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. *We also bought Humbugs. *They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. *I think they may have had
horehound in them. *They were wonderful on a sore throat.


When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. *Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. *Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!


After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. *It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. *They used to sell it at the airport.


Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. *And Keen'

s
dry English Mustard and huge sweet *Australian raisins . . .


Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. *Responsible for my diabetes

,
cholesterol level and dental problems. *Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


Amazing, I hadn't realised that one couldn't get MacIntosh Toffee or
humbugs in the States. Did you ever try the 'black balls" (3 for a
penny when I was a kid) that variety stores used to sell. *Black outer
coating with a hard white interior.

"After I was married and could go to Winnipeg" *Is this some even
stranger border control thing that I have not heard about? *Something
like not going to Cuba?

John Kane Kingston ON Canada


No, my family always went to Brandon, Manitoba where we had shirt tail
cousins. Went to Winnipeg with my husband years ago - been back once
for a day at the Folk Festival up and back in the same day - not even
a trip into the city! Got friends in Toronto, been there once, loved
it! Great town for foodies and jazz.
Lynn in Fargo


Come up to Winterpeg in the fall for folkarama...many ethnic pavillions...lots of good food.

--

The beet goes on -Alan



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Old 04-06-2009, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Thu, 4 Jun 2009 10:24:36 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
wrote:

On Jun 4, 12:54*pm, Dave Smith wrote:

One of our sweet treats that I am surprised never seems to have caught
on in the US is butter tarts. *And then there is Nanaimo bars. Like
butter tarts,one is not enough and two is one too many.


I remember looking for a butter tart recipe in the Joy of Cooking and
being rather surprised that there wasn't one.

John Kane Kingston ON Canada


Hey John, you're in Ontario so I'm sure you've had this. My mother in
law who is French puts oatmeal in hers. Calls it Greo' Pie (sp?),
basically oatmeal pie.



* Exported from MasterCook *

Butter Tart Pie

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Canadian Pie/tart

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3 Eggs
3/4 c Brown sugar -- packed
3/4 c Corn syrup
3 tb Butter -- melted
4 ts Flour -- all purpose
1 1/2 ts Vanilla
1/4 ts -salt
2 1/4 c Currants or raisins
1 Pie shell, 9", unbaked

In bowl, beat eggs lightly. Stir in brown sugar, corn syrup, butter,
flour, vanilla and salt until blended. Stir in currants or raisins.
Pour in pie shell. Bake in 400F for 5 minutes. Remove heat to 250F.
Bake for about 30 minutes longer or till centre is just firm to the
touch, covering edges of pastry with foil if browning too much. Let
cool completely before cutting. MAKES:10 Serving

This version of butter tarts (a Canadian speciality) is easier to
prepare than the traditional individual tarts. It is very rich and
best served in small pieces.

Source: Canadian Living Magazine


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 3821 Calories; 291g Fat (66.6%
calories from fat); 23g Protein; 305g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary
Fiber; 1381mg Cholesterol; 3360mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2
Grain(Starch); 2 1/2 Lean Meat; 56 1/2 Fat; 19 1/2 Other
Carbohydrates.
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Old 04-06-2009, 06:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Thu, 04 Jun 2009 17:25:06 GMT, hahabogus
wrote:

Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote in news:39bdec4c-ea6d-4bd6-adbf-
on Jun Thu 2009 am

On Jun 4, 9:39*am, John Kane wrote:
On Jun 4, 12:53*am, Lynn from Fargo wrote:



North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". *Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. *Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. *Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.

We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. *W

e
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. *Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. *It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. *We also bought Humbugs. *They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. *I think they may have had
horehound in them. *They were wonderful on a sore throat.

When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. *Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. *Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!

After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. *It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. *They used to sell it at the airport.

Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. *And Keen'

s
dry English Mustard and huge sweet *Australian raisins . . .

Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. *Responsible for my diabetes

,
cholesterol level and dental problems. *Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo

Amazing, I hadn't realised that one couldn't get MacIntosh Toffee or
humbugs in the States. Did you ever try the 'black balls" (3 for a
penny when I was a kid) that variety stores used to sell. *Black outer
coating with a hard white interior.

