General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 02:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was on
Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite relieved
when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for Thanksgiving. Oh thank
bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area chain. They
offered their regular menu but also had a few "specials" for Thanksgiving.
I really don't like turkey but I knew they were also offering roasted pork
loin. Okay, I can live with that But when we got there they'd added
another "special" to the menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think when they
became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death in every
possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan seared. It almost seemed to have
some sort of glaze on it. It was crispy outside (but no sort of breading
shudder) and fork tender and juicy inside.

They also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce! Both the salmon and the shrimp were topped with a lovely herbed
cream sauce, served on a bed of rice. But hey, this is the south. I also
had to select two side dishes (and no, macaroni & cheese wasn't one of them
LOL). I chose broccoli casserole and spinach. It never occurred to me I'd
get a double whammy of rice since broccoli casserole, which I've made many
times in the past, also contains rice. But no matter. I couldn't eat half
of my dinner anyway. So I gasp asked for a to-go box.

This place routinely places a basket of bread on the table. It includes
delicious pumpkin bread which tastes a lot like gingerbread to me. Also
jalapeno cornbread and huge whole wheat rolls.

Anyway, it was a very good, albeit rather odd, Thanksgiving meal. I
couldn't quite identify what herbs were in that cream sauce. I've made
basil cream sauces in the past but this wasn't basil. And not quite strong
enough to be tarragon. Since technically I'm from out of town I plan to
call the restaurant just before they open for lunch today to see if I can
get the recipe for that salmon/shrimp & sauce. All they can do is say no.
And sometimes, if you ask nicely, they will actually give you their recipes.

Hope everyone who celebrated Thanksgiving yesterday had a wonderful day.
And thank you all for your kind words after my mother's death. They are
much appreciated.

Jill


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 05:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 599
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was on
Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite relieved
when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for Thanksgiving. Oh thank
bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area chain. They
offered their regular menu but also had a few "specials" for Thanksgiving.
I really don't like turkey but I knew they were also offering roasted pork
loin. Okay, I can live with that But when we got there they'd added
another "special" to the menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think when they
became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death in every
possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan seared. It almost seemed to have
some sort of glaze on it. It was crispy outside (but no sort of breading
shudder) and fork tender and juicy inside.

They also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce! Both the salmon and the shrimp were topped with a lovely herbed
cream sauce, served on a bed of rice. But hey, this is the south. I also
had to select two side dishes (and no, macaroni & cheese wasn't one of them
LOL). I chose broccoli casserole and spinach. It never occurred to me I'd
get a double whammy of rice since broccoli casserole, which I've made many
times in the past, also contains rice. But no matter. I couldn't eat half
of my dinner anyway. So I gasp asked for a to-go box.

This place routinely places a basket of bread on the table. It includes
delicious pumpkin bread which tastes a lot like gingerbread to me. Also
jalapeno cornbread and huge whole wheat rolls.

Anyway, it was a very good, albeit rather odd, Thanksgiving meal. I
couldn't quite identify what herbs were in that cream sauce. I've made
basil cream sauces in the past but this wasn't basil. And not quite strong
enough to be tarragon. Since technically I'm from out of town I plan to
call the restaurant just before they open for lunch today to see if I can
get the recipe for that salmon/shrimp & sauce. All they can do is say no.
And sometimes, if you ask nicely, they will actually give you their recipes.

Hope everyone who celebrated Thanksgiving yesterday had a wonderful day.
And thank you all for your kind words after my mother's death. They are
much appreciated.

Jill


The salmon sounds similar to what we make on the grill. The high
temperature gives it the crispy exterior, along with the glaze (in our
case, a 1:1 mixture of maple syrup and soy sauce).

The original Thanksgiving feast included wild game (venison and fowl)
and seafood, so you weren't too far off. Having Tofurky would be
another story entirely.

Cindy, wondering what her Pilgrim ancestors would have thought of
Tofurky...

--
C.J. Fuller

Delete the obvious to email me
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 07:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

Cindy Fuller wrote:
In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was
on Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite
relieved when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for
Thanksgiving. Oh thank bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area
chain. They offered their regular menu but also had a few
"specials" for Thanksgiving. I really don't like turkey but I knew
they were also offering roasted pork loin. Okay, I can live with
that But when we got there they'd added another "special" to the
menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think when
they became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death
in every possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan seared. It
almost seemed to have some sort of glaze on it. It was crispy
outside (but no sort of breading shudder) and fork tender and
juicy inside.

The salmon sounds similar to what we make on the grill. The high
temperature gives it the crispy exterior, along with the glaze (in our
case, a 1:1 mixture of maple syrup and soy sauce).

