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Old 25-09-2008, 07:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread machine
truly saves time.

The bread certainly does not rise or bake any faster in a bread machine.

If you use a bread machine, you do not have to knead the bread, and that
saves about 10 minutes, but at least some of that savings is countered by
having to get the bread machine out of and back into storage, unless of
course you have the counter space to keep it set up all the time.

If you make bread by the sponge method, the sponge has to be started the day
before the actual baking (or at least that is the impression that I get from
several of the recipes that I looked at - I have never used that method),
but it isn't like you have to sit out in the kitchen watching the sponge
develop.

Also the impression that I get is that the development of the sponge is what
develops the flavor, and whether the kneading method is by hand or
mechanical in a bread machine or whatever really does not make that much
difference (though opinions seem to vary on this as well), but like with the
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen



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Old 25-09-2008, 11:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

It's a favourite appliance of mine, next to the coffee maker, both in
usefullness and on the counter. I wouldn't be without it.

It takes me about 15 minutes to put the ingredients in, and then just forget
it 'til it's done.
It probably saves a bit on power over a conventional oven, too, because of
volume, but that also is minor.
Time saving? Well, I can only say I don't have to watch or time it for
rising, kneading, or finishing. 'Course I don't get the options to change
those items, either.
I like it.

"Brian Christiansen" wrote in message
...
I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread
machine truly saves time.

The bread certainly does not rise or bake any faster in a bread machine.

If you use a bread machine, you do not have to knead the bread, and that
saves about 10 minutes, but at least some of that savings is countered by
having to get the bread machine out of and back into storage, unless of
course you have the counter space to keep it set up all the time.

If you make bread by the sponge method, the sponge has to be started the
day before the actual baking (or at least that is the impression that I
get from several of the recipes that I looked at - I have never used that
method), but it isn't like you have to sit out in the kitchen watching the
sponge develop.

Also the impression that I get is that the development of the sponge is
what develops the flavor, and whether the kneading method is by hand or
mechanical in a bread machine or whatever really does not make that much
difference (though opinions seem to vary on this as well), but like with
the straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


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Old 25-09-2008, 12:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

"Brian *Pinhead* Christiansen" wrote:
I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. �While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread machine
truly saves.


If you need to ask than you truly know nothing about making bread, or
anything else.

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Old 25-09-2008, 01:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

In article ,
"Brian Christiansen" wrote:
(snip)
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


It gives the perception of saving time, I think.

And there are those folks who get off on using the delay timer so they
can have fresh bread when they wake in the morning.

The machines let people with *absolutely no experience* turn out a loaf
of freshly baked bread. Often, those folks also have *absolutely no
interest* in working dough with their own hands whatsoever.

They may not save time but they save energy of motion. The only thing
you have to do is measure accurately and put the ingredients into the
pan in the right order. No stirring, no wondering if you're doing it
right.

I borrowed my daughter's a couple years ago and used it maybe four or
five times to see what the shouting is about. Reminds me that I should
return it to them.

I'm not sure that their attractiveness is based on saving time, Brian.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
on "A Prairie Home Companion," http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
programs/2008/08/30/
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Old 25-09-2008, 01:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
"Brian Christiansen" wrote:
(snip)
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


(snippety)
I borrowed my daughter's a couple years ago and used it maybe four or
five times to see what the shouting is about. Reminds me that I
should return it to them.

I'm not sure that their attractiveness is based on saving time, Brian.



My brother got an ABM for Christmas some years ago. The prospect of working
dough by hand was *not* his idea of a good time but he loves (who doesn't?)
the smell of bread baking. Like you, he used it maybe 4-5 times. The
novelty wore off and it became just another thing to store. I think he gave
it away when he moved.

Pssst, Barb, if your daughter hasn't asked for it back after a couple of
years I'm guessing she didn't use it much, either

Jill



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Old 25-09-2008, 01:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

On Sep 25, 2:44 am, "Brian Christiansen"
wrote:
I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread machine
truly saves time.

The bread certainly does not rise or bake any faster in a bread machine.

If you use a bread machine, you do not have to knead the bread, and that
saves about 10 minutes, but at least some of that savings is countered by
having to get the bread machine out of and back into storage, unless of
course you have the counter space to keep it set up all the time.

If you make bread by the sponge method, the sponge has to be started the day
before the actual baking (or at least that is the impression that I get from
several of the recipes that I looked at - I have never used that method),
but it isn't like you have to sit out in the kitchen watching the sponge
develop.

Also the impression that I get is that the development of the sponge is what
develops the flavor, and whether the kneading method is by hand or
mechanical in a bread machine or whatever really does not make that much
difference (though opinions seem to vary on this as well), but like with the
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


For me, it's the saving of money, it's the superior taste and
nutrition, it's the aroma which fills the house, it's never running
out of bread, it's the variety one can enjoy....I've had a machine for
almost 20 years and have never been sorry. Sure, it takes a little
planning, but it's become part of the home routine.
I have two machines now, and there ARE days when both are hummin'.
It takes about two minutes to dump in the ingredients. Hell, I've
waited longer at the a supermkt bakery counter for someone to get me
bread, bag it, slap on a price and not say thank you.
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Old 25-09-2008, 02:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
"Brian Christiansen" wrote:
(snip)
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


It gives the perception of saving time, I think.

