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Old 16-11-2008, 11:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

Driving and Car Maintenance Transportation accounts for 66% of U.S.
oil use -mainly in the form of gasoline. Luckily, there are plenty of
ways to improve gas mileage.

Driving Tips:- Idling gets you 0 miles per gallon. The best way to
warm up a vehicle is to drive it. No more than 30 seconds of idling
on
winter days is needed. Anything more simply wastes fuel and increases
emissions.- Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration, and
hard
braking) wastes gas. It can lower your highway gas mileage 33% and
city mileage 5%. Drive at lowest and constant rpms; 2000 rpm are
enough; you can save up to 30%. Even a Porsche can be driven at the
4th gear at 20 mph and at the 6th gear at 50 mph with 2.5 times less
fuel consumption.- Avoid high speeds. Driving 75 mph, rather than 65
mph, could cut your fuel economy by 15%.- When you use overdrive
gearing, your cars engine speed goes down. This saves gas and reduces
wear.- Use air conditioning only when necessary.- Clear out your car;
extra weight decreases gas mileage. Each 60 pounds increases fuel
consumption by 10%. - Reduce drag by placing items inside
the car or trunk rather than on roof racks. A roof rack or carrier
provides additional cargo space and may allow you to buy a smaller
car. However, a loaded roof rack can decrease your fuel economy by
5%.- Check into carpooling and public transit to cut mileage and car
maintenance costs.


Car Maintenance Tips:- Use the grade of motor oil recommended by your
cars manufacturer. Using a different motor oil can lower your
gasoline
mileage by 1% to 2%.- Keep tires properly inflated and aligned to
improve your gasoline mileage by around 3.3%.- Get regular engine
tune-
ups and car maintenance checks to avoid fuel economy problems due to
worn spark plugs, dragging brakes, low transmission fluid, or
transmission problems.- Replace clogged air filters to improve gas
mileage by as much as 10% and protect your engine.- Combine errands
into one trip. Several short trips, each one taken from a cold start,
can use twice as much fuel as one trip covering the same distance
when
the engine is warm. Do not forget that in the first mile your car
uses
8 times more fuel, in the second mile 4 times and only after the
fourth mile it becomes normal.Long-Term Savings Tip- Consider buying
a
highly fuel-efficient vehicle. A fuelefficient vehicle, a hybrid
vehicle, or an alternative fuel vehicle could save you a lot at the
gas pump
and help the environment.See the Fuel Economy Guide
(www.fueleconomy.gov) for more on buying a new fuel-efficient car or
truck.


Source:
www.eere.energy.gov and
http://www.vcd.org/155.html

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Old 16-11-2008, 05:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

In article
,
Energy Saver wrote:

Driving and Car Maintenance Transportation accounts for 66% of U.S.
oil use


I'm going to cut my CAR MAINTENANCE TRANSPORTATION by 50%. Will that
decrease my gas consumption by half?

Many of the tips listed here are good advice - if you have a twenty year
old car.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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Old 16-11-2008, 05:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

On Nov 16, 6:32 am, Energy Saver wrote:
- Reduce drag by placing items inside
the car or trunk rather than on roof racks. A roof rack or carrier
provides additional cargo space and may allow you to buy a smaller
car. However, a loaded roof rack can decrease your fuel economy by
5%.-


I see those Ex-cargo things on car roofs when I"m on the highways. I
often wonder what the heck ppl are transporting in them. Anyone
here use one?
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Old 16-11-2008, 05:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

wrote:

I see those Ex-cargo things on car roofs when I"m on the highways. I
often wonder what the heck ppl are transporting in them. Anyone
here use one?


Extra purses, shoes, summer dresses, etc...

ObFood: Prime Ribeye for breakfast. Finshed pics in ABF in a few
minutes.

http://i33.tinypic.com/250778l.jpg

-sw
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Old 16-11-2008, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

On Nov 16, 2:38�pm, sf wrote:
On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 09:09:39 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

On Nov 16, 6:32 am, Energy Saver wrote:
- Reduce drag by placing items inside
the car or trunk rather than on roof racks. A roof rack or carrier
provides additional cargo space and may allow you to buy a smaller
car. However, a loaded roof rack can decrease your fuel economy by
5%.-


I see those Ex-cargo things on car roofs when I"m on the highways. I
often wonder what the heck ppl are transporting in them. � �Anyone
here use one?


Ex-cargo.... those enclosed boxy things? �The only time I notice them,
the car is loaded with family, so I assume they're either moving or on
a long road trip. �I'd never consider one for myself. �The thing
people around here use are roof racks for skis - if they don't drive a
gas guzzling SUV that they can throw their skis inside.


Modern skis are about a quarter shorter than they were just a few
short years ago. Today the average ht/wt adult uses downhill skis
150-160 centimeters. In fact ski lodges won't permit the old
fashioned long skis on their slopes anymore, they're much less
manueverable, much too dangerous to other skiers. Nowadays skis fit
easily into a Corolla, hardly anyone carries skis on a roof rack
anymore. If anyone shows up with old style skis these days they'll be
made to leave them outside the lodge and they'll need to rent or go
home.



