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Old 25-12-2007, 05:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?

--
Wayne Boatwright

Date: Sunday, December 23rd,2007

*******************************************
Today is: Fourth Sunday of Advent
Countdown 'til Christmas
15hrs 57mins 34secs
*******************************************
I made it foolproof. They are making
better fools!

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Old 25-12-2007, 06:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Dec 25, 12:39�pm, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. �I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. �The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


Even though from the same fruit and even used together in many of the
same recipes nutmeg and mace (aril) are very different in flavor, as
different as cinnamon and cloves. Even though there is some overlap I
use nutmeg mostly for baking but I use mace mainly for cooking,
usually blade mace in soups and stews.
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Old 25-12-2007, 06:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 10:53:59a, kilikini meant to say...

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the
seed and mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in
recipes as specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had
run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference
in flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?


I think mace has a stronger flavor, too, which is why I wonder when I'm
watching a cooking show and the host grates fresh nutmeg into the dish,
the outside hasn't already been grated. Mace, to me, is almost more of
a 5-spice/ginger type thing. Does that make sense?

kili




Hmm... I never thought about it having a multi-dimensional flavor. I'll
have to taste test that!

--
Wayne Boatwright

Date: Sunday, December 23rd,2007

*******************************************
Today is: Fourth Sunday of Advent
Countdown 'til Christmas
15hrs 57mins 34secs
*******************************************
I made it foolproof. They are making
better fools!
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Old 25-12-2007, 06:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?


Mace is "spicier" has more bite or kick imo, but i like it so much i use
it as a form of incense, i think i like the aroma better than the flavour.

Nutmeg on the other hand seems mild and "smooth" not spicy to me.
--
JL
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Old 25-12-2007, 06:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 11:18:43a, Joseph Littleshoes meant to say...

Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed
and mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?


Mace is "spicier" has more bite or kick imo, but i like it so much i use
it as a form of incense, i think i like the aroma better than the
flavour.


Yes, that's it. It is "spicier". How do you use it as incense, over a
small piece of charcoal?

Nutmeg on the other hand seems mild and "smooth" not spicy to me.


It does have a nice aromatic quality to it, though. I especially like it
in custards.

JL




--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
I made it foolproof. They are making
better fools!


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Old 25-12-2007, 07:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article 4,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


Mace is stronger, and to my mind, has sharper edges. Nutmeg is for when
you want delicacy. It makes a good Secret Ingredient for when you want
to drive people nuts guessing what that other flavour is.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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Old 25-12-2007, 07:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Miche wrote:
In article 4,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


Mace is stronger, and to my mind, has sharper edges. Nutmeg is for when
you want delicacy. It makes a good Secret Ingredient for when you want
to drive people nuts guessing what that other flavour is.


Drive people "nuts". Good pun Miche
--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Garlic: the element without which life as we know it would be impossible
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Old 25-12-2007, 08:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 11:18:43a, Joseph Littleshoes meant to say...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed
and mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?


Mace is "spicier" has more bite or kick imo, but i like it so much i use
it as a form of incense, i think i like the aroma better than the
flavour.



Yes, that's it. It is "spicier". How do you use it as incense, over a
small piece of charcoal?


No! if necessary, if i am out of the mace incense sold at a local store
i will gently heat without carbonizing the powdered mace. But the
incense i buy, while definitely, top note, mace, has under notes of
cinnamon and i think, bayberry, possibly some clove also.



Nutmeg on the other hand seems mild and "smooth" not spicy to me.



It does have a nice aromatic quality to it, though. I especially like it
in custards.


Im more likely to use nutmeg in cooking than i am mace, i make a very
nice garlic cream sauce with just a hint of nutmeg, though i have done
lamb roasts and stews with mace to good effect. I also like it with
carrots and cauliflower.

I have had various sweets in which mace was used to good effect, a
pumpkin pie especially, but some stewed fruit dishes i have had also. I
have read of people using mace in a chocolate sauce but have never done so.

Combines well with cumin IMO and often goes in my sage and onion bread
stuffing.
--
JL


JL





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Old 25-12-2007, 08:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article ,
ChattyCathy wrote:

Miche wrote:
In article 4,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed
and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


Mace is stronger, and to my mind, has sharper edges. Nutmeg is for when
you want delicacy. It makes a good Secret Ingredient for when you want
to drive people nuts guessing what that other flavour is.


Drive people "nuts". Good pun Miche


Goodness! That was totally unintentional. No, really!