"After I was married and could go to Winnipeg" *Is this some even
stranger border control thing that I have not heard about? *Something
like not going to Cuba?

John Kane Kingston ON Canada


No, my family always went to Brandon, Manitoba where we had shirt tail
cousins. Went to Winnipeg with my husband years ago - been back once
for a day at the Folk Festival up and back in the same day - not even
a trip into the city! Got friends in Toronto, been there once, loved
it! Great town for foodies and jazz.
Lynn in Fargo


Come up to Winterpeg in the fall for folkarama...many ethnic pavillions...lots of good food.


Allan, you are here???



Yes Folkarama is huge, then there's Festival du Voyageur.
http://www.winnipegkiosk.ca/winnipeg-events/index.php
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Old 04-06-2009, 06:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Jun 4, 10:39*am, John Kane wrote:
On Jun 4, 12:53*am, Lynn from Fargo wrote:





North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". *Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. *Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. *Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.


We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. *We
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. *Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. *It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. *We also bought Humbugs. *They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. *I think they may have had
horehound in them. *They were wonderful on a sore throat.


When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. *Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. *Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!


After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. *It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. *They used to sell it at the airport.


Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. *And Keen's
dry English Mustard and huge sweet *Australian raisins . . .


Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. *Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. *Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


Amazing, I hadn't realised that one couldn't get MacIntosh Toffee or
humbugs in the States. Did you ever try the 'black balls" (3 for a
penny when I was a kid) that variety stores used to sell. *Black outer
coating with a hard white interior.

"After I was married and could go to Winnipeg" *Is this some even
stranger border control thing that I have not heard about? *Something
like not going to Cuba?

John Kane Kingston ON Canada- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I love MacIntosh and always get some when over the border. Some
restaurants had it in ice cream topping form, too. I'd like to get a
hold of that!

Kris
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Old 04-06-2009, 07:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

Lynn from Fargo wrote:

Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


The Red Rose brand tea they sell in Canada is far superior to the same
brand they sell here in the US. The Canadian brand is much stronger.
It's the only tea that I will consider putting milk in. Without milk it
jangles my teeth.

I am a huge fan of butter tarts. The plain ones not the wannabee pecan
pie ones. I also love a bag of Tim Bits from Tim Horton's but I
understand they have franchises in the US now.

The very first bison burger I ever had was at a truck stop on the way to
Banff. It was wonderful! They make awesome dry wines from berries in
Newfoundland, too, and while we are talking about wine, let's not forget
the Ice Wine from the Niagara area.

Toronto has an excellent China Town and we've eaten there several times
while visiting. Vancouver's China Town has the best dim sum in the
West---bar none!

The sourdough bread in Whitehorse is legendary as are the pancakes they
make up there with sourdough starter.

There is lots of good food in Canada, but the brown gravy on the French
fries is not my idea of cuisine or even acceptable food.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.


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Old 04-06-2009, 07:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Thu, 4 Jun 2009 07:39:21 -0700 (PDT), John Kane
wrote:

On Jun 4, 12:53*am, Lynn from Fargo wrote:
North Dakota is "muy circa de Canada". *Minot, where I was born, is
about 100 miles from the Canadian border. *Now you have to have a
passport to cross the border. *Not the border INTO Canada, but the
border to get back into the United States.

We used to go to Lake Metigoshe and cross into Canada on the lake. *We
could buy candy and sweets at a teeny little store. *Best was
MacIntosh Toffee. It came in a flat red cardboard box and it was a
slab of real toffee - not breakable (unless it was cold) you had to
bite it off. *It was really hard on your teeth - removed fillings.
Eating it took patience. *We also bought Humbugs. *They were a hard
brown peppermint dusted with castor sugar. *I think they may have had
horehound in them. *They were wonderful on a sore throat.