And there are those folks who get off on using the delay timer so they
can have fresh bread when they wake in the morning.

The machines let people with *absolutely no experience* turn out a loaf
of freshly baked bread. Often, those folks also have *absolutely no
interest* in working dough with their own hands whatsoever.

They may not save time but they save energy of motion. The only thing
you have to do is measure accurately and put the ingredients into the
pan in the right order. No stirring, no wondering if you're doing it
right.

I borrowed my daughter's a couple years ago and used it maybe four or
five times to see what the shouting is about. Reminds me that I should
return it to them.

I'm not sure that their attractiveness is based on saving time, Brian.


That wasn't what attracted me to the ABM, I just don't like to beat up
some dough just to get a custom bread. I'm on my second machine, a
Regal, and it works very well. Latest loaf was a dessert bread, banana
nut with cinnamon. We don't eat white bread at all unless it's sourdough
so I make a lot of rye, whole wheat, and multi-grain breads, it's easy
enough with the ABM that I can load up the pan, set the timer, and
forget about it until it chimes. During that approximately 3 hours I can
be prepping for a meal, cleaning house, playing on the computer, etc
without worrying about what stage the bread is in. For me it's
convenience, not time.
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Old 25-09-2008, 02:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
"Brian Christiansen" wrote:
(snip)

straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.


It gives the perception of saving time, I think.


Depends what someone means by "that much time"... no, an ABM is not
going to save large blocks of time, but when making one loaf
conventionally compared to the the ABM at least 30 minutes will be
saved, probably more depending on how organized and how much of a slob
one is. Mostly ABMs save clean up because there's virtually no clean
up. ABMs also save signicant energy and allow baking during warm
weather without heating up ones abode. If one is going to bake
multiple loaves and want fancy schmancy configurations than
conventional baking is advantageous, but for one or even two basic
loaves the ABM beats conventional in both time, energy, and
convenience. Comparing an ABM to conventional bread baking is pretty
much the same as comparing an AWM (Automatic Washing Machine) to
washing laundry with a scrub board.

For one or two basic loaves it's a no-brainer, the ABM is the way to
go... when I want one loaf I don't even consider conventional baking,
I tske my ABM from my pantry, place it on the counter, plug it in,
toss in whatever ingredients, press a few touch pads, and in less than
ten minutes I'm baking bread. Sometimes I want a second loaf... soon
as the first is done I start another loaf, already have the
ingredients measured because I did that when I measured the
ingredients for the first loaf. But mostly it's just the one loaf,
and choosing the ABM is definitely a no-brainer. I've been using my
ABM like once a week for more than 15 years, never had a failure yet,
in fact it's always excellent bread.

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Old 25-09-2008, 02:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

Two minutes to put ingredients in and a further two minutes to clean pan
once loaf is finished, this is nothing compared to how it would take to
long to measure out ingredients/mix/knead (twice) and then clean up all
the mess you've made plus time spent washing hands xteen times . Bread
machine certainly saves me time !

Steve

Brian Christiansen wrote:
I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


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Old 25-09-2008, 04:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time


"Sheldon" wrote in message
...
"Brian *Pinhead* Christiansen" wrote:
I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. ?While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread
machine
truly saves.


If you need to ask than you truly know nothing about making bread, or
anything else.

I happen to make damn good bread.

Brian Christiansen




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Old 25-09-2008, 06:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time


"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
"Brian Christiansen" wrote:
(snip)
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


(snippety)
I borrowed my daughter's a couple years ago and used it maybe four or
five times to see what the shouting is about. Reminds me that I
should return it to them.

I'm not sure that their attractiveness is based on saving time, Brian.



My brother got an ABM for Christmas some years ago. The prospect of
working dough by hand was *not* his idea of a good time but he loves (who
doesn't?) the smell of bread baking. Like you, he used it maybe 4-5
times. The novelty wore off and it became just another thing to store. I
think he gave it away when he moved.

Pssst, Barb, if your daughter hasn't asked for it back after a couple of
years I'm guessing she didn't use it much, either

Jill


Last time Grandson # 1 was up - we made bread in the bread machine - it's
all he could talk about when he got home, I think it also made the 2nd grade
"tell time" (no show). After all HE made the bread.

:-)

Dimitri

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Old 25-09-2008, 07:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

On Sep 25, 5:48*am, val189 wrote:
On Sep 25, 2:44 am, "Brian Christiansen"





wrote:
I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. *While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread machine
truly saves time.


The bread certainly does not rise or bake any faster in a bread machine..


