General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #46 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2007, 04:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,971
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Sat 29 Dec 2007 08:58:59p, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Sat 29 Dec 2007 08:30:18a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 08:43:33a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright

Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a
substitute for the other.

I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors

are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing
wouldn't be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright

True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never

an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of
people do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.


Yep, you're right, and I usually have all of those in the house.

There
have been a few times when I've run out of something and didn't know
it. Subbing was the only alternative. Now, if I were making
Springerle, I would definitely NOT substitute fennel seed for anise
seed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright

That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Ari, you have lived in many different places. I've always been curious
about where you were from originally.


LOL What and give away my secrets??? Oh OK....originally from
Maastricht, Limburg, the Netherlands. And no I can't stand Limburger
cheese. When my mother gets some I try to leave the house LOL.


Thanks, Ari. Oddly, for some reason I thought you might be from the
Netherlands. Don't really know why. Perhaps it was something you said at
some point that I had stored away in my head. OTOH, David and I both love
Limburger cheese, although we don't have it often. I just bought some, as
we always do have some on New Year's Eve, regardless what else we have. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Saturday, 12(XII)/29(XXIX)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
2dys 3hrs
*******************************************
I've seen the future and I leave it
all behind
*******************************************


  #47 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2007, 05:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,262
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Anijsmelk? I can get the cubes here; let me know if you want some.


LOL TY! That's OK and very nice of you. My relatives in NL can send them
to me in less time. How do you come to know about anijsmelk? Do you get
'muisjes' as well?


There's a sizeable Dutch and Dutch-descended population in NZ (about 1%
of our population was born in the Netherlands or descended from a Dutch
person who immigrated, including two of my cousins), and some Dutch
specialties are available here as a result.

Yes we can get muisjes, speculaasjes, drop (I don't like the dubbel-zout
or salmiak) and other things as well. I grew up on beschuit!

Miche (who must admit that she doesn't care for anijsmelk)

--
Electricians do it in three phases
  #48 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-12-2007, 05:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Sat 29 Dec 2007 08:58:59p, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Sat 29 Dec 2007 08:30:18a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 08:43:33a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright

Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a
substitute for the other.

I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors

are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing
wouldn't be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright

True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never

an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of
people do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.


Yep, you're right, and I usually have all of those in the house.

There
have been a few times when I've run out of something and didn't know
it. Subbing was the only alternative. Now, if I were making
Springerle, I would definitely NOT substitute fennel seed for anise
seed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright

That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Ari, you have lived in many different places. I've always been curious
about where you were from originally.


LOL What and give away my secrets??? Oh OK....originally from
Maastricht, Limburg, the Netherlands. And no I can't stand Limburger
cheese. When my mother gets some I try to leave the house LOL.


Thanks, Ari. Oddly, for some reason I thought you might be from the
Netherlands. Don't really know why. Perhaps it was something you said at
some point that I had stored away in my head. OTOH, David and I both love
Limburger cheese, although we don't have it often. I just bought some, as
we always do have some on New Year's Eve, regardless what else we have. :-)



LOL then enjoy it and eat it good cheer!
  #49 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-12-2007, 05:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.

Anijsmelk? I can get the cubes here; let me know if you want some.


LOL TY! That's OK and very nice of you. My relatives in NL can send them
to me in less time. How do you come to know about anijsmelk? Do you get
'muisjes' as well?


There's a sizeable Dutch and Dutch-descended population in NZ (about 1%
of our population was born in the Netherlands or descended from a Dutch
person who immigrated, including two of my cousins), and some Dutch
specialties are available here as a result.


How very cool! Had no idea.


Yes we can get muisjes, speculaasjes, drop (I don't like the dubbel-zout
or salmiak) and other things as well. I grew up on beschuit!


Can get good beschuit here but not in the supermarket. Strangely enough
the large Asian supermarket carries that and the occasional pack of
stroopwafels, speculaas and hagelslag. No drop though; could
occasionally get the salmiak pastillen from the German butcher. Can get
a lot over the Net but delivery is prohibitive of course.

