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Old 02-03-2009, 02:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

On Mar 1, 4:34*pm, Omelet wrote:
In article ,
*"Michael \"Dog3\"" wrote:



Here's Martha's list, you're right about the beets:


Deep Gold: Boil eggs in turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Sienna: Boil eggs in onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.
Dark, Rich Brown: Boil eggs in black coffee, 30 minutes.
Pale Yellow: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30
minutes. Orange: Soak eggs in room-temperature onion-skin solution, 30
minutes. Light Brown: Soak eggs in room-temperature black coffee, 30
minutes. Light Pink: Soak eggs in room-temperature beet solution, 30
minutes. Light Blue: Soak eggs in room-temperature cabbage solution,
30 minutes. Royal Blue: Soak eggs in room-temperature cabbage solution
overnight. Lavender: Soak eggs in room-temperature beet solution, 30
minutes. Follow with room-temperature cabbage solution, 30 seconds.
Chartreuse: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30
minutes. Follow with room-temperature cabbage solution, 5 seconds.
Salmon: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Follow with room-temperature onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.


As cool as this all sounds I have to ask myself if I would even bother.
At this point I'll say nah. *I just don't have any reason to go to all
that trouble. *I will say the royal blue and the salmon colors sound
pretty nifty


Michael


If you have no children to share this with, then I'd say no, no reason
to bother. *I have nephews. :-)


Oh heavens! It's fun. no reason to waste it all on the youngg.

maxine in ri

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Old 02-03-2009, 03:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article
,
Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:

On Mar 1, 3:54*pm, Omelet wrote:
In article
,

*bulka wrote:
On Mar 1, 11:57 am, Arri London wrote:


Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before


Dammit people! *We don't eat as much here as I want to cook as it is.
Now I've got to make tea eggs. *Jeeze!


B


grins Pastorio used to serve those at some of his fancier buffets. :-) *
I've not tried making them yet.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not
judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

==================================
I made those once for a Passover seder. They had anise in the water
and vinegar other things. You broke the shells after they were hard
boiled in tea and stuff and soaked them in another "pickling" liquid.
Gorgeous - like Italian marble.
Lynn in Fargo
Used to get pale blue and green and beige chicken eggs from a farmer
friend. Wish I'd blown the shells.


Aracauna eggs. Those were some of my favorite chickens back when I had
poultry. :-) The pale blue-green eggshells were also interesting when
onion skin dyed.

I'll have to try those tea eggs next time I'm assigned a potluck dish.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article ,
Joseph Littleshoes wrote:

Omelet wrote:

Joseph Littleshoes wrote:



A variation is to paint a
design in wax on the egg, dye it a black, remove the wax design with hot
water and then re dye so the design shows in a bright color against the
black. And on top of which, this is usually done to the emptied egg
shell. So all very delicate to produce.
--
JL



See above.


With those really big shells, ostrich or even goose one can get really
fancy.

From painted colors in inks, or oils, or acrylics and add fabrics and
ribbons and little glass gems

Or real precious and semi precious stones, gold and silver threads....


There are lists dedicated to egg decorating. I still have a bunch of
(clean blown) emu shells stored in the shed. I used to sell them on
ebay. I'll probably eventually sell what is left on Craig's list, or
decorate a few myself. I have a few Ostrich shells stashed somewhere
too.


I actually have a mold for a hollow egg me mum made sugar eggs with for
easter, decorated them with various piped butter creams and made a
little scene with the nativity or some such image in side them, with a
little hole you could look through to see the inside.


So cool. :-)


But the egg is made of a sugar 'slurry' i cant think of a better term
(sugar 'slip'?) for it, not cooked iirc, a very thick sugar and water
mix that was allowed to harden over several days in a warm spot so that
when unmolded it had a very solid consistency.

And she would turn them into several little works of art in sugar and
give them away, eventually we kids would contrive to eat them.
--
JL


I saw some of those many, many years ago, but not for awhile.

