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Old 12-10-2008, 11:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Christine replied:

I'm going to make minestrone this coming Wednesday night instead,
provided the nights are still chilly here.


Oh, great!!!

Let us know how it turns out...


Here's what the "Silver Palate" ladies wrote about minestrone in _The New
Basics Cookbook_:

"Minestrone, the quintessential Italian vegetable soup, varies from region
to region throughout that country. In Milan it is made with rice and peas
(not beans), in Genoa pesto is added, in Florence the beans are cooked
separately and half of them puréed to thicken the soup, and in southern
Italy minestrone is based on garlic."

"While we generally serve minestrone as a hot first course, in Italy, in the
summertime, we've enjoyed it at room temperature. In any season, though, it
must be served with freshly grated Parmesan."

Since Lin likes her soups to be thick, I'm leaning toward the Florentine
method. I plan to loosely follow Marcella Hazan's recipe from _Essentials of
Classic Italian Cooking_, but thicken the soup with bean purée as noted
above, and add a mixture of carrot juice and V-8 before serving. The recipe
calls for either brodo (made from beef, veal, and chicken) or beef broth; I
plan to use a mixture of chicken stock and trotter broth. Also, since Lin is
a big fan of French onion soup, I'll probably do some kind of cheesy crouton
on top rather than simply adding microplaned Parmesan. Or maybe I'll do that
for *her* and put a dollop of pesto or tapenade into mine instead.

Bob



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Old 12-10-2008, 07:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 03:36:24 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:


Since Lin likes her soups to be thick, I'm leaning toward the Florentine
method. I plan to loosely follow Marcella Hazan's recipe from _Essentials of
Classic Italian Cooking_, but thicken the soup with bean purée as noted
above, and add a mixture of carrot juice and V-8 before serving. The recipe
calls for either brodo (made from beef, veal, and chicken) or beef broth; I
plan to use a mixture of chicken stock and trotter broth. Also, since Lin is
a big fan of French onion soup, I'll probably do some kind of cheesy crouton
on top rather than simply adding microplaned Parmesan. Or maybe I'll do that
for *her* and put a dollop of pesto or tapenade into mine instead.

Bob


Hmm..I haven't checked those books yet... Might get more ideas on
what I want to do, from those.

Christine
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-11, jmcquown wrote:

I don't have a digital camera here


No problem. Can't catch flavor with a camera, anyway.

nb
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-12, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

The rinds are supposed to cook a long time, so they soften and release
flavor into the soup. The finishing touch would be grated parmagiana itself,
rather than the rind.


I agree, Bob. I've done the "rind" thing and consider it a waste of time,
no matter how good the original cheese. A good 2 yr old Italian grated
Parmigiano-Reggiano is essential if you are going for the gold. Better yet,
I prefer a Pecorino Romano of the same quality. Anything less and one is
just clowning around.

nb

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Old 12-10-2008, 07:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-12, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

Classic Italian Cooking_, but thicken the soup with bean purée as noted
above, and add a mixture of carrot juice and V-8 before serving.


I again agree. The thickness is a personal thing and not necessarry, my
having expereinced a killer minestrone as thin as oriental broths. I
also prefer this, adding cannelloni beans, half pureed and half whole (can I say
that?). Still, they are only one component in a good ministrone, but one I
prefer.

nb


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Old 12-10-2008, 08:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-11, Nancy Young wrote:

2 small leeks (or 1 large), white and light green parts sliced thin
crosswise (about 3/4 cup) and washed thoroughly
2 medium carrots , peeled and cut into small dice (about 3/4 cup)
2 small onions , peeled and cut into small dice (about 3/4 cup)
2 medium ribs celery , trimmed and cut into small dice (about 3/4 cup)
1 medium baking potato , peeled and cut into medium dice (about 1 1/4
cups)
1 medium zucchini , trimmed and cut into medium dice (about 1 1/4 cups)
3 cups stemmed spinach leaves , cut into thin strips
(28 ounce) can whole tomatoes , packed in juice, drained, and chopped
8 cups water
1 Parmesan cheese rind , about 5 x 2 inches
Table salt
1/2 cup Arborio rice (or small pasta shape, such as elbows, ditalini,
or orzo)
1 can (15 ounces) cannellini beans , drained and rinsed (about 1 1/2
cups)
1/4 cup basil pesto (or 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary mixed with
1 teaspoon minced garlic and 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil)
Ground black pepper


Interesting to see CIs take on minestrone. As usual, they've screwed it all
up!

