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Old 15-11-2008, 04:35 PM
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Default Boiling, poaching, simmering, and killing germs

I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman to cook for me, I have to do this dreary stuff myself. I read a book with 487 chicken recipes, and I still don't know how to cook a chicken breast in water for sandwiches. Persons with my degree of inaptitude don't want to know from moist, savory, tasteful, sauces, and thermometers I just want to know enough to avoid E. coli and salmonella.

Depending on which package has the least juice on the bottom, I buy skinless, boneless, chicken breasts or chicken breasts that have skin on and/or bone in. All I want to do is cook this stuff to eat with rice or for sandwiches.

Do I have to rinse the raw chicken first? How much water do I put in the pot with it? Do I put salt in the water? Do I bring the water to a boil? If so, I imagine I reduce it to a simmer, right? How long do I simmer? How do I save the leftovers? How long can I keep them before they get hairy?

After I get this down pat, I'll go for the Alton Brown treatment.

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Old 15-11-2008, 09:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Boiling, poaching, simmering, and killing germs

bonappettit wrote on Sat, 15 Nov 2008 16:35:59 +0000:

Depending on which package has the least juice on the bottom,
I buyskinless, boneless, chicken breasts or chicken breasts
that have skinon and/or bone in. All I want to do is cook this
stuff to eat with riceor for sandwiches.


Do I have to rinse the raw chicken first? How much water do I
put inthe pot with it? Do I put salt in the water? Do I bring
the water to aboil? If so, I imagine I reduce it to a simmer,
right? How long do Isimmer? How do I save the leftovers? How
long can I keep them beforethey get hairy?



When I want cold chicken from chicken breasts, I usually simmer them in
chicken stock until the meat is white all the way thro. I've no real
idea of time and do it by inspection without washing the packaged meat.
Dehydrated chicken stock is pretty cheap. The cooked chicken can frozen
before or after slicing.
--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 15-11-2008, 09:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Boiling, poaching, simmering, and killing germs

bonappettit wrote:

Depending on which package has the least juice on the bottom, I buy
skinless, boneless, chicken breasts or chicken breasts that have skin
on and/or bone in. All I want to do is cook this stuff to eat with rice
or for sandwiches.


Skin-on and bone-in are cheaper and fresher than
boneless/skinless, even if they are the same age.
Freshness is lost faster after the meat is separated.

Do I have to rinse the raw chicken first? How much water do I put in
the pot with it? Do I put salt in the water? Do I bring the water to a
boil? If so, I imagine I reduce it to a simmer, right? How long do I
simmer? How do I save the leftovers? How long can I keep them before
they get hairy?


If you're really concerned about germs, a pressure
cooker is the way to go. You can put a whole chicken
in there, pressure cook for a little while, and it
will be fully cooked in hardly any time. The meat
is easily pulled off from all the body parts, and
you can keep it for a few days in the fridge.
Whole chickens are much cheaper than any other
form of chicken. Note that there's a plastic bag
of giblets (heart, liver, gizzard) in the body cavity.
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Old 15-11-2008, 09:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Mark Thorson wrote:

Skin-on and bone-in are cheaper and fresher than
boneless/skinless, even if they are the same age.
Freshness is lost faster after the meat is separated.


I forgot to mention that when bought in packages,
usually 3 bone-in half-breasts per package, always
look for the cheapest package. That saves you money
without costing any meat. When the breast is cut
in half, one side gets the sternum and the other side
doesn't. The heaviest packages are those in which
all three half-breasts have the sternum. The lightest
packages are the ones in which all three lack the
sternum, at least on average. There is some size
variation among birds, but if you always go for the
lightest packages, you won't get many sternums.
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Old 15-11-2008, 09:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Mark Thorson said...

Skin-on and bone-in are cheaper and fresher than
boneless/skinless, even if they are the same age.
Freshness is lost faster after the meat is separated.



Is that so? I've found the bone-in chicken parts to be equally frozen at the
supermarket.

Andy



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Old 15-11-2008, 09:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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bonappettit wrote:
I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton
Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman
to cook for me, I have to do this dreary stuff myself. I read a book
with 487 chicken recipes, and I still don't know how to cook a chicken
breast in water for sandwiches. Persons with my degree of inaptitude
don't want to know from moist, savory, tasteful, sauces, and
thermometers I just want to know enough to avoid E. coli and
salmonella.

Depending on which package has the least juice on the bottom, I buy
skinless, boneless, chicken breasts or chicken breasts that have skin
on and/or bone in. All I want to do is cook this stuff to eat with rice
or for sandwiches.

Do I have to rinse the raw chicken first? How much water do I put in
the pot with it? Do I put salt in the water? Do I bring the water to a
boil? If so, I imagine I reduce it to a simmer, right? How long do I
simmer? How do I save the leftovers? How long can I keep them before
they get hairy?

After I get this down pat, I'll go for the Alton Brown treatment.




Alton Brown is actually someone good to learn from because you are
actually learning the science behind the process not just watching
someone assembling something.

The simplest approach is to poach them like this:

Bring water* (4 cups) to boil, rinse the chicken and drop into the pot
and reduce the heat so it simmers. Let it simmer for ~ 70 minutes, cover
the pot (don't peek), turn off the heat and let it sit until cool to
the touch.

*You can poach in anything you like such as plain water, or add some
white wine, or lemon, or use stock. You can also quarter an onion and
add that or a couple cloves of smashed garlic or whatever seasoning you
like.