The original Thanksgiving feast included wild game (venison and fowl)
and seafood, so you weren't too far off. Having Tofurky would be
another story entirely.

Cindy, wondering what her Pilgrim ancestors would have thought of
Tofurky...


Tofu isn't turkey. Tofu isn't beef. Tofu isn't anything. But feel free to
pretend it is!

Maple glaze might have factored into the glaze for the salmon although I
didn't taste anything maple. I'm in South Carolina so maybe it was Karo
corn syrup. Just a light brushing.

I was more interested in the herbed cream sauce. I called the restaurant
and they offered to sell me their cookbook. Um, no thanks, I am not buying
a cook book.

Most of this restaurants food is middle of the road southern U.S fare even
though we are in the Carolina "Low Country". I already know how to make
she-crab soup, broccoli or squash casserole, green bean casserole, mustard
or turnip greens, etc. CFS with cream gravy. I know how to make red beans
& rice. This is pretty ordinary southern fare. It was just the shrimp and
salmon that was really good. And sorry, I'm not going to buy a $30
cookbook. It's not that important.

Jill

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 08:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,055
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

jmcquown wrote:

Hope everyone who celebrated Thanksgiving yesterday had a wonderful day.
And thank you all for your kind words after my mother's death. They are
much appreciated.


http://www.basicinstructions.net/200...ndolences.html
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 10:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,409
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

jmcquown wrote:

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was on
Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite relieved
when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for Thanksgiving. Oh thank
bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area chain. They
offered their regular menu but also had a few "specials" for Thanksgiving.
I really don't like turkey but I knew they were also offering roasted pork
loin. Okay, I can live with that But when we got there they'd added
another "special" to the menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think when they
became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death in every
possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan seared. It almost seemed to have
some sort of glaze on it. It was crispy outside (but no sort of breading
shudder) and fork tender and juicy inside.

They also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce! Both the salmon and the shrimp were topped with a lovely herbed
cream sauce, served on a bed of rice. But hey, this is the south. I also
had to select two side dishes (and no, macaroni & cheese wasn't one of them
LOL). I chose broccoli casserole and spinach. It never occurred to me I'd
get a double whammy of rice since broccoli casserole, which I've made many
times in the past, also contains rice. But no matter. I couldn't eat half
of my dinner anyway. So I gasp asked for a to-go box.

This place routinely places a basket of bread on the table. It includes
delicious pumpkin bread which tastes a lot like gingerbread to me. Also
jalapeno cornbread and huge whole wheat rolls.

Anyway, it was a very good, albeit rather odd, Thanksgiving meal. I
couldn't quite identify what herbs were in that cream sauce. I've made
basil cream sauces in the past but this wasn't basil. And not quite strong
enough to be tarragon. Since technically I'm from out of town I plan to
call the restaurant just before they open for lunch today to see if I can
get the recipe for that salmon/shrimp & sauce. All they can do is say no.
And sometimes, if you ask nicely, they will actually give you their recipes.


Odd? I made liver and onions.


--
Blinky
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 932
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

On Nov 28, 3:29*pm, Blinky the Shark wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was on
Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite relieved
when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for Thanksgiving. *Oh thank
bast, I don't have to cook!


My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area chain. *They
offered their regular menu but also had a few "specials" for Thanksgiving.
I really don't like turkey but I knew they were also offering roasted pork
loin. *Okay, I can live with that *But when we got there they'd added
another "special" to the menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". *I ordered that.


I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. *(I think when they
became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death in every
possible restaurant.) *The salmon was pan seared. *It almost seemed to have
some sort of glaze on it. *It was crispy outside (but no sort of breading
shudder) and fork tender and juicy inside.


They also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce! *Both the salmon and the shrimp were topped with a lovely herbed
cream sauce, served on a bed of rice. *But hey, this is the south. *I also
had to select two side dishes (and no, macaroni & cheese wasn't one of them
LOL). *I chose broccoli casserole and spinach. *It never occurred to me I'd
get a double whammy of rice since broccoli casserole, which I've made many
times in the past, also contains rice. *But no matter. *I couldn't eat half
of my dinner anyway. *So I gasp asked for a to-go box.


This place routinely places a basket of bread on the table. *It includes
delicious pumpkin bread which tastes a lot like gingerbread to me. *Also
jalapeno cornbread and huge whole wheat rolls.