On the good side, I like the leeks inclusion. Never tried leeks. Doing
good till we get down to "8 cups water". Boring! We all know my take on
soups. Gotta be broth based. The French don't keep 5 stockpots full of
simmering stocks going for the Hell of it. Flavor, people, flavor. My
minestrone is beef broth based. Weak broth or bullion cubes is better than
water. I've also weighed in on cheese rind. Nada.

All the rest, with two exceptions looks good, that being rice and pesto.
Rice!? WTF!!?? I've never eaten a minestrone with rice in my entire life.
Even in some of the classic Italian places in Little Italy in San Francisco.
Apperently, ol' Chris is having some sort of brain aneurysm. Same goes for
the pesto. Minestrone does not include pesto, ferchrynoutloud. Leave it up
to CI to eff up an iron ball. I would expect nothing less.

nb

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Old 12-10-2008, 08:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-11, Christine Dabney wrote:

I think some recipes call for prosciutto, and I have some chopped
prosciutto in the freezer, that should be used up soon.

Don't some recipes call for pancetta?


Either will do, though prosciutto is better. As I said in chat, this is the
secret ingredient, though not really necessary. Either just makes it that
much better. More, later.

nb
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-11, sf sf wrote:

You're in for a real treat! Don't forget the bread too.


Excellent point, sf. A good bread w/ butter is essential to the final
experince.

nb
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 19:04:14 GMT, notbob wrote:


All the rest, with two exceptions looks good, that being rice and pesto.
Rice!? WTF!!?? I've never eaten a minestrone with rice in my entire life.
Even in some of the classic Italian places in Little Italy in San Francisco.
Apperently, ol' Chris is having some sort of brain aneurysm. Same goes for
the pesto. Minestrone does not include pesto, ferchrynoutloud. Leave it up
to CI to eff up an iron ball. I would expect nothing less.

nb


From the reading I have been doing, from various Italian experts, rice
is occasionally used. Pasta seems to be more common, but rice is
considered a part of some minestrones.

And pesto is a part of a Genovese Minestrone. This is from quite a
few Italian books...and experts.

Christine
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-11, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I don't think I've ever eaten minestrone that had any kind of meat in it,


One of the best I've ever experienced didn't. Mine is better.

nb


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Old 12-10-2008, 08:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-11, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

1/2 cup arborio rice


BRAAAHHHHPPPP!!!!

Oh sorry....... wrong answer!
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 19:04:14 GMT, notbob wrote:


On the good side, I like the leeks inclusion. Never tried leeks. Doing
good till we get down to "8 cups water". Boring! We all know my take on
soups. Gotta be broth based. The French don't keep 5 stockpots full of
simmering stocks going for the Hell of it. Flavor, people, flavor.


Some of the books I have been reading are adamant that it be made with
water.

And to disagree with you on the broth and the French. Maybe in
commercial kitchens, broth is more common, but from the French
housewife often just uses water. I can quote several sources on this,
from Richard Olney, to Madeline Kamman.

And believe me, my soupe au pistou, which is made with water and NOT
broth, is very, very tasty, and definitely not boring. I taste the
vegetables then, and not the overriding flavor of the broth.

Christine
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Old 12-10-2008, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2008-10-12, Christine Dabney wrote:

From the reading I have been doing, from various Italian experts, rice
is occasionally used. Pasta seems to be more common, but rice is
considered a part of some minestrones.


Seems to be a wide disparity from N. Italian cuisine to S. Makes sense.
I'm reflecting my personal dislike of rice and CI, in general.

nb
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Old 12-10-2008, 10:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 12, 12:08*pm, notbob wrote:
On 2008-10-11, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I don't think I've ever eaten minestrone that had any kind of meat in it,


One of the best I've ever experienced didn't. *Mine is better. *

nb


Are you going to post yours?

Wayne
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Old 12-10-2008, 10:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Oct 12, 12:10*pm, notbob wrote:
On 2008-10-11, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

1/2 cup arborio rice


BRAAAHHHHPPPP!!!!

Oh sorry....... wrong answer!


What's wrong with that?

Wayne


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