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Old 15-01-2008, 01:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339


--
Best
Greg




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Old 15-01-2008, 02:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

On Jan 15, 8:52*am, "Gregory Morrow"
wrote:
Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339

--
Best
Greg


Thanks! I ordered a print of that. Of course the neighborhood has
changed a bit since then...

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Old 15-01-2008, 07:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

Gregory Morrow wrote:
Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339




I have a photo, circa 1920, of my dad and a co-worker at the Wonder
Market in New Bedford, MA. The store was smaller than the one featured
and there were fewer canned goods but things like apples and potatoes in
various barrels. The most interesting things is the shelf prices.
Most things (canned soup, bars of soap) were around $.05. Cereals were
~$.15 a package.

Interesting history lesson.

gloria p
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Old 15-01-2008, 10:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

Puester wrote:
Gregory Morrow wrote:
Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339


I have a photo, circa 1920, of my dad and a co-worker at the Wonder
Market in New Bedford, MA. The store was smaller than the one featured
and there were fewer canned goods but things like apples and potatoes in
various barrels. The most interesting things is the shelf prices. Most
things (canned soup, bars of soap) were around $.05. Cereals were ~$.15
a package.

Interesting history lesson.

gloria p


I loved the picture of that Neumann Grocery, but was quite surprised by
the variety of fruits and veg available in Detroit way back then! Did
you notice all the pineapples, artichokes, star fruit, bananas? It seems
transport of produce from far distances was well established and the
fruit all looked in fabulous condition.
Goomba
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Old 15-01-2008, 10:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

One time on Usenet, Goomba38 said:
Puester wrote:
Gregory Morrow wrote:
Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339


I have a photo, circa 1920, of my dad and a co-worker at the Wonder
Market in New Bedford, MA. The store was smaller than the one featured
and there were fewer canned goods but things like apples and potatoes in
various barrels. The most interesting things is the shelf prices. Most
things (canned soup, bars of soap) were around $.05. Cereals were ~$.15
a package.

Interesting history lesson.

gloria p


I loved the picture of that Neumann Grocery, but was quite surprised by
the variety of fruits and veg available in Detroit way back then! Did
you notice all the pineapples, artichokes, star fruit, bananas? It seems
transport of produce from far distances was well established and the
fruit all looked in fabulous condition.


And asparagus! Not only the fresh stuff, but lots of canned (ugh). The
prices seemed a bit high for 1910 though or am I off base on that..?

--
Jani in WA


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Old 15-01-2008, 10:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

Puester wrote on Tue, 15 Jan 2008 19:27:20 GMT:

P Gregory Morrow wrote:
?? Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:
??
?? http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339
??
P I have a photo, circa 1920, of my dad and a co-worker at the
P Wonder Market in New Bedford, MA. The store was smaller
P than the one featured and there were fewer canned goods but
P things like apples and potatoes in various barrels. The
P most interesting things is the shelf prices. Most things
P (canned soup, bars of soap) were around $.05. Cereals were
P ~$.15 a package.

P Interesting history lesson.

It certainly is tho' the CPI has increased by a factor of about
10 since then. The prices would make me suspect that factor was
really more like 20! Another thing that interests me is that the
smallest coin of those days was the penny as it is now. It's
like having no coins smaller than a dime but people seemed to
function well enough.

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

E-mail, with obvious alterations:
not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 15-01-2008, 10:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

On Jan 15, 3:35 pm, "Felice" wrote:
"Puester" wrote in message

...



Gregory Morrow wrote:
Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:


http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339


I have a photo, circa 1920, of my dad and a co-worker at the Wonder Market
in New Bedford, MA. The store was smaller than the one featured and
there were fewer canned goods but things like apples and potatoes in
various barrels. The most interesting things is the shelf prices. Most
things (canned soup, bars of soap) were around $.05. Cereals were ~$.15 a
package.


Interesting history lesson.


gloria p


Also interesting: the 1920 Census says the national average income was about
$1,500 a year. Somebody else can do the "how many hours for a can of soup"
calculation!

Felice


Well with some very rough assumptions.
Working weeks - 50
Working days in a week - 6
Working hours in a day - 10
Income - $1500

Hourly wage= Income/(Weeks*Days*Hours)
= $0.50

So it should only take less than 15 minutes work to buy a can of
soup.