Anyway, it was a very good, albeit rather odd, Thanksgiving meal. *I
couldn't quite identify what herbs were in that cream sauce. *I've made
basil cream sauces in the past but this wasn't basil. *And not quite strong
enough to be tarragon. *Since technically I'm from out of town I plan to
call the restaurant just before they open for lunch today to see if I can
get the recipe for that salmon/shrimp & sauce. *All they can do is say no.
And sometimes, if you ask nicely, they will actually give you their recipes.


Odd? *I made liver and onions. *

--
Blinky
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project:http://improve-usenet.org
Need a new news feed? *http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


Oh Wow! There's not much in this world that I like better than
scratch ,ashed potatoes and good turkey gravy . . . except liver and
onions (cooked in bacon fat).
Lynn in Fargo
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 11,454
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal


"Julian Vrieslander" wrote in
message
...
In article

,
Cindy Fuller wrote:

The salmon sounds similar to what we make on the grill. The high
temperature gives it the crispy exterior, along with the glaze (in our
case, a 1:1 mixture of maple syrup and soy sauce).


That would be rather salty, dear. I'm usually the one mixing this stuff
up, and I'm probably doing 3:1 or 2:1. And sometimes with a bit of
minced fresh ginger.


Reduced sodium soy!


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 224
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

On Nov 28, 8:08 am, "jmcquown" wrote:

also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce!


Would you please elaborate on this.





  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 11:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 11,612
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

jmcquown wrote:
Cindy Fuller wrote:
In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was
on Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite
relieved when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for
Thanksgiving. Oh thank bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area
chain. They offered their regular menu but also had a few
"specials" for Thanksgiving. I really don't like turkey but I knew
they were also offering roasted pork loin. Okay, I can live with
that But when we got there they'd added another "special" to the
menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think when
they became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death
in every possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan seared. It
almost seemed to have some sort of glaze on it. It was crispy
outside (but no sort of breading shudder) and fork tender and
juicy inside.

The salmon sounds similar to what we make on the grill. The high
temperature gives it the crispy exterior, along with the glaze (in our
case, a 1:1 mixture of maple syrup and soy sauce).

The original Thanksgiving feast included wild game (venison and fowl)
and seafood, so you weren't too far off. Having Tofurky would be
another story entirely.

Cindy, wondering what her Pilgrim ancestors would have thought of
Tofurky...


Tofu isn't turkey. Tofu isn't beef. Tofu isn't anything. But feel
free to pretend it is!

Maple glaze might have factored into the glaze for the salmon although
I didn't taste anything maple. I'm in South Carolina so maybe it was
Karo corn syrup. Just a light brushing.

I was more interested in the herbed cream sauce. I called the
restaurant and they offered to sell me their cookbook. Um, no thanks, I
am not buying a cook book.

Most of this restaurants food is middle of the road southern U.S fare
even though we are in the Carolina "Low Country". I already know how to
make she-crab soup, broccoli or squash casserole, green bean casserole,
mustard or turnip greens, etc. CFS with cream gravy. I know how to
make red beans & rice. This is pretty ordinary southern fare. It was
just the shrimp and salmon that was really good. And sorry, I'm not
going to buy a $30 cookbook. It's not that important.

Jill


Maybe it is in the library or a local bookstore (where you could
take a peek).

--
Jean B.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 11:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 82
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

On Nov 28, 3:51*pm, "jmcquown" wrote:
Julian Vrieslander wrote:
In article

,
Cindy Fuller wrote:


The salmon sounds similar to what we make on the grill. *The high
temperature gives it the crispy exterior, along with the glaze (in
our case, a 1:1 mixture of maple syrup and soy sauce).


That would be rather salty, dear. *I'm usually the one mixing this
stuff up, and I'm probably doing 3:1 or 2:1. *And sometimes with a
bit of minced fresh ginger.


[So says Cindy's infamous SO]


But what's in the herb sauce? *The shrimp were grilled, certainly. *It's the
herbed cream sauce I was actually interested in. *It wasn't a basil cream
sauce, it wasn't tarragon in the sauce. *I can't quite place it.

I called the restaurant and they said "If you want to buy our cookbook..."
Why would I want to buy their $30 cookbook for one item I liked that was
only on the Thanksgiving menu? *I've got enough cookbooks at home, assuming
I ever get back there. LOL

Jill



I'm betting since they didn't eat the shrimp dish you describe, they
don't know what's in it.
However, did it ever occur to you to see if the book is at the
library???
You could easily look at the book for free, and copy the recipe down
if its in there.
Or you could go back there and see if the recipe is in the book for
the dish you're looking for and peek at the ingredients.
There are ways you can obtain the recipe if you think about it.
I suspect you prefer to just whine about it here though.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-11-2008, 11:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

val189 wrote:
On Nov 28, 8:08 am, "jmcquown" wrote:

also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce!