Wrap the leftovers in plastic wrap and refrigerate.
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Old 15-11-2008, 09:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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George wrote:
bonappettit wrote:
I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton
Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman
to cook for me, I have to do this dreary stuff myself. I read a book
with 487 chicken recipes, and I still don't know how to cook a chicken
breast in water for sandwiches. Persons with my degree of inaptitude
don't want to know from moist, savory, tasteful, sauces, and
thermometers I just want to know enough to avoid E. coli and
salmonella.
Depending on which package has the least juice on the bottom, I buy
skinless, boneless, chicken breasts or chicken breasts that have skin
on and/or bone in. All I want to do is cook this stuff to eat with rice
or for sandwiches.
Do I have to rinse the raw chicken first? How much water do I put in
the pot with it? Do I put salt in the water? Do I bring the water to a
boil? If so, I imagine I reduce it to a simmer, right? How long do I
simmer? How do I save the leftovers? How long can I keep them before
they get hairy?
After I get this down pat, I'll go for the Alton Brown treatment.




Alton Brown is actually someone good to learn from because you are
actually learning the science behind the process not just watching
someone assembling something.

The simplest approach is to poach them like this:

Bring water* (4 cups) to boil, rinse the chicken and drop into the pot
and reduce the heat so it simmers. Let it simmer for ~ 70 minutes, cover
the pot (don't peek), turn off the heat and let it sit until cool to
the touch.


Above time should be *7* minutes.


*You can poach in anything you like such as plain water, or add some
white wine, or lemon, or use stock. You can also quarter an onion and
add that or a couple cloves of smashed garlic or whatever seasoning you
like.

Wrap the leftovers in plastic wrap and refrigerate.

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Old 15-11-2008, 09:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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bonappettit said...

I just want to know enough to avoid E. coli and
salmonella.



There are temperatures to cook to, to ensure meat is safe to eat. Get a two-
bit quick read thermometer for starters.

There. Ya got homework!

TROLL!!!

OR, just stick to Tyson breaded chicken parts and nuke as directed and save
yourself from your "dread."

Andy
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Old 15-11-2008, 09:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Andy wrote:

Mark Thorson said...

Skin-on and bone-in are cheaper and fresher than
boneless/skinless, even if they are the same age.
Freshness is lost faster after the meat is separated.


Is that so? I've found the bone-in chicken parts to be equally frozen at the
supermarket.


Most supermarkets sell packaged chicken parts in thawed
form, which I think was implied. For you, I'll say that
thawed was presumed. Thawed boneless/skinless loses
freshness faster than leaving it on the bone with the
skin on until shortly before cooking.
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Old 15-11-2008, 09:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Boiling, poaching, simmering, and killing germs

George wrote:

Bring water* (4 cups) to boil, rinse the chicken and drop into the pot
and reduce the heat so it simmers. Let it simmer for ~ 70 minutes, cover
the pot (don't peek), turn off the heat and let it sit until cool to
the touch.


Simmer chicken pieces for 70 minutes? Maybe if you're making stock,
but the chicken would be cooked in less than half that time.

-sw


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Old 15-11-2008, 09:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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George wrote:

Above time should be *7* minutes.


OK. I'll forgive you.

-sw
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Old 15-11-2008, 10:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article ,
bonappettit wrote:

I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton
Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman
to cook for me, I have to do this dreary stuff myself. I read a book
with 487 chicken recipes, and I still don't know how to cook a chicken
breast in water for sandwiches.


Just buy it from the deli. No fuss, no muss and it comes already sliced.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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Old 15-11-2008, 10:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Boiling, poaching, simmering, and killing germs

On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 16:35:59 +0000, bonappettit
wrote:


I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton
Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman
to cook for me, I have to do this dreary stuff myself. I read a book
with 487 chicken recipes, and I still don't know how to cook a chicken
breast in water for sandwiches. Persons with my degree of inaptitude
don't want to know from moist, savory, tasteful, sauces, and
thermometers I just want to know enough to avoid E. coli and
salmonella.

Depending on which package has the least juice on the bottom, I buy
skinless, boneless, chicken breasts or chicken breasts that have skin
on and/or bone in. All I want to do is cook this stuff to eat with rice
or for sandwiches.

Do I have to rinse the raw chicken first? How much water do I put in
the pot with it? Do I put salt in the water? Do I bring the water to a
boil? If so, I imagine I reduce it to a simmer, right? How long do I
simmer? How do I save the leftovers? How long can I keep them before
they get hairy?

After I get this down pat, I'll go for the Alton Brown treatment.


Don't boil it - that ruins it! Put your chicken into a frypan and
sprinkle seasoning over it (use Mrs Dash or another pre-prepared
chicken spice if you really want to keep it simple) and then add some
water. Cook the chicken for 10-15 minutes or until the water has all
gone. Turn the chicken over and add more water and do it again. At the
end you should have deliciously moist chicken ready to use for
whatever you want.
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Old 16-11-2008, 02:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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bonappettit wrote:
I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton
Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman
to cook for me, I have to be a ****ing asshole.

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Old 16-11-2008, 10:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Boiling, poaching, simmering, and killing germs

"bonappettit"

I am essentially a not too bright male who regards persons like Alton
Brown with profound suspicion. Unable to find a self-sacrificing woman
to cook for me,


I wonder why? Almost every woman I know wants to be thought os as a cheap,
short order cook.

I have to do this dreary stuff myself. I read a book with 487 chicken
recipes, and I still don't know how to cook a chicken
breast in water for sandwiches.


Go buy any of the basic cookbooks and inside there are recipes for poaching,
stewing, baking, roasting, braising, frying, etc. There are even a few
recipes for what to do with the resulting cooked stuff.

Persons with my degree of inaptitude don't want to know from moist, savory,
tasteful, sauces, and thermometers - I just want to know enough to avoid E.
coli and
salmonella.


Just eat from a deli where they are paid to cook safe food and inspected
regularly.

bonappettit


I'm afraid your post did nothing for my appetite.




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