If you use a bread machine, you do not have to knead the bread, and that
saves about 10 minutes, but at least some of that savings is countered by
having to get the bread machine out of and back into storage, unless of
course you have the counter space to keep it set up all the time.


If you make bread by the sponge method, the sponge has to be started the day
before the actual baking (or at least that is the impression that I get from
several of the recipes that I looked at - I have never used that method),
but it isn't like you have to sit out in the kitchen watching the sponge
develop.


Also the impression that I get is that the development of the sponge is what
develops the flavor, and whether the kneading method is by hand or
mechanical in a bread machine or whatever really does not make that much
difference (though opinions seem to vary on this as well), but like with the
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.


Brian Christiansen


For me, it's the saving of money, it's the superior taste and
nutrition, it's the aroma which fills the house, it's never running
out of bread, it's the variety one can enjoy....I've had a machine for
almost 20 years and have never been sorry. *Sure, it takes a little
planning, but it's become part of the home routine.
I have two machines now, and there ARE days when both are hummin'.
* It takes about two minutes to dump in the ingredients. *Hell, I've
waited longer at the a supermkt bakery counter for someone to get me
bread, bag it, slap on a price and not say thank you.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I use one because I'm a lousy kneader. It's hard to recognize your
own limitations, but I've come to terms with this one.

I use one because I want to be sure of the ingredients in what I'm
eating. Everytime I would check the ingredients lists on the bread at
the store, they would change. I don't have time or energy to read
fine print ingredient lists on 5 different kinds of bread.

So I measure in the raw materials, let it mix, knead, and time the
rises. I actually take it out before the 3rd rise (I only make whole
wheat), let it rise in a loaf pan, and bake it in the oven. That
eliminates the big hole in the bottom from the kneading paddle.

Probably doesn't save any time. But I get great results and I know
what I'm eating.

Susan B.
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Old 25-09-2008, 07:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

On Sep 25, 2:44*am, "Brian Christiansen"
wrote:
I recently put together a toastmasters group presentation about making
bread. *While I was puting it together I got to wondering if a bread machine
truly saves time.

The bread certainly does not rise or bake any faster in a bread machine.

If you use a bread machine, you do not have to knead the bread, and that
saves about 10 minutes, but at least some of that savings is countered by
having to get the bread machine out of and back into storage, unless of
course you have the counter space to keep it set up all the time.

If you make bread by the sponge method, the sponge has to be started the day
before the actual baking (or at least that is the impression that I get from
several of the recipes that I looked at - I have never used that method),
but it isn't like you have to sit out in the kitchen watching the sponge
develop.

Also the impression that I get is that the development of the sponge is what
develops the flavor, and whether the kneading method is by hand or
mechanical in a bread machine or whatever really does not make that much
difference (though opinions seem to vary on this as well), but like with the
straight dough method, I dont think it really saves that much time.

Brian Christiansen


The main usefullness I found with a bread machine was that the results
were consistent, Doesn't really save time, unless you count that you
don't have to be there to punch the dough down once it's doubled, so
it gives me over an hour where I can go and do the shopping or some
yardwork, and don't have to worry that my dough will overproof. also,
I tend to add too much flour when kneading, so the machine saves me
from myself more than anything else.

I only use the dough cycle, punch down the dough, shape it, and put it
in a loaf pan so I have reasonable sized slices for sandwiches. That
means another half hour for the final proof, and 35-40 minutes in the
oven.

maxine in ri
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Old 25-09-2008, 07:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time

"maxine in ri" wrote in message

The main usefullness I found with a bread machine was that the results
were consistent, Doesn't really save time, unless you count that you
don't have to be there to punch the dough down once it's doubled, so
it gives me over an hour where I can go and do the shopping or some
yardwork, and don't have to worry that my dough will overproof. also,
I tend to add too much flour when kneading, so the machine saves me
from myself more than anything else.

That's the important thing. Quite good bread can be made automatically.
It's not qucker but it saves *your* time allowing you to do other
things. It is remarkable to think that the bread machine was invented in
Japan where bread is not a staple of diet!
--
James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

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Old 25-09-2008, 07:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Do bread machines really save that much time


"sueb" wrote

I use one because I'm a lousy kneader. It's hard to recognize your
own limitations, but I've come to terms with this one.


I use one because I want to be sure of the ingredients in what I'm
eating. Everytime I would check the ingredients lists on the bread at
the store, they would change. I don't have time or energy to read
fine print ingredient lists on 5 different kinds of bread.


So I measure in the raw materials, let it mix, knead, and time the
rises. I actually take it out before the 3rd rise (I only make whole
wheat), let it rise in a loaf pan, and bake it in the oven. That
eliminates the big hole in the bottom from the kneading paddle.


Probably doesn't save any time. But I get great results and I know
what I'm eating.



This makes sense, and might get me to use my breadmaker more often. What
killed me was the little tiny loaves. If I just used it for kneading, I
could make many little tiny loaves!




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