Would you please elaborate on this.



Pretty simple, val. "shrimp scampi" is a misnomer. "Scampi" means shrimp.
Shrimp scampi translates to "shrimp shrimp" when you get literal about it.
To a lot of people it means shrimp in butter and garlic sauce because that's
what many restaurant menus call "scampi". Not that there's anything wrong
with that

In this case it was seared shrimp served with a wonderful herbed cream sauce
on top of a bed of rice It was delicious.

Jill

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-11-2008, 12:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 36,804
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

Jean B. wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
Cindy Fuller wrote:
In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was
on Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite
relieved when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for
Thanksgiving. Oh thank bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area
chain. They offered their regular menu but also had a few
"specials" for Thanksgiving. I really don't like turkey but I knew
they were also offering roasted pork loin. Okay, I can live with
that But when we got there they'd added another "special" to
the menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think
when they became really popular some 15 years ago they were done
to death in every possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan
seared. It almost seemed to have some sort of glaze on it. It
was crispy outside (but no sort of breading shudder) and fork
tender and juicy inside.

The salmon sounds similar to what we make on the grill. The high
temperature gives it the crispy exterior, along with the glaze (in
our case, a 1:1 mixture of maple syrup and soy sauce).

The original Thanksgiving feast included wild game (venison and
fowl) and seafood, so you weren't too far off. Having Tofurky
would be another story entirely.

Cindy, wondering what her Pilgrim ancestors would have thought of
Tofurky...


Tofu isn't turkey. Tofu isn't beef. Tofu isn't anything. But feel
free to pretend it is!

Maple glaze might have factored into the glaze for the salmon although I
didn't taste anything maple. I'm in South Carolina so
maybe it was Karo corn syrup. Just a light brushing.

I was more interested in the herbed cream sauce. I called the
restaurant and they offered to sell me their cookbook. Um, no
thanks, I am not buying a cook book.

Most of this restaurants food is middle of the road southern U.S fare
even though we are in the Carolina "Low Country". I already know
how to make she-crab soup, broccoli or squash casserole, green bean
casserole, mustard or turnip greens, etc. CFS with cream gravy. I
know how to make red beans & rice. This is pretty ordinary southern
fare. It was just the shrimp and salmon that was really good. And
sorry, I'm not going to buy a $30 cookbook. It's not that important.

Jill


Maybe it is in the library or a local bookstore (where you could
take a peek).


Heh, if you can find a bookstore with this cookbook (or a library for that
matter) within 20 miles of where I am I'll eat one of Mom's 1940's felt hats
I found a treasure trove of felt hats LOL

It's a cream herb sauce... can't be that difficult. Getting decent fresh
shrimp back in Memphis, now *that* will be difficult

Jill

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-11-2008, 12:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,744
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal


"Blinky the Shark" wrote in message
news
jmcquown wrote:

With everything that has been going on this week (Mom's funeral was on
Tuesday, had to meet with her attorney on Thursday) I was quite relieved
when my middle-brother suggested we eat out for Thanksgiving. Oh thank
bast, I don't have to cook!

My brothers and I went to Barbara Jeans, which is a local area chain.
They
offered their regular menu but also had a few "specials" for
Thanksgiving.
I really don't like turkey but I knew they were also offering roasted
pork
loin. Okay, I can live with that But when we got there they'd added
another "special" to the menu: salmon & shrimp "scampi". I ordered that.

I'm not normally a big fan of salmon fillets, either. (I think when they
became really popular some 15 years ago they were done to death in every
possible restaurant.) The salmon was pan seared. It almost seemed to
have
some sort of glaze on it. It was crispy outside (but no sort of breading
shudder) and fork tender and juicy inside.

They also seemed to know "scampi" doesn't mean shrimp in butter/garlic
sauce! Both the salmon and the shrimp were topped with a lovely herbed
cream sauce, served on a bed of rice. But hey, this is the south. I
also
had to select two side dishes (and no, macaroni & cheese wasn't one of
them
LOL). I chose broccoli casserole and spinach. It never occurred to me
I'd
get a double whammy of rice since broccoli casserole, which I've made
many
times in the past, also contains rice. But no matter. I couldn't eat
half
of my dinner anyway. So I gasp asked for a to-go box.

This place routinely places a basket of bread on the table. It includes
delicious pumpkin bread which tastes a lot like gingerbread to me. Also
jalapeno cornbread and huge whole wheat rolls.

