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Old 20-05-2008, 04:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat

Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.

I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).

I found an old thread where Sheldon I believe mentions the best time
to grill burgers is like within an hour after your grind them, is this
true? I have no problem with this. I can easily buy the meat that day
or before from the grocer and just grind it prior to grilling.

What are the best cuts of beef for grilling hamburgers? I can think of
Chuck. Would that be the best? What about Top Round (which Sheldon
mentioned in the same thread).

The grinder would also open up more possibilities such as homemade
sausage, maybe even turkey for turkey burgers (but would seem easier
to just buy the cut of beef).

If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.

I see myself getting real immersed into this whole cooking bit.

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Old 20-05-2008, 07:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat


"meatnub" wrote in message
...
Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.

I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).


I priced the Waring Pro at Dillards last week, and I also took it out
of the box, read the book, looked at how it is made and how it works.
(Not because of Sheldon's recommendation, because it was the best
looking electric grinder there.) I really like it. For $99.00? A steal. I
will get one, probably online, the best value I can get.

I did the same with the Waring Pro meat slicer, it is like a mini-deli
slicer, perfect size for what I want to do. Also $99 at Dillard's.


I found an old thread where Sheldon I believe mentions the best time
to grill burgers is like within an hour after your grind them, is this
true? I have no problem with this. I can easily buy the meat that day
or before from the grocer and just grind it prior to grilling.


Health-wise it certainly is the best time. The longer meat had been
ground or chopped, the farther into the oxidation process it will
be. Read up on free radicals and their role in enabling mutagens
to **** us up.


I see myself getting real immersed into this whole cooking bit.


It's great fun. It's the best chemistry set EVER. Except of course,
nothing blows up. Usually, anyway.


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Old 20-05-2008, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"meatnub" wrote in message
...
Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.

I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).

I found an old thread where Sheldon I believe mentions the best time
to grill burgers is like within an hour after your grind them, is this
true? I have no problem with this. I can easily buy the meat that day
or before from the grocer and just grind it prior to grilling.

What are the best cuts of beef for grilling hamburgers? I can think of
Chuck. Would that be the best? What about Top Round (which Sheldon
mentioned in the same thread).

The grinder would also open up more possibilities such as homemade
sausage, maybe even turkey for turkey burgers (but would seem easier
to just buy the cut of beef).

If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.

I see myself getting real immersed into this whole cooking bit.


The whole trick is to keep the meat as cold as possible. That way it doesn't
gunk up the grinder.


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Old 20-05-2008, 08:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat

"cybercat" wrote:
"meatnub" wrote in message

...

Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.


I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).


I priced the Waring Pro at Dillards last week, and I also took it out
of the box, read the book, looked at how it is made and how it works.
(Not because of Sheldon's recommendation, because it was the best
looking electric grinder there.) I really like it. For $99.00? A steal. I
will get one, probably online, the best value I can get.

I did the same with the Waring Pro meat slicer, it is like a mini-deli
slicer, perfect size for what I want to do. Also $99 at Dillard's.


The $99 one is the small one, really too small... get the larger one
at Williams-Sonoma - $160.
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Old 20-05-2008, 09:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat

meatnub wrote:

Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.


We hear it every month. I guess it's bound to reach someone new
when he talks about it so often. Sheldon is the queen of ground
beef (and King of Alpo recipes).

If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.


Grinder attachment for the Kitchenaid works like a charm at 1/4th
the price, assuming you already have a KA.

-sw


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Old 20-05-2008, 09:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Kswck" wrote:
"meatnub" wrote in message

...





Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.


I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).


I found an old thread where Sheldon I believe mentions the best time
to grill burgers is like within an hour after your grind them, is this
true? I have no problem with this. I can easily buy the meat that day
or before from the grocer and just grind it prior to grilling.


What are the best cuts of beef for grilling hamburgers? I can think of
Chuck. Would that be the best? What about Top Round (which Sheldon
mentioned in the same thread).


The grinder would also open up more possibilities such as homemade
sausage, maybe even turkey for turkey burgers (but would seem easier
to just buy the cut of beef).


If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.


I see myself getting real immersed into this whole cooking bit.


The whole trick is to keep the meat as cold as possible. That way it doesn't
gunk up the grinder.


Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., especially the grinder head. After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.

A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.


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Old 21-05-2008, 07:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat


"Sheldon" wrote in message
...

snip

Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., especially the grinder head. After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.