When my dad would go fishing in Canada or cross the border for work
(he was a Law Enforcement Officer) he would bring bak great big cans
of Empress jams and preserves. *Raspberry was my favorite, but
Strawberry was his. Once we got blueberry, but mostly it was
strawberry preserves with whole strawberries in the jam. He made bread
almost every weekend that he was home. *Always white bread, his
mother's recipe. Still warm and sliced an inch thick with real butter
it was heaven with that jam!

After I was married and could go to Winnipeg, we would bring back a
dozen or so fat round unsliced loaves of "City Rye Bread" - some with
caraway, some without. *It was dark brown, slightly sweet and chewy
with a wonderful shiny crust. I think it was something about the
water. *They used to sell it at the airport.

Canadian cheddar cheese - extra extra sharp in big wedges. *And Keen's
dry English Mustard and huge sweet *Australian raisins . . .

Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. *Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. *Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


Amazing, I hadn't realised that one couldn't get MacIntosh Toffee or
humbugs in the States. Did you ever try the 'black balls" (3 for a
penny when I was a kid) that variety stores used to sell. Black outer
coating with a hard white interior.


(snip)

Gobstoppers?

I have a weakness for Rowntrees Fruit Pastilles, but I can only get
them by mail-order or in some specialty import shops.

Businesses won't ship in the summer months, either, because of heat
damage. All my supplier had last January were the tubes of all black
currant -which I happen to love, so I got twenty tubes.

Other favorites: Black Magic chocolates.....

"Violet Crumble"!! (Time for a new thread?)

;-)
--
mad
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Old 04-06-2009, 07:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

Dave Smith wrote:

One of our sweet treats that I am surprised never seems to have caught
on in the US is butter tarts. And then there is Nanaimo bars. Like
butter tarts,one is not enough and two is one too many.


You've got a butter tart fan right here! I like Nanaimo bars, too, but
butter tarts better.


--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 04-06-2009, 08:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Thu, 04 Jun 2009 13:03:36 -0500, Janet Wilder
wrote:

Lynn from Fargo wrote:

Canada - Our Good Neighbor to the North. Responsible for my diabetes,
cholesterol level and dental problems. Gotta love 'em!
Lynn in Fargo


The Red Rose brand tea they sell in Canada is far superior to the same
brand they sell here in the US. The Canadian brand is much stronger.
It's the only tea that I will consider putting milk in. Without milk it
jangles my teeth.

I am a huge fan of butter tarts. The plain ones not the wannabee pecan
pie ones. I also love a bag of Tim Bits from Tim Horton's but I
understand they have franchises in the US now.

The very first bison burger I ever had was at a truck stop on the way to
Banff. It was wonderful! They make awesome dry wines from berries in
Newfoundland, too, and while we are talking about wine, let's not forget
the Ice Wine from the Niagara area.

Toronto has an excellent China Town and we've eaten there several times
while visiting. Vancouver's China Town has the best dim sum in the
West---bar none!

The sourdough bread in Whitehorse is legendary as are the pancakes they
make up there with sourdough starter.

There is lots of good food in Canada, but the brown gravy on the French
fries is not my idea of cuisine or even acceptable food.


That's ok, you don't have to eat it...we like it..
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2009, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Canadian treats that I loved and grew up on . . .

On Thu, 04 Jun 2009 13:29:01 -0600, Puester
wrote:

wrote:


Butter Tart Pie

3 Eggs
3/4 c Brown sugar -- packed
3/4 c Corn syrup
3 tb Butter -- melted
4 ts Flour -- all purpose
1 1/2 ts Vanilla
1/4 ts -salt
2 1/4 c Currants or raisins
1 Pie shell, 9", unbaked



This version of butter tarts (a Canadian speciality) is easier to
prepare than the traditional individual tarts. It is very rich and
best served in small pieces.

Source: Canadian Living Magazine



That sounds very,very similar to pecan pie with raisins
instead of the nuts.
If you like raisins (I don't), I'm sure it's a winner.

gloria p


Kath's mother also makes it with oatmeal, man that's a sweet
pie....thens there's the ice cream for the top


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