Anyway, it was a very good, albeit rather odd, Thanksgiving meal. I
couldn't quite identify what herbs were in that cream sauce. I've made
basil cream sauces in the past but this wasn't basil. And not quite
strong
enough to be tarragon. Since technically I'm from out of town I plan to
call the restaurant just before they open for lunch today to see if I can
get the recipe for that salmon/shrimp & sauce. All they can do is say
no.
And sometimes, if you ask nicely, they will actually give you their
recipes.


Odd? I made liver and onions.



I made creamy smooth polenta, cooked with butter, garlic, stock, milk and
thyme. Cut into wedges, dredged in flour and fried.
Italian spinach cooked with olive oil, garlic parmesan and bread crumbs - so
delightful with the polenta served on top
roasted portabella mushroom caps filled with humus topped with caramelized
sweet onion and feta cheese
roast honey glazed ham (for me the only carnivore present)
home made refrigerator dinner rolls (had to do something traditional)
pumpkin pudding served with whipped cream laced with cognac

Not traditional but a huge hit.

Paul


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-11-2008, 12:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 547
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

Lynn from Fargo wrote:
On Nov 28, 3:29 pm, Blinky the Shark wrote:


Odd? I made liver and onions.

--
Blinky
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project:http://improve-usenet.org
Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


Oh Wow! There's not much in this world that I like better than
scratch ,ashed potatoes and good turkey gravy . . . except liver and
onions (cooked in bacon fat).
Lynn in Fargo



Liver & onions cooked in bacon fat. Oh, baby... sigh Bacon fat rules!


Becca
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-11-2008, 12:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 249
Default A Rather Odd Thanksgiving Meal

"jmcquown" wrote in
:


Pretty simple, val. "shrimp scampi" is a misnomer. "Scampi" means
shrimp. Shrimp scampi translates to "shrimp shrimp" when you get
literal about it. To a lot of people it means shrimp in butter and
garlic sauce because that's what many restaurant menus call "scampi".
Not that there's anything wrong with that



Scampi has always been 'small lobster'..... like the Pommy langoustine, or
our Marron/Freshwater cray.

Shrimp=prawn.

Shrimp/prawns in butter and garlic, is Garlic Prawns/shrimp.


But on closer checking.......... we see that the US (*and* the Poms) have
*******ised the terms to suit themselves.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scampi

Scampi is a culinary term that is alternately used for a species of lobster
or a method of preparing seafood.

The particular lobster referred to as scampi is the Norway lobster
(Nephrops norvegicus). This lobster is also known—especially in Ireland and
the United Kingdom—as the Dublin Bay Prawn. The French term is langoustine.
[1] It is the plural of Italian scampo, but that form is rarely used in
English. The name is used loosely both in Italy and elsewhere to refer to
other similar species, though some food labelling laws (in Britain, for
example) define "scampi" as Nephrops norvegicus.

The fleshy tail of the Norway lobster is closer in both taste and texture
to lobster and crayfish than prawn or shrimp.

In both the United Kingdom and USA the word has come to define the method
of preparation rather than the ingredient, although referring to quite
different methods in the two countries.

In the United Kingdom, "scampi" refers to a dish of shelled tail meat
coated in breadcrumbs or batter, deep fried, and often served with chips,
peas and Tartar sauce.[1] In the Southern Hemisphere, other species of
lobster are used instead, such as Metanephrops challengeri.

In the USA, "scampi" is often the menu name for shrimp in Italian-American
cuisine. The term "Scampi", by itself, is also the name of a dish of shrimp
served in garlic butter and dry white wine, served either with bread, or
over pasta. The word "scampi" is often construed as that style of
preparation rather than an ingredient, with that preparation being called
"shrimp scampi", and with variants such as "chicken scampi".



Scampi recipe......

http://www.abc.net.au/local/recipes/...30/1087284.htm



--
Peter Lucas
Brisbane
Australia

I was having dinner with my boss and his wife and she said to me, "How

many potatoes would you like Peter?". I said "Ooh, I'll just have one

please". She said "It's OK, you don?t have to be polite" "Alright" I

said "I'll just have one then, you stupid cow".


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thanksgiving meal. Julie Bove[_2_] Diabetic 34 18-11-2012 04:13 AM
Thanksgiving meal piedmont Barbecue 8 01-12-2009 07:31 PM
Our Thanksgiving meal :) Arri London General Cooking 24 29-11-2008 05:33 AM
Integrate a Few New Superfoods into Thanksgiving Meal Planning? DGJ General Cooking 11 12-11-2007 11:05 PM
Thanksgiving meal mostly original Amerindian stuff Wayne Lundberg Mexican Cooking 25 29-11-2006 06:38 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:33 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017