A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.



Good advice.

I have a top round (London Broil) in the freezer - I didn't have time to
grind it when I purchased it. It is too lean I'm going to try the EVOO
trick. Hmmm maybe some garlic ground into the beef.

At $1.68 (Albertsons special) per pound it makes pretty good "ground round"

Dimitri

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Old 21-05-2008, 07:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
meatnub wrote:

Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.


We hear it every month. I guess it's bound to reach someone new
when he talks about it so often. Sheldon is the queen of ground
beef (and King of Alpo recipes).

If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.


Grinder attachment for the Kitchenaid works like a charm at 1/4th
the price, assuming you already have a KA.

-sw


I found an unused one at the Church Rummage Sale a few years ago for $5.00 I
think it's saved me $500.00 on ground round & ground chicken.

I ALMOST felt like I should go to confession for stealing.

Dimitri

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Old 21-05-2008, 07:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Dimitri" wrote
I have a top round (London Broil) in the freezer - I didn't have time to
grind it when I purchased it. It is too lean I'm going to try the EVOO
trick. Hmmm maybe some garlic ground into the beef.

At $1.68 (Albertsons special) per pound it makes pretty good "ground
round"


This is precisely why I want a meat grinder. Walking by the lovely London
Broils
at under $2 a pound and paying $3 for fatty preground hamburger.


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Old 21-05-2008, 09:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat

On May 21, 2:46�pm, "cybercat" wrote:
"Dimitri" wrote

I have a top round (London Broil) in the freezer - I didn't have time to
grind it when I purchased it. �It is too lean I'm going to try the EVOO
trick. Hmmm maybe some garlic ground into the beef.


At $1.68 (Albertsons special) per pound it makes pretty good "ground
round"


This is precisely why I want a meat grinder. Walking by the lovely London
Broils
at under $2 a pound and paying $3 for fatty preground [MYSTERY MEAT] hamburger.



You've been threatening to buy a grinder for over a year... noo!




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Old 21-05-2008, 09:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Sheldon" wrote:

You've been threatening to buy a grinder for over a year... noo!


Your point? I will buy one when I am good and ready.



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Old 21-05-2008, 09:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On May 21, 2:19�pm, "Dimitri" wrote:
"Sheldon" wrote in message

...

snip





Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., �especially the grinder head. �After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. �The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.


A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. �After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. �I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.


Good advice.

I have a top round (London Broil) in the freezer - I didn't have time to
grind it when I purchased it. �It is too lean I'm going to try the EVOO
trick. Hmmm maybe some garlic ground into the beef.


I don't recommend grinding garlic cloves into meat, it will all stay
in one place, and when the meat is cooked the garlic will remain raw
(blech).... instead season the meat by sprinkling with garlic powder
before grinding... this works for meat loaf or sausage (meat loaf is
sausage) however for a burger it's better to season with garlic powder
or garlic salt after cooking... if that's what you want, personally I
think garlic burgers are TIAD... why make the effort to grind good
meat if it's gonna reek from garlic so that you can't taste the meat.

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Old 21-05-2008, 09:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grinding meat

On May 20, 4:40*pm, Sheldon wrote:
"Kswck" wrote:
"meatnub" wrote in message


...


Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.


I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).


I found an old thread where Sheldon I believe mentions the best time
to grill burgers is like within an hour after your grind them, is this
true? I have no problem with this. I can easily buy the meat that day
or before from the grocer and just grind it prior to grilling.


What are the best cuts of beef for grilling hamburgers? I can think of
Chuck. Would that be the best? What about Top Round (which Sheldon
mentioned in the same thread).


The grinder would also open up more possibilities such as homemade
sausage, maybe even turkey for turkey burgers (but would seem easier
to just buy the cut of beef).


If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.


I see myself getting real immersed into this whole cooking bit.


The whole trick is to keep the meat as cold as possible. That way it doesn't
gunk up the grinder.


Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., *especially the grinder head. *After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. *The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.

A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. *After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. *I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


On May 20, 4:40 pm, Sheldon wrote:
The whole trick is to keep the meat as cold as possible. That way it doesn't
gunk up the grinder.


Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., especially the grinder head. After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.

A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thank you very much for that info! I saw that (chilling the meat and
grinder parts) mentioned on about.com and was a little skeptical about
that at first, glad to see there is truth to it.

I am interested in making home made sausage too, have some cook books
coming, hopefully some recipes will be in there for that.

