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Old 25-10-2008, 07:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Mundane Questions that a Fairly Sophisticated Cook is Afraid to Ask

I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo

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Old 25-10-2008, 07:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Lynn from Fargo wrote:
I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo

Never tried to make Rice a Roni but I nearly always cook my raw brown
rice in a little canola or olive oil before steaming it. Just cook it
enough that you can smell a slight nutty smell when you wave your hand
over the pot. Adds a lot of flavor to the rice. I'm sure you could do
the same thing to your rice and orzo. You then add spice/flavoring to
your own taste.
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Old 25-10-2008, 08:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Lynn from Fargo" wrote in message
...
I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo


Yes, you can. I used to make something like that--much less healthy than
your version! G-- on camping trips, using rice, broken-up spaghetti,
canned super-chunky soup, and whatever else was on hand, such as bouillon
cubes, dried herbs, grated romano, some sauteed onions, and the like.


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Old 25-10-2008, 09:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 11:30:58 -0700 (PDT), Lynn from Fargo
wrote:

Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?


How does this look?
http://everydayculinaryadventures.bl...cat-night.html


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
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Old 25-10-2008, 11:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Lynn from Fargo wrote:

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.


I've only had Rice A Roni twice, and was violently ill
both times. I don't what's in there that I react to,
and I don't know of any other food item which provokes
that reaction in me. The only other food I avoid because
of a peculiar reaction is bean protein, like tofu. Gives
me terrible headaches. It took over 30 years for me
to figure out what was causing those headaches.


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Old 26-10-2008, 01:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 11:30:58 -0700 (PDT), Lynn from Fargo
wrote:

Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?


Yes! Find an interesting recipe for rice pilaf, perloo, or pilau and
follow the basic format from there.

Tara
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Old 26-10-2008, 01:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Lynn from Fargo wrote:

I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo


LOL. Yes, you can.
Have been making my own Rice-a-Roni-effect dish for years! The pasta
(fideo) and rice are browned first then the water and seasoning added
and cooked.
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Old 26-10-2008, 03:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Lynn in Fargo...yeah, you do need to stop using the mixes...IF you're
counting sodium! Man...they PACK the salt in!

I bet you could make your own "rice-a-roni by breaking up thin
vermicelli into small bits, using a low sodium beef broth and whatever
herbs are listed on the box...?

Lass

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Old 26-10-2008, 05:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 11:30:58 -0700 (PDT), Lynn from Fargo
wrote:

I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo


For what it's worth, the couple of boxes of RaR I have on the shelf
still have those directions on them - brown rice/vermicelli mix in two
tablespoons butter or margarine. However, they do have a new line,
"Natures Way RIce A Roni" that skip that step and go straight to a
saucepan and use olive oil. Maybe that's the ones you've been looking
at in the market?

That said, I've always made straight pilaf using rice and broken bits
of thin spaghetti. Sautee the grains with some chopped onion in oil,
then add about two and a half cups chicken stock. Cover and simmer
until liquid is absorbed. This is actually faster and easier than
using a RaR box mix. Not to mention cheaper. But there are times when
certain family members insist on RaR. I think it's a comfort food sort
of thing.
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Old 27-10-2008, 05:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Thanks to all of you! (No thanks to Google Groups for screwing this up
for days!)
Gonna do this sometimes this week
Lynn
PS: hanks to Barb for the email and her recipe too.
============================================

On Oct 25, 1:22*pm, "Janet" wrote:
"Lynn from Fargo" *Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?


I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo



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Old 27-10-2008, 09:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Lynn from Fargo wrote:
I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo


Lynn,
I heard the following about the roots of rice-a-roni on NPR a few
weeks ago.
The link is:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=93067862

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Old 28-10-2008, 12:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article
,
Lynn from Fargo wrote:

I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo


Here's the way to do it: Crumble up vermicelli into rice-size chunks.
Heat olive oil in pan and saute vermicelli in it until it begins to
brown. Stir in the rice, then the broth or water. Simmer until the
rice is done. The proportion of vermicelli to rice to broth is 1:2:4
(i.e., 1/2 c. vermicelli, 1 c. rice, and 2 c. broth).

Cindy

--
C.J. Fuller

Delete the obvious to email me
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Old 28-10-2008, 03:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Cindy Fuller wrote:
In article
,
Lynn from Fargo wrote:

I'm starting this post with one question but certainly invite anyone
to post to it. I personally intend to add other questions when they
arise. Please don't get on my case, as I will undoubtedly be admitting
my shortcuts (and shortcomings),

First Question: The directions for Rice a Roni used to have you use a
skillet to brown the rice and vermicelli in a little butter or olive
oil before you add the seasonings and the water. Now the directions
tell you to just make it in a saucepan.

I like how it tastes when it's browned, but I gotta cut the sodium
waaaaaaay back (it's over 1000 mg per serving!). Can I just use
regular rice and orzo and olive oil and make my own spice/flavoring
and follow the original directions?

I gotta stop using these dang mixes!
Lynn in Fargo


Here's the way to do it: Crumble up vermicelli into rice-size chunks.
Heat olive oil in pan and saute vermicelli in it until it begins to
brown. Stir in the rice, then the broth or water. Simmer until the
rice is done. The proportion of vermicelli to rice to broth is 1:2:4
(i.e., 1/2 c. vermicelli, 1 c. rice, and 2 c. broth).

Cindy


You can buy short cut vermicelli at Middle Eastern stores. Luckily, I
live near a large Armenian/Lebanese community, so I have several to
choose from.

You can also buy it online.

http://parthenonfoods.com/sipa-noodl...lli-p-984.html

Just a thought.

-Tracy
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Old 28-10-2008, 11:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Tracy wrote:

Cindy Fuller wrote:


snip

Here's the way to do it: Crumble up vermicelli into rice-size chunks.
Heat olive oil in pan and saute vermicelli in it until it begins to
brown. Stir in the rice, then the broth or water. Simmer until the
rice is done. The proportion of vermicelli to rice to broth is 1:2:4
(i.e., 1/2 c. vermicelli, 1 c. rice, and 2 c. broth).

Cindy


You can buy short cut vermicelli at Middle Eastern stores. Luckily, I
live near a large Armenian/Lebanese community, so I have several to
choose from.

You can also buy it online.

http://parthenonfoods.com/sipa-noodl...lli-p-984.html

Just a thought.

-Tracy



There are also Mexican brands of short vermicelli/fideo, one being
'Moderna' as well as a US brand 'Q and Q', imported from Texas
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Old 29-10-2008, 12:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 27, 3:20*pm, George Cebulka wrote:
Lynn,
* * I heard the following about the roots of rice-a-roni on NPR a few
weeks ago.
The link is:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=93067862


Thanks, George! I loved it and copied the recipe.
Lynn in Fargo


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