Miche (who must admit that she doesn't care for anijsmelk)


LOL hey it's good stuff but not every day! Will pester the relatives.
They didn't get me anything for my last birthday anyway LOL.

Do you like saucijzen brotjes?
  #50 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2008, 01:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,262
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:


There's a sizeable Dutch and Dutch-descended population in NZ (about 1%
of our population was born in the Netherlands or descended from a Dutch
person who immigrated, including two of my cousins), and some Dutch
specialties are available here as a result.


How very cool! Had no idea.


The gov't wanted immigrants after WWII so encouraged the Dutch to come
as they were the "right sort" *cough*white*cough*

Yes we can get muisjes, speculaasjes, drop (I don't like the dubbel-zout
or salmiak) and other things as well. I grew up on beschuit!


Can get good beschuit here but not in the supermarket. Strangely enough
the large Asian supermarket carries that and the occasional pack of
stroopwafels, speculaas and hagelslag. No drop though; could
occasionally get the salmiak pastillen from the German butcher. Can get
a lot over the Net but delivery is prohibitive of course.

Miche (who must admit that she doesn't care for anijsmelk)


LOL hey it's good stuff but not every day! Will pester the relatives.
They didn't get me anything for my last birthday anyway LOL.

Do you like saucijzen brotjes?


Don't think I've ever had 'em.

I did like my cousins' Oma's appelflappen, though. I ought to see if
Tante Betty has the recipe.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases


  #51 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2008, 04:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:


There's a sizeable Dutch and Dutch-descended population in NZ (about 1%
of our population was born in the Netherlands or descended from a Dutch
person who immigrated, including two of my cousins), and some Dutch
specialties are available here as a result.


How very cool! Had no idea.


The gov't wanted immigrants after WWII so encouraged the Dutch to come
as they were the "right sort" *cough*white*cough*


LOL! Isn't it always like that. Plus we are so very good at flood
control (since the 50s at any rate...) Turns out that my family had the
option of going to NZ or Oz, but apparently my father thought that was
too 'foreign' for him. Shame; could have had all that great lamb all
those years.

Yes we can get muisjes, speculaasjes, drop (I don't like the dubbel-zout
or salmiak) and other things as well. I grew up on beschuit!


Can get good beschuit here but not in the supermarket. Strangely enough
the large Asian supermarket carries that and the occasional pack of
stroopwafels, speculaas and hagelslag. No drop though; could
occasionally get the salmiak pastillen from the German butcher. Can get
a lot over the Net but delivery is prohibitive of course.

Miche (who must admit that she doesn't care for anijsmelk)


LOL hey it's good stuff but not every day! Will pester the relatives.
They didn't get me anything for my last birthday anyway LOL.

Do you like saucijzen brotjes?


Don't think I've ever had 'em.


Related to UK sausage rolls, but with better sausage and better pastry.
Of course with a wheat sensitivity won't do you much good.

I did like my cousins' Oma's appelflappen, though. I ought to see if
Tante Betty has the recipe.

Miche


If she doesn't, we should have one or two recipes.

--
Electricians do it in three phases

  #52 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2008, 08:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,262
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:


There's a sizeable Dutch and Dutch-descended population in NZ (about 1%
of our population was born in the Netherlands or descended from a Dutch
person who immigrated, including two of my cousins), and some Dutch
specialties are available here as a result.

How very cool! Had no idea.


The gov't wanted immigrants after WWII so encouraged the Dutch to come
as they were the "right sort" *cough*white*cough*


LOL! Isn't it always like that. Plus we are so very good at flood
control (since the 50s at any rate...) Turns out that my family had the
option of going to NZ or Oz, but apparently my father thought that was
too 'foreign' for him. Shame; could have had all that great lamb all
those years.


Dang! He should've come.

Do you like saucijzen brotjes?


Don't think I've ever had 'em.


Related to UK sausage rolls, but with better sausage and better pastry.
Of course with a wheat sensitivity won't do you much good.


Well not now but if I'd known about them when I was younger I'd probably
have liked them. My family wasn't big into "foreign muck" though, until
Dad started experimenting with Chinese food when I was a teenager.