I don't have dogs, don't hunt, so beyond sausage and burgers, not
really sure what else the grinder would be of use, but I guess just to
make homemade burgers without buying mystery meat pays for itself.
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Old 21-05-2008, 09:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 9,315
Default Grinding meat

On May 21, 4:34�pm, meatnub wrote:
On May 20, 4:40�pm, Sheldon wrote:





"Kswck" wrote:
"meatnub" wrote in message


....


Thanks to Sheldon for mentioning meat grinding and the Waring Pro meat
grinder.


I just never thought you could do this at home and I am very intrigued
and most likely will end up purchasing the above grinder (already
purchased Waring's Belgian Waffle maker).


I found an old thread where Sheldon I believe mentions the best time
to grill burgers is like within an hour after your grind them, is this
true? I have no problem with this. I can easily buy the meat that day
or before from the grocer and just grind it prior to grilling.


What are the best cuts of beef for grilling hamburgers? I can think of
Chuck. Would that be the best? What about Top Round (which Sheldon
mentioned in the same thread).


The grinder would also open up more possibilities such as homemade
sausage, maybe even turkey for turkey burgers (but would seem easier
to just buy the cut of beef).


If anyone has any advice especially on different grinding machines I'd
appreciate it.


I see myself getting real immersed into this whole cooking bit.


The whole trick is to keep the meat as cold as possible. That way it doesn't
gunk up the grinder.


Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., �especially the grinder head. �After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. �The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.


A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. �After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. �I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


On May 20, 4:40 pm, Sheldon wrote:





The whole trick is to keep the meat as cold as possible. That way it doesn't
gunk up the grinder.


Put everything in the freezer to chill, the bowls, the cutting board,
etc., �especially the grinder head. �After slicing the meat, before
grinding, place into the freezer for 15 minutes to chill and firm up.
Have all your wrappings ready in advance too, your counter tops wiped
down and cleared also, you don't want to leave meat out at room
temperature any longer than necessary... it's a good idea to do bulk
meat meat grinding in early morning, the coolest part of the day.
It's smart to place your ground meat back in the fridge while you
clean up, you don't want the dirty grinder and utensils lying about
longer than necessary either. �The most difficult part about grinding
is in the planning, and always *safety* of course.


A good practice is to trim some of the large clumps of fat from your
chuck, round, or whatever beef and after slicing into strips coat meat
with some mild olive oil, replaces the fat with cholesterol free fat
while it lubes the grinder for a better grind. �After some practice
you will learn to judge fat content pretty accurately by eye. �I don't
save the fat trimmings, I really have no use for them, instead I toss
them out into the yard, the crows will carry them off within three
minutes after I shut the back door.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Thank you very much for that info! I saw that (chilling the meat and
grinder parts) mentioned on about.com and was a little skeptical about
that at first, glad to see there is truth to it.

I am interested in making home made sausage too, have some cook books
coming, hopefully some recipes will be in there for that.

I don't have dogs, don't hunt, so beyond sausage and burgers, not
really sure what else the grinder would be of use, but I guess just to
make homemade burgers without buying mystery meat pays for itself


Bread/cracker crumbs, nuts, cheese, any vegetable for meat loaf, fish
for fish cakes, cooked meat for hash/pasta filling, and of course a
grinder is the best way to prepare raw potatoes for latkes. I
recommend, for anyone, to begin by learning to grind plain meat for
burgers, don't try anything exotic until you learn proper food
handling practices... I recommend reading Kutas' book cover to cover
at least three times before attempting any sausage.

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Old 21-05-2008, 10:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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meatnub wrote:

I don't have dogs, don't hunt, so beyond sausage and burgers, not
really sure what else the grinder would be of use, but I guess just to
make homemade burgers without buying mystery meat pays for itself.


I used to make pesto using a hand-operated meat grinder
before I got the Braun stick blender with the food
processor attachment.

A few days ago on TV, I saw Lidia Bastianich make spaghetti
by running the dough through a meat grinder with a fine
plate and the cutter blade removed. That was clever!
It got me to thinking maybe there would be demand for
pasta extrusion plates designed to fit popular meat
grinders. A custom-made plate for pasta could extrude
hollow pasta like macaroni.

The plate could extend through the retaining ring,
so that as the pasta is extruded you could run a knife
flush against the plate to cut the pasta as it comes
out.


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