I've seen some amazing egg art from Ostrich, emu, Rhea, goose and duck
shells!
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article
,
maxine wrote:

On Mar 1, 3:33*am, Omelet wrote:
I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) *I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews. *
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?


I use onion skins all the time to differentiate my boiled from raw
eggs (DH has a real problem telling the difference--and yes, he knows
about spinning). I just save up the skins for a week or so, put them
in the bottom of the pot, put the eggs on top and cover with water.
Bring to a boil, let sit, and then quick-chill. Lovely yellow eggs.


But that won't "pattern" them like wrapping them will. :-)


Tea bags will give the eggs a taupe color. Saffron does not give the
shells any color. (at least, not the amount I'm willing to toss in).
Beets will give you a lovely pale pink. Add some baking soda to the
water and they'll turn blue.

maxine in ri


Blue with beet juice? I'll have to try that. How much baking soda to
how much water please?
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article
,
maxine wrote:

If you have no children to share this with, then I'd say no, no reason
to bother. *I have nephews. :-)


Oh heavens! It's fun. no reason to waste it all on the youngg.

maxine in ri


If you enjoy doing it for yourself, go for it. g
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama


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Old 02-03-2009, 04:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)



Omelet wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Omelet wrote:

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews.
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?
--


Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before
simmering in the tea/soy sauce/spices mix. The eggs come out marbled,
rather than the shells.


They tend to leak thru the shell anyway. g That kind of thing is fun
for party deviled eggs.


Ever try your method with red onion skins? Just curious.


A bit. They don't come out as heavily colored.


Interesting.



The colours of eggs dyed with red cabbage can be manipulated to some
extent. Vinegar (acid) will keep it redder, more neutral solutions keeps
it purple, baking soda (alkaline) will turn it greener. No idea what an
egg steeped in baking soda would taste like, however LOL.


laughs The flavor of the onion skins DOES leak into the eggs. It's
rather pleasant. :-d
--



Then maybe skip the baking soda one, yes?
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Old 02-03-2009, 04:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)



bulka wrote:

On Mar 1, 11:57 am, Arri London wrote:

Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before


Dammit people! We don't eat as much here as I want to cook as it is.
Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!

B



LOL sorry. They are one of my favourite snacks.
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Old 02-03-2009, 04:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)



Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:

On Mar 1, 3:54 pm, Omelet wrote:
In article
,

bulka wrote:
On Mar 1, 11:57 am, Arri London wrote:


Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before


Dammit people! We don't eat as much here as I want to cook as it is.
Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


B


grins Pastorio used to serve those at some of his fancier buffets. :-)
I've not tried making them yet.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

==================================
I made those once for a Passover seder. They had anise in the water
and vinegar other things. You broke the shells after they were hard
boiled in tea and stuff and soaked them in another "pickling" liquid.
Gorgeous - like Italian marble.
Lynn in Fargo
Used to get pale blue and green and beige chicken eggs from a farmer
friend. Wish I'd blown the shells.



Now that's a different sort of tea egg. Have never made them with
vinegar and never pickled them after.
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Old 02-03-2009, 06:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Omelet wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Omelet wrote:

I've not made onion skin eggs since mom passed away. She's the one that
taught me that trick. :-) I'm currently saving the "paper" onion skins
that it takes to do it as I want to teach the method to my nephews.
I'll be sure to take pics this year.

Wrap raw eggs in dry onion skins, bind with cheese cloth and cotton
string.

Hard boil.

Unwrap, let cool and coat lightly with some cooking oil.

They really are quite lovely.
I'll try to take pics this year if I actually do it. It'll depend on the
babysitting schedule...

Anyone else use "natural" dyes for doing Easter Eggs?
--

Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before
simmering in the tea/soy sauce/spices mix. The eggs come out marbled,
rather than the shells.


They tend to leak thru the shell anyway. g That kind of thing is fun
for party deviled eggs.