I did like my cousins' Oma's appelflappen, though. I ought to see if
Tante Betty has the recipe.


If she doesn't, we should have one or two recipes.


Ooo!

They were a special treat, I only ate them on New Year's Day when Oma
and Opa and Tante Betty (Bettina) and the cousins came out to our big
family picnic.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
  #53 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-01-2008, 03:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:



The gov't wanted immigrants after WWII so encouraged the Dutch to come
as they were the "right sort" *cough*white*cough*


LOL! Isn't it always like that. Plus we are so very good at flood
control (since the 50s at any rate...) Turns out that my family had the
option of going to NZ or Oz, but apparently my father thought that was
too 'foreign' for him. Shame; could have had all that great lamb all
those years.


Dang! He should've come.


That's what I said after my mother 'confessed' last week LOL. He'd
already had to leave his homeland to move to the Netherlands. So what's
wrong with foreign after that


Do you like saucijzen brotjes?

Don't think I've ever had 'em.


Related to UK sausage rolls, but with better sausage and better pastry.
Of course with a wheat sensitivity won't do you much good.


Well not now but if I'd known about them when I was younger I'd probably
have liked them. My family wasn't big into "foreign muck" though, until
Dad started experimenting with Chinese food when I was a teenager.


Common enough in many cultures. So what do you make pastry with, if you
make pastry that is?

I did like my cousins' Oma's appelflappen, though. I ought to see if
Tante Betty has the recipe.


If she doesn't, we should have one or two recipes.


Ooo!

They were a special treat, I only ate them on New Year's Day when Oma
and Opa and Tante Betty (Bettina) and the cousins came out to our big
family picnic.

Miche


Can be eaten any time of the year. Really nice when the apples are
freshly harvested though.

Try this, but I have no idea what you can use instead of wheat flour.
Rice flour won't do it; BTDT and it wasn't pretty...

Appelflappen
(from 'Het Winter Koek Book') my translation

4 large apples
lemon juice
125 g flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
pinch of salt
2 dl milk
oil for frying/baking
icing/confectioner's sugar (or anything else you like on you pancakes)

Peel and core the apples. Slice about 1 cm thick. Sprinkle with lemon
juice to prevent discolouration.

Mix the flour, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Add the milk
gradually, stirring to form a smooth batter. Heat the oil in a suitable
frying pan. Add the sliced apples to the batter and fry/bake until the
pancakes are brown and done.

Eet smakelijk!
  #54 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-01-2008, 04:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,262
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:



The gov't wanted immigrants after WWII so encouraged the Dutch to come
as they were the "right sort" *cough*white*cough*

LOL! Isn't it always like that. Plus we are so very good at flood
control (since the 50s at any rate...) Turns out that my family had the
option of going to NZ or Oz, but apparently my father thought that was
too 'foreign' for him. Shame; could have had all that great lamb all
those years.


Dang! He should've come.


That's what I said after my mother 'confessed' last week LOL. He'd
already had to leave his homeland to move to the Netherlands. So what's
wrong with foreign after that


Well quite.

NZ in the '50s would have been quite different, though -- nobody here
knew how to make coffee.


Do you like saucijzen brotjes?

Don't think I've ever had 'em.

Related to UK sausage rolls, but with better sausage and better pastry.
Of course with a wheat sensitivity won't do you much good.


Well not now but if I'd known about them when I was younger I'd probably
have liked them. My family wasn't big into "foreign muck" though, until
Dad started experimenting with Chinese food when I was a teenager.


Common enough in many cultures. So what do you make pastry with, if you
make pastry that is?


Spelt flour, mostly. Behaves and tastes almost identical to wheat but
requires less moisture.

[Appelflappen]

They were a special treat, I only ate them on New Year's Day when Oma
and Opa and Tante Betty (Bettina) and the cousins came out to our big
family picnic.


Can be eaten any time of the year. Really nice when the apples are
freshly harvested though.

Try this, but I have no idea what you can use instead of wheat flour.
Rice flour won't do it; BTDT and it wasn't pretty...

