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Old 18-06-2008, 05:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:

NB: beef mince = ground beef

http://www.food24.com/Food24/Recipe/0,,12327,00.html

Fruity bobotie

Ingredients
3 red onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 x 10 cm piece fresh ginger, grated
45 ml oil
15 ml turmeric
30 ml garam masala
10 ml chilli powder
5 ml ground coriander
1 kg beef mince
2 x 410 g cans tomatoes
a handful of fresh coriander
200 g dried apricots, chopped
100 g cashew nuts
4 thick slices brown bread, cut into small cubes
30 ml chutney
salt and pepper to taste
6 eggs
500 ml cream
4 bay leaves

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180 C. In a large pan, heat oil and gently fry
onion, garlic, ginger and spices. Add the beef mince and brown. Add
tomatoes and fresh coriander. Add apricots, nuts, bread and chutney and
cook for three minutes. Add a little water if too thick. Season and scoop
the mince into an ovenproof dish. Lightly beat the eggs with the cream and
pop in the bay leaves. Pour over the mince until covered. Bake in the oven
for 15 to 20 minutes or until the topping has set and is slightly browned.

TIPS
Bobotie is traditionally served with yellow rice and raisins, chutneys and
tomato and onion sambal. Make a delicious sambal with diced mango,
cucumber, fresh coriander, chilli and a squeeze of lime juice. Make small,
individual boboties by preparing them in ramekins. You can use milk
instead of cream for the topping. Use fresh lemon leaves instead of fresh
bay leaves. Instead of beef mince, use lamb for a richer bobotie or
ostrich for one that is lower in fat.

Recipe From : FAIRLADY April 01, 2004

Anybody else have something that is traditional and/or typical to your
country/region that you are willing to share?

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...


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Old 18-06-2008, 05:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?






Do they really eat fish pie in S Africa?

Don't get me wrong I enjoy a bit of Haddock every now and then.

Creamy haddock pie

Recipe Type - Main

Main Ingredient - haddock

Ingredients
1.5kg haddock (skin removed)
50ml olive oil for frying
1 large onion
4 garlic cloves
125ml fresh milk
10ml fresh parsley, chopped
30g all purpose flour
1 tub smoked salmon cream cheese
125ml fresh cream (optional)

Method
Fry onions in oil until transparent and then add crushed garlic cloves.
Add flour and stir. Add milk bit by bit and stir. Add haddock to the pan
and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes and add the remaining ingredients. Layer
a baking dish with your favourite dough and bake the pie in the oven.

Submitted by - Elton Gordon

--

The house of the burning beet-Alan



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Old 18-06-2008, 07:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

ChattyCathy wrote:
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:


Is that pronounced "bo-bo-tee" ? Or "bo-bot-tee" ? or "bobo-tie"?
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Old 18-06-2008, 07:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 14:10:59 -0400, Goomba wrote:

ChattyCathy wrote:
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:


Is that pronounced "bo-bo-tee" ? Or "bo-bot-tee" ? or "bobo-tie"?


ba-boer-tie (sort of) grin
--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...

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Old 18-06-2008, 07:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:24:03 +0000, hahabogus wrote:


Do they really eat fish pie in S Africa?


Yes

Don't get me wrong I enjoy a bit of Haddock every now and then.


Oak smoked Haddock is quite popular here. It's available (frozen) in most
supermarkets, as is hake.

Kingklip is another favorite - it's a firm white fish, bit like cod but
not as 'fishy', IMHO.

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...



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Old 18-06-2008, 07:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Jun 18, 9:06*am, ChattyCathy wrote:
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:
[snip]

Traditional or typical to country/region, or maybe family? Here's the
simplest kind of southern China comfort food:

Lop Cheong Rice Pot

4 links lop cheong (aka Chinese sausage)
2 cups rice

Start rice in a pot. When the water has boiled, steam holes have
appeared, and the water level is at the level of the top surface of
the rice, lay the lop cheong on top. Cover tightly, turn the heat to
its lowest setting and cook for about 17 minutes. Leave covered,
remove from heat and let sit for about 10 minutes. Eat. -aem



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Old 18-06-2008, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 11:43:22 -0700, aem wrote:

On Jun 18, 9:06*am, ChattyCathy wrote:
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:
[snip]

Traditional or typical to country/region, or maybe family?


All of the above...g

Here's the
simplest kind of southern China comfort food:

Lop Cheong Rice Pot

4 links lop cheong (aka Chinese sausage)


As a boerewors (type of spicy sausage) lover I just had to google this to
see what goes into it. Looks like it is a type of pork sausage. Sounds
good to me... Have you made your own? If so, I would very much like to see
'your' recipe.