Ever try your method with red onion skins? Just curious.


A bit. They don't come out as heavily colored.


Interesting.



The colours of eggs dyed with red cabbage can be manipulated to some
extent. Vinegar (acid) will keep it redder, more neutral solutions keeps
it purple, baking soda (alkaline) will turn it greener. No idea what an
egg steeped in baking soda would taste like, however LOL.


laughs The flavor of the onion skins DOES leak into the eggs. It's
rather pleasant. :-d
--



Then maybe skip the baking soda one, yes?


I've not tried that so I cannot say. :-)

Someone posted that beet juice will make blue eggs if I add soda.
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 02-03-2009, 06:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

On Mar 1, 10:32 pm, Arri London wrote:
bulka wrote:

On Mar 1, 11:57 am, Arri London wrote:


Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before


Dammit people! We don't eat as much here as I want to cook as it is.
Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


B


LOL sorry. They are one of my favourite snacks.


There are just a few soaking. I think I did this once a hundred years
ago. Family members don't get it , but I'm looking forward to a snack
Monday.

Thanks for the reminder, Arri.

B



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Old 02-03-2009, 09:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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bulka wrote:

Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


Fortunately, they're pretty easy to make. Reading over this thread, I'm
wondering about how well red wine would work instead of tea in that
application. Say, red wine, star anise, stick cinnamon, and orange peel?

Bob



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Old 02-03-2009, 09:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

bulka wrote:

Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


Fortunately, they're pretty easy to make. Reading over this thread, I'm
wondering about how well red wine would work instead of tea in that
application. Say, red wine, star anise, stick cinnamon, and orange peel?

Bob


Y'know, that is a seriously awesome idea. :-) And makes me more glad
than ever that I started this thread for different views...
--
Peace! Om

I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama
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Old 03-03-2009, 01:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)



bulka wrote:

On Mar 1, 10:32 pm, Arri London wrote:
bulka wrote:

On Mar 1, 11:57 am, Arri London wrote:


Does making 'tea eggs' count? The shells need to be cracked before


Dammit people! We don't eat as much here as I want to cook as it is.
Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


B


LOL sorry. They are one of my favourite snacks.


There are just a few soaking. I think I did this once a hundred years
ago. Family members don't get it , but I'm looking forward to a snack
Monday.

Thanks for the reminder, Arri.

B


YVW. Always glad to help out another aficionado
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Old 03-03-2009, 01:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Omelet wrote:

In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

bulka wrote:

Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


Fortunately, they're pretty easy to make. Reading over this thread, I'm
wondering about how well red wine would work instead of tea in that
application. Say, red wine, star anise, stick cinnamon, and orange peel?

Bob


Y'know, that is a seriously awesome idea. :-) And makes me more glad
than ever that I started this thread for different views...
--



The eggs would likely end up tasting like mulled wine. Could work. Would
look nice.
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Old 03-03-2009, 09:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Easter cometh (natural Easter egg dying)

On Mar 2, 7:13 pm, Arri London wrote:
Omelet wrote:

In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:


bulka wrote:


Now I've got to make tea eggs. Jeeze!


Fortunately, they're pretty easy to make. Reading over this thread, I'm
wondering about how well red wine would work instead of tea in that
application. Say, red wine, star anise, stick cinnamon, and orange peel?


Bob


Y'know, that is a seriously awesome idea. :-) And makes me more glad
than ever that I started this thread for different views...
--


The eggs would likely end up tasting like mulled wine. Could work. Would
look nice.


My first attempt at tea eggs was - interesting. Very mottled, some
cracks.

More subltle flavor and less penetration than I had imagined. Good,
though. Between boiling them enough to crack the shell, and thinking
I needed a hot marinade, may have been a little overcooked.

Working on the mulled wine eggs now. Gonna try to craze the shells at
the earliest possible moment. Just heat the wine and spices and let
it steep.

B


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