Appelflappen
(from 'Het Winter Koek Book') my translation

4 large apples
lemon juice
125 g flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
pinch of salt
2 dl milk
oil for frying/baking
icing/confectioner's sugar (or anything else you like on you pancakes)

Peel and core the apples. Slice about 1 cm thick. Sprinkle with lemon
juice to prevent discolouration.

Mix the flour, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Add the milk
gradually, stirring to form a smooth batter. Heat the oil in a suitable
frying pan. Add the sliced apples to the batter and fry/bake until the
pancakes are brown and done.

Eet smakelijk!


Oooh fabulous. Thank you!

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
  #55 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2008, 03:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

snip

That's what I said after my mother 'confessed' last week LOL. He'd
already had to leave his homeland to move to the Netherlands. So what's
wrong with foreign after that


Well quite.


LOL. The man had lived in practically every country in Western Europe in
any case.

NZ in the '50s would have been quite different, though -- nobody here
knew how to make coffee.


This would have been after that but the coffee certainly would have been
an issue in our family!

The Dutch (and most other Europeans except the UKers) prefer the coffee
to be strong! Did you ever get into using koffiemelk?


snip

Common enough in many cultures. So what do you make pastry with, if you
make pastry that is?


Spelt flour, mostly. Behaves and tastes almost identical to wheat but
requires less moisture.


Will get some and see how it works. Don't think it's that expensive
around here.


[Appelflappen]

They were a special treat, I only ate them on New Year's Day when Oma
and Opa and Tante Betty (Bettina) and the cousins came out to our big
family picnic.


Can be eaten any time of the year. Really nice when the apples are
freshly harvested though.

Try this, but I have no idea what you can use instead of wheat flour.
Rice flour won't do it; BTDT and it wasn't pretty...

Appelflappen


snip recipe
Eet smakelijk!


Oooh fabulous. Thank you!

Miche



My pleasure as always. My collection of Dutch cookbooks is mostly about
traditional/regional recipes. Sorry I didn't buy more last time I was
there. Any time you want a recipe just give a shout.


  #56 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-01-2008, 08:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,262
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Miche wrote:

snip

That's what I said after my mother 'confessed' last week LOL. He'd
already had to leave his homeland to move to the Netherlands. So what's
wrong with foreign after that


Well quite.


LOL. The man had lived in practically every country in Western Europe in
any case.

NZ in the '50s would have been quite different, though -- nobody here
knew how to make coffee.


This would have been after that but the coffee certainly would have been
an issue in our family!


If coffee was drunk at all in NZ at the time (most people drank tea;
coffee was seen as "a bit swanky" and associated with Americans), it was
instant. And weak.

The Dutch (and most other Europeans except the UKers) prefer the coffee
to be strong! Did you ever get into using koffiemelk?


No, never. I'll give it a go when I see some, though.


snip

Common enough in many cultures. So what do you make pastry with, if you
make pastry that is?


Spelt flour, mostly. Behaves and tastes almost identical to wheat but
requires less moisture.


Will get some and see how it works. Don't think it's that expensive
around here.


[Appelflappen]
Try this, but I have no idea what you can use instead of wheat flour.
Rice flour won't do it; BTDT and it wasn't pretty...


I'll use spelt; I'm sure it will work fine.

Appelflappen


snip recipe
Eet smakelijk!


Oooh fabulous. Thank you!

Miche



My pleasure as always. My collection of Dutch cookbooks is mostly about
traditional/regional recipes. Sorry I didn't buy more last time I was
there. Any time you want a recipe just give a shout.


Shall do. Thank you!

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chocolate & nutmeg??? Sky General Cooking 1 25-12-2010 01:41 AM
Nutmeg recall Virginia Tadrzynski[_2_] General Cooking 9 03-12-2010 02:25 AM
Mace PENMART01 General Cooking 1 14-10-2004 07:36 PM
Whole Mace or Ground Mace?? Help! Matthew Givens General Cooking 12 27-09-2004 08:09 PM
nutmeg? Kevin and Katie General Cooking 3 30-09-2003 07:22 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:10 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017