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...

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Old 18-06-2008, 08:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

ChattyCathy wrote in news:ACc6k.29811$8k.18518
@newsfe18.ams2:

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:24:03 +0000, hahabogus wrote:


Do they really eat fish pie in S Africa?


Yes

Don't get me wrong I enjoy a bit of Haddock every now and then.


Oak smoked Haddock is quite popular here. It's available (frozen) in

most
supermarkets, as is hake.

Kingklip is another favorite - it's a firm white fish, bit like cod but
not as 'fishy', IMHO.


I is just that I still have the occassional nightmare of the salmon pie
my newly married wife expected me to eat.

--

The house of the burning beet-Alan



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Old 18-06-2008, 08:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?


"ChattyCathy" wrote in message
...
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:

NB: beef mince = ground beef

http://www.food24.com/Food24/Recipe/0,,12327,00.html

Fruity bobotie

Ingredients
3 red onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 x 10 cm piece fresh ginger, grated
45 ml oil
15 ml turmeric
30 ml garam masala
10 ml chilli powder
5 ml ground coriander
1 kg beef mince
2 x 410 g cans tomatoes
a handful of fresh coriander
200 g dried apricots, chopped
100 g cashew nuts
4 thick slices brown bread, cut into small cubes
30 ml chutney
salt and pepper to taste
6 eggs
500 ml cream
4 bay leaves

Method:
Preheat the oven to 180 C. In a large pan, heat oil and gently fry
onion, garlic, ginger and spices. Add the beef mince and brown. Add
tomatoes and fresh coriander. Add apricots, nuts, bread and chutney and
cook for three minutes. Add a little water if too thick. Season and scoop
the mince into an ovenproof dish. Lightly beat the eggs with the cream and
pop in the bay leaves. Pour over the mince until covered. Bake in the oven
for 15 to 20 minutes or until the topping has set and is slightly browned.

TIPS
Bobotie is traditionally served with yellow rice and raisins, chutneys and
tomato and onion sambal. Make a delicious sambal with diced mango,
cucumber, fresh coriander, chilli and a squeeze of lime juice. Make small,
individual boboties by preparing them in ramekins. You can use milk
instead of cream for the topping. Use fresh lemon leaves instead of fresh
bay leaves. Instead of beef mince, use lamb for a richer bobotie or
ostrich for one that is lower in fat.

Recipe From : FAIRLADY April 01, 2004

Anybody else have something that is traditional and/or typical to your
country/region that you are willing to share?

Cathy,
OK, this looks great. I need to make this soon.

Any traditional SA vegetarian main course recipes you are aware of? We have
friends from SA coming for dinner in two weeks and I always try to find an
interesting veggie dish for them. A traditional SA dish would really make a
hit with them.

Thanks,
Jon


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Old 18-06-2008, 08:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?


"aem" wrote in message
...
On Jun 18, 9:06 am, ChattyCathy wrote:
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:
[snip]

Traditional or typical to country/region, or maybe family? Here's the
simplest kind of southern China comfort food:

Lop Cheong Rice Pot

4 links lop cheong (aka Chinese sausage)
2 cups rice

Start rice in a pot. When the water has boiled, steam holes have
appeared, and the water level is at the level of the top surface of
the rice, lay the lop cheong on top. Cover tightly, turn the heat to
its lowest setting and cook for about 17 minutes. Leave covered,
remove from heat and let sit for about 10 minutes. Eat. -aem

One of my favorite sausages. I've used lop cheong in steamed buns and stir
fry, and once in place of chorizo making clams steamed in white wine. Though
a much sweeter sausage, it was darned good.

Jon





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Old 18-06-2008, 08:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 19:13:23 GMT, hahabogus wrote:

ChattyCathy wrote in news:ACc6k.29811$8k.18518
:

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 16:24:03 +0000, hahabogus wrote:


Do they really eat fish pie in S Africa?


Yes

Don't get me wrong I enjoy a bit of Haddock every now and then.


Oak smoked Haddock is quite popular here. It's available (frozen) in

most
supermarkets, as is hake.

Kingklip is another favorite - it's a firm white fish, bit like cod but
not as 'fishy', IMHO.


I is just that I still have the occassional nightmare of the salmon pie
my newly married wife expected me to eat.


There is a Russian dish, koulebiaka, or the French coulibiac, that is
a long sort of salmon pie. Quite a nice dish, actually.

Boron
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Old 18-06-2008, 08:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 15:20:25 -0400, "Zeppo"
wrote:


Any traditional SA vegetarian main course recipes you are aware of? We have
friends from SA coming for dinner in two weeks and I always try to find an
interesting veggie dish for them. A traditional SA dish would really make a
hit with them.