It would probably take about 6-8 minutes at minumum wage to buy a can
of soup in Ontario today.




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Old 15-01-2008, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

Little Malice wrote:

I loved the picture of that Neumann Grocery, but was quite surprised by
the variety of fruits and veg available in Detroit way back then! Did
you notice all the pineapples, artichokes, star fruit, bananas? It seems
transport of produce from far distances was well established and the
fruit all looked in fabulous condition.


And asparagus! Not only the fresh stuff, but lots of canned (ugh). The
prices seemed a bit high for 1910 though or am I off base on that..?

looking around wondering who she's asking?
Like *I* would know? It was wayyyyyyyyyyy before MY time! Hrrrumph!!
LOL LOL LOL
But yeah, Asparagus seemed to be very big. The fresh stalks were fat,
weren't they??
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Old 15-01-2008, 11:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...


"Little Malice" wrote in message
...
One time on Usenet, "Gregory Morrow"
said:

Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339


Wow, I had no idea Libby's had been around that long...

--
Jani in WA


I've got a few old magazines (McCall's, Good Housekeeping, etc.) from back
then. Looking at the one from 1914 is really interesting, I was also
surprised how many items available back then are still around.


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Old 16-01-2008, 12:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

One time on Usenet, Goomba38 said:
Little Malice wrote:

I loved the picture of that Neumann Grocery, but was quite surprised by
the variety of fruits and veg available in Detroit way back then! Did
you notice all the pineapples, artichokes, star fruit, bananas? It seems
transport of produce from far distances was well established and the
fruit all looked in fabulous condition.


And asparagus! Not only the fresh stuff, but lots of canned (ugh). The
prices seemed a bit high for 1910 though or am I off base on that..?

looking around wondering who she's asking?
Like *I* would know? It was wayyyyyyyyyyy before MY time! Hrrrumph!!
LOL LOL LOL


Heh! No, no, I was thinking someone else might have a better grasp of
U.S. history than I do. :-)

But yeah, Asparagus seemed to be very big. The fresh stalks were fat,
weren't they??


Defininately -- those would be so good roasted! Last March we
had roasted asparagus wrapped in bacon at Disneyland; it was
wonderful...

--
Jani in WA
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Old 16-01-2008, 01:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 14:45:28 -0800 (PST), John Kane
wrote:

On Jan 15, 3:35 pm, "Felice" wrote:
"Puester" wrote in message


Also interesting: the 1920 Census says the national average income was about
$1,500 a year. Somebody else can do the "how many hours for a can of soup"
calculation!

Felice


Well with some very rough assumptions.
Working weeks - 50
Working days in a week - 6
Working hours in a day - 10
Income - $1500

Hourly wage= Income/(Weeks*Days*Hours)
= $0.50

So it should only take less than 15 minutes work to buy a can of
soup.

It would probably take about 6-8 minutes at minumum wage to buy a can
of soup in Ontario today.


Not questioning your math, but I wonder if how many wage workers back
then got 2 weeks vacation back then?

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Old 16-01-2008, 07:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Grocery Shopping c. 1910...

On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 07:52:29 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
fired up random neurons and
synapses to opine:

Neumann Grocery in Detroit, Michigan:

http://www.shorpy.com/node/2339


I have a photo of my maternal grandfather's "General Merchandise"
store at Rodeo, NM ca. 1900 with a sign above the door that says,
"General Merchandise C.W. Hopkins & Co." I also have one of my
mother's maternal great-grandfather's store in NM in a town that used
to be called Apache, ca. 1890. "J.W. Marken Mercantile." Both sides
of the maternal line homesteaded when NM was still a territory.

OB: My grandmother's friend, Norma Watson's, buttermilk biscuit
recipe:

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Buttermilk Biscuits

breads

2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
5 1/3 tablespoons butter
buttermilk

Preheat oven to 450 F. Combine first four ingredients. Work chilled
butter nto dough with pastry blender. Add buttermilk to make a soft
dough. Put on floured work surface and knead slightly. Pat out to
about 1/2" and cut rounds. Bake 15 minutes or until golden.

Contributor: Norma Watson

Yield: 12 servings

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
--
"If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

-- Duncan Hines


To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"


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