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Old 16-11-2008, 08:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

On Nov 16, 2:52�pm, Dan Abel wrote:
In article
,

wrote:
On Nov 16, 6:32 am, Energy Saver wrote:
�- Reduce drag by placing items inside
the car or trunk rather than on roof racks. A roof rack or carrier
provides additional cargo space and may allow you to buy a smaller
car. However, a loaded roof rack can decrease your fuel economy by
5%.-


I see those Ex-cargo things on car roofs when I"m on the highways. I
often wonder what the heck ppl are transporting in them. � �Anyone
here use one?


I think they're used for camping and traveling. �It's too much work to
take them off and find a place to store them, so I'll bet that 95% of
the ones you see on the road are empty. �And yes, they reduce your gas
mileage quite a bit.



Those roof top carriers are mostly used for transporting lightweight
bulky items, like bedding, winter garments, breakables like glassware,
and such. People typically use those carriers when moving and don't
trust the movers with Aunt Jane's lamps, or bulky musical instruments,
like a cello. Such bulky items are not permitted to block vision on
Interstates so they can't be placed into the passenger compartment.

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Old 16-11-2008, 08:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

Sheldon wrote:

On Nov 16, 2:38�pm, sf wrote:
On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 09:09:39 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

On Nov 16, 6:32 am, Energy Saver wrote:
- Reduce drag by placing items inside
the car or trunk rather than on roof racks. A roof rack or carrier
provides additional cargo space and may allow you to buy a smaller
car. However, a loaded roof rack can decrease your fuel economy by
5%.-


I see those Ex-cargo things on car roofs when I"m on the highways. I
often wonder what the heck ppl are transporting in them. � �Anyone
here use one?


Ex-cargo.... those enclosed boxy things? �The only time I notice them,
the car is loaded with family, so I assume they're either moving or on
a long road trip. �I'd never consider one for myself. �The thing
people around here use are roof racks for skis - if they don't drive a
gas guzzling SUV that they can throw their skis inside.


Modern skis are about a quarter shorter than they were just a few
short years ago. Today the average ht/wt adult uses downhill skis
150-160 centimeters. In fact ski lodges won't permit the old
fashioned long skis on their slopes anymore, they're much less
manueverable, much too dangerous to other skiers.


You're so full of shit your eyes are turning brown.

What triggers you to go off on these tangents and make up bullshit
like this? Is there a psychological term for "Pathological
Bullshitter"?

-sw
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Old 16-11-2008, 09:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 12:19:50 -0800 (PST), Sheldon
wrote:

Modern skis are about a quarter shorter than they were just a few
short years ago. Today the average ht/wt adult uses downhill skis
150-160 centimeters. In fact ski lodges won't permit the old
fashioned long skis on their slopes anymore, they're much less
manueverable, much too dangerous to other skiers.


Where did you get this information?

Nowadays skis fit
easily into a Corolla, hardly anyone carries skis on a roof rack
anymore.


The short ones probably do if the trunk is empty, but many people have
luggage in their trunks so their skis go on a roof rack. I know some
cars (I owned one) have a hole that opens from the trunk into the
car's interior so skis can be carried between the seats. I have
trouble visualizing more than one set of skis though, maybe it can
carry two if you stack them and use bungee cords to keep them from
slipping.

If anyone shows up with old style skis these days they'll be
made to leave them outside the lodge and they'll need to rent or go
home.


That's not true. I've never heard of anyone being turned away due to
the length of their skis. In general, novice skiers wear short skis,
expert skiers wear long(er) skis.... unless they're on snowboards.


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West


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Old 17-11-2008, 12:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

Sheldon wrote:

Modern skis are about a quarter shorter than they were just a few
short years ago. Today the average ht/wt adult uses downhill skis
150-160 centimeters. In fact ski lodges won't permit the old
fashioned long skis on their slopes anymore, they're much less
manueverable, much too dangerous to other skiers. Nowadays skis fit
easily into a Corolla, hardly anyone carries skis on a roof rack
anymore. If anyone shows up with old style skis these days they'll be
made to leave them outside the lodge and they'll need to rent or go
home.



Maybe in NY but definitely not at any Colorado ski areas. I prefer
shorter skis because they are easier for me to maneuver but I see many
people, particularly young men, with very long skis 200+cm. charging
through the bumps.

gloria p
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Old 17-11-2008, 04:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default How you can save fuel and the environment

On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 14:55:15 -0600, Sqwertz wrote:

Sheldon wrote:


Modern skis are about a quarter shorter than they were just a few
short years ago. Today the average ht/wt adult uses downhill skis
150-160 centimeters. In fact ski lodges won't permit the old
fashioned long skis on their slopes anymore, they're much less
manueverable, much too dangerous to other skiers.


You're so full of shit your eyes are turning brown.

What triggers you to go off on these tangents and make up bullshit
like this? Is there a psychological term for "Pathological
Bullshitter"?

-sw


sheldon has an entire chapter devoted to him in the upcoming Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V.

your pal,
blake


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