Thanks,
Jon


I know you want to honor your friends, but in my experience folks from
abroad often would rather try the dishes of the country they are
visiting. They can get the food of their own country where they
live...how about giving them some traditional food of our country?
Assuming you are from the US, of course..

Christine
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Old 18-06-2008, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Jun 18, 12:20*pm, "Zeppo" wrote:
"ChattyCathy" wrote in message

...



Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:


NB: beef mince = ground beef


http://www.food24.com/Food24/Recipe/0,,12327,00.html


Fruity bobotie


Ingredients
3 red onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 x 10 cm piece fresh ginger, grated
45 ml oil
15 ml turmeric
30 ml garam masala
10 ml chilli powder
5 ml ground coriander
1 kg beef mince
2 x 410 g cans tomatoes
a handful of fresh coriander
200 g dried apricots, chopped
100 g cashew nuts
4 thick slices brown bread, cut into small cubes
30 ml chutney
salt and pepper to taste
6 eggs
500 ml cream
4 bay leaves


Method:
Preheat the oven to 180 C. In a large pan, heat oil and gently fry
onion, garlic, ginger and spices. Add the beef mince and brown. Add
tomatoes and fresh coriander. Add apricots, nuts, bread and chutney and
cook for three minutes. Add a little water if too thick. Season and scoop
the mince into an ovenproof dish. Lightly beat the eggs with the cream and
pop in the bay leaves. Pour over the mince until covered. Bake in the oven
for 15 to 20 minutes or until the topping has set and is slightly browned.


TIPS
Bobotie is traditionally served with yellow rice and raisins, chutneys and
tomato and onion sambal. Make a delicious sambal with diced mango,
cucumber, fresh coriander, chilli and a squeeze of lime juice. Make small,
individual boboties by preparing them in ramekins. You can use milk
instead of cream for the topping. Use fresh lemon leaves instead of fresh
bay leaves. Instead of beef mince, use lamb for a richer bobotie or
ostrich for one that is lower in fat.


Recipe From : FAIRLADY April 01, 2004


Anybody else have something that is traditional and/or typical to your
country/region that you are willing to share?


Cathy,
OK, this looks great. I need to make this soon.

Any traditional SA vegetarian main course recipes you are aware of? We have
friends from SA coming for dinner in two weeks and I always try to find an
interesting veggie dish for them. A traditional SA dish would really make a
hit with them.

Thanks,
Jon- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I agree with Christine's post. When we had family from Italy visit us,
we made a turkey dinner, just like Thanksgiving- they loved it!!
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Old 18-06-2008, 08:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 15:20:25 -0400, Zeppo wrote:


"ChattyCathy" wrote in message
...
Here's mine: Fruity bobotie - a tradtional South African dish:


Cathy,
OK, this looks great. I need to make this soon.


I hope you enjoy it...

Any traditional SA vegetarian main course recipes you are aware of? We
have friends from SA coming for dinner in two weeks and I always try to
find an interesting veggie dish for them. A traditional SA dish would
really make a hit with them.


We're rather big 'meat eaters' in this family, but here's a local recipe
site I like a lot. They have a section with some nice 'veggie dishes'.
(Don't ask me why they called it "Funky Munky" grin but I've tried quite
a few of the recipes and they've all been good...) BTW, I hope your
friends can eat eggs and/or cheese, because some recipes have one or the
other (or both).

http://funkymunky.co.za/veg.html

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Egg tastes better when it's not on your face...

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Old 18-06-2008, 08:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Traditional recipes?

On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 12:33:27 -0700 (PDT), merryb
wrote:


I agree with Christine's post. When we had family from Italy visit us,
we made a turkey dinner, just like Thanksgiving- they loved it!!


When my Australian friend visited me a few weeks ago, I gave her pot
roast. She had never, ever had it. Yes, she eats a lot of beef in
Australia, but it was usually a rib roast, or steaks. Never, ever pot
roast...she was asking me what it was.

She adored the pot roast.

I couldn't really give her any New Mexican food, since she didn't like
spicy food. However, we ate at the restaurant at the Indian Pueblo
Cultural Center here in ABQ, and she had Indian Fry Bread... She
loved that too.. A few days later, I introduced her to
sopapillas...and again, she was in love with them.

I was going to give her the traditional Thanksgiving dinner, as it is
so very American, but we ran out of time....too much sightseeing, etc.
Another reason I don't like to give folks the food of their own
country is that I probably can't do it even half as well as they can
get at home... Plus..travel is about new experiences...at least for
me it is.

Christine, who ate Rocky Mountain Oysters in Colorado


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