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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Old 25-12-2007, 09:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.


What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


I have not figured out how to grind them separately from the
nut, so if either is called for in a recipe and assuming I'm grinding
it myself, I end up with a mixture.

With respect to the pre-ground versions that come in spice jars,
Pre-ground nutmeg has a very characteristic non-fresh-ground
nutmeg flavor that pervades anything it's added to, whereas
mace is a little different, and doesn't have that "sameness"
to it -- probably just because it's a little less familiar of
a flavor.

Steve


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Old 25-12-2007, 09:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
3.184...
I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.
It's no surprise that they taste vastly different.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


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Old 25-12-2007, 09:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 12:07:16p, Miche meant to say...

In article 4,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed
and mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


Mace is stronger, and to my mind, has sharper edges. Nutmeg is for when
you want delicacy. It makes a good Secret Ingredient for when you want
to drive people nuts guessing what that other flavour is.

Miche


Good point, Miche. I find I use a little bit of nutmeg in a lot of things
that I probably wouldn't use mace in.

--
Wayne Boatwright

Date: Sunday, December 23rd,2007

*******************************************
Today is: Fourth Sunday of Advent
Countdown 'til Christmas
15hrs 57mins 34secs
*******************************************
I made it foolproof. They are making
better fools!
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Old 25-12-2007, 10:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 01:26:22p, Joseph Littleshoes meant to say...

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 11:18:43a, Joseph Littleshoes meant to
say...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the
seed and mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in
recipes as specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had
run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference
in flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?


Mace is "spicier" has more bite or kick imo, but i like it so much i
use it as a form of incense, i think i like the aroma better than the
flavour.



Yes, that's it. It is "spicier". How do you use it as incense, over a
small piece of charcoal?


No! if necessary, if i am out of the mace incense sold at a local store
i will gently heat without carbonizing the powdered mace. But the
incense i buy, while definitely, top note, mace, has under notes of
cinnamon and i think, bayberry, possibly some clove also.


Umm... The incense you buy sounds really nice. I don't think I've ever
see one with that particular combination.

Nutmeg on the other hand seems mild and "smooth" not spicy to me.



It does have a nice aromatic quality to it, though. I especially like
it in custards.


Im more likely to use nutmeg in cooking than i am mace, i make a very
nice garlic cream sauce with just a hint of nutmeg, though i have done
lamb roasts and stews with mace to good effect. I also like it with
carrots and cauliflower.


All good choices. I often use nutmeg with pork roast, along with garlic
adn pepper.

I have had various sweets in which mace was used to good effect, a
pumpkin pie especially, but some stewed fruit dishes i have had also. I
have read of people using mace in a chocolate sauce but have never done
so.


I use both netmeg and mace in my pumpkiin pie, and have used mace with
stewed fruit. I don't think I've ever tasted it in combination with
chocolate.

Combines well with cumin IMO and often goes in my sage and onion bread
stuffing.


That would be interesting. I wonder how that would work with my cornbread
dressing, which is predominately sage and poultry seasoning flavored, and
onion and celery, of course.


--
Wayne Boatwright

Date: Sunday, December 23rd,2007

*******************************************
Today is: Fourth Sunday of Advent
Countdown 'til Christmas
15hrs 57mins 34secs
*******************************************
I made it foolproof. They are making
better fools!
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Old 25-12-2007, 10:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Tue, 25 Dec 2007 17:39:12 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.


I can't stand nutmeg, even in tiny amounts. Mace is fine.

--
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Old 25-12-2007, 10:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Oh pshaw, on Tue 25 Dec 2007 02:58:57p, Michael Kuettner meant to say...


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
3.184...
I know the physical difference between the two, that nutmeg is the seed

and
mace is the lacy covering surrounding it. I use both in recipes as
specified, and I have subbed one for the other when I had run out.

What I'm interested in is your personal perception of the difference in
flavor. The main difference I perceive is that mace has a somewhat
stronger flavor and is, of course, lighter in color.

Anybody?

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.
It's no surprise that they taste vastly different.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner




I already stated that. I wondered what other people felt about the
didfference in flavor, not just that fact that it's different.

--
Wayne Boatwright

Date: Sunday, December 23rd,2007

*******************************************
Today is: Fourth Sunday of Advent
Countdown 'til Christmas
15hrs 57mins 34secs
*******************************************
I made it foolproof. They are making
better fools!


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