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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-12-2007, 08:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Thu 27 Dec 2007 10:43:10a, Janet Baraclough told us...

The message
from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.


It's not the blossom. Mace is a lacy layer covering the nutmeg , both
are contained within an outer layer.

see a pic of how they fit together at

http://www.picturescolourlibrary.co....go/2166366.jpg

Janet


Yes, I knew that, but apparently Michael did not. I use blades of mace
with certain pickles that I make. A couple of times I have bought the
nutmeg with the mace still surrounding it.

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Thursday, 12(XII)/27(XXVII)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
4dys 10hrs 35mins
*******************************************
Another great idea from the man who
brought you Beer Milkshake
*******************************************


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Old 27-12-2007, 09:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace


"Janet Baraclough" wrote

from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.


It's not the blossom. Mace is a lacy layer covering the nutmeg , both
are contained within an outer layer.


I was wondering how that could be called a blossom. Not being
a biologist, I figured maybe it's technically a blossom, somehow.

Unrelated, I watched an episode of a show a couple of weeks ago.
Thought of it with this mace/blossom business. Without going into
details, the story was these people were super-sniffers and they
were sniffing some jerk chicken and decifering what was in it. The
mother ended with Ground nutmeg, not minced! I know it's for laughs,
but I thought ... minced nutmeg? Good luck with that!

nancy



  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-12-2007, 11:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
3.184...
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 10:43:10a, Janet Baraclough told us...

The message
from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.


It's not the blossom. Mace is a lacy layer covering the nutmeg , both
are contained within an outer layer.

see a pic of how they fit together at

http://www.picturescolourlibrary.co....go/2166366.jpg

Janet


Yes, I knew that, but apparently Michael did not. I use blades of mace
with certain pickles that I make. A couple of times I have bought the
nutmeg with the mace still surrounding it.

Since I don't know the English name of the thingy covering the seed
(the Arillus), I just called it blossom.
What's the English word for Arillus ?

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner




  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-12-2007, 11:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

Michael Kuettner wrote:


Since I don't know the English name of the thingy covering the seed
(the Arillus), I just called it blossom.
What's the English word for Arillus ?



I think it's the aril.

gloria p
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2007, 12:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Thu 27 Dec 2007 04:03:41p, Michael Kuettner told us...


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
3.184...
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 10:43:10a, Janet Baraclough told us...

The message
from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.

It's not the blossom. Mace is a lacy layer covering the nutmeg ,

both
are contained within an outer layer.

see a pic of how they fit together at

http://www.picturescolourlibrary.co....go/2166366.jpg

Janet


Yes, I knew that, but apparently Michael did not. I use blades of mace
with certain pickles that I make. A couple of times I have bought the
nutmeg with the mace still surrounding it.

Since I don't know the English name of the thingy covering the seed
(the Arillus), I just called it blossom.
What's the English word for Arillus ?

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner





Michael, I was forgetting that English is not your native language. I
apologize. I don't think there is really one English word that is the
equivalent. Here is a definitiona;

n.) A exterior covering, forming a false coat or appendage to a seed, as
the loose, transparent bag inclosing the seed or the white water lily. The
mace of the nutmeg is also an aril.

Arillus: words in the definition
A, Also, An, Appendage, Aril, As, Bag, Coat, Covering, Exterior, False,
Forming, Inclosing, Is, Lily, Loose, Mace, Nutmeg, Of, Or, Seed, The, To,
Transparent, Water, White,


--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Thursday, 12(XII)/27(XXVII)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
4dys 6hrs 35mins
*******************************************
I xeroxed a mirror, now I have an
extra copier.
*******************************************



  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2007, 03:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright


Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a substitute
for the other.


I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing wouldn't
be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright


True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of people
do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2007, 05:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb :
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 04:03:41p, Michael Kuettner told us...


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb :
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 10:43:10a, Janet Baraclough told us...

The message from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.

It's not the blossom. Mace is a lacy layer covering the nutmeg ,

both
are contained within an outer layer.

see a pic of how they fit together at

http://www.picturescolourlibrary.co....go/2166366.jpg

Janet


Yes, I knew that, but apparently Michael did not. I use blades of mace
with certain pickles that I make. A couple of times I have bought the
nutmeg with the mace still surrounding it.

Since I don't know the English name of the thingy covering the seed
(the Arillus), I just called it blossom.
What's the English word for Arillus ?


Michael, I was forgetting that English is not your native language. I
apologize.


No worries. Aril or arillus isn't a word in everyday use.
And since my big dic is 400 km away ...

I don't think there is really one English word that is the
equivalent. Here is a definitiona;

n.) A exterior covering, forming a false coat or appendage to a seed, as
the loose, transparent bag inclosing the seed or the white water lily. The
mace of the nutmeg is also an aril.

Arillus: words in the definition
A, Also, An, Appendage, Aril, As, Bag, Coat, Covering, Exterior, False,
Forming, Inclosing, Is, Lily, Loose, Mace, Nutmeg, Of, Or, Seed, The, To,
Transparent, Water, White,

Arillus: words in the definition
An appendage forming a false coat to bag Aril's exterior, inclosing Lily's
seed. Loose mace as nutmeg to the transparent white water.

I've post-modernized your poem for you ;-)

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner

PS : Thanks also to Gloria and Janet !




  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2007, 07:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 08:43:33a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright

Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a substitute
for the other.


I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing

wouldn't
be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright


True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of people
do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.


Yep, you're right, and I usually have all of those in the house. There
have been a few times when I've run out of something and didn't know it.
Subbing was the only alternative. Now, if I were making Springerle, I
would definitely NOT substitute fennel seed for anise seed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Friday, 12(XII)/28(XXVIII)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
3dys 11hrs 25mins
*******************************************
I've been on a diet for two weeks and
all I've lost is two weeks. --Totie Fields
*******************************************

  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2007, 07:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 10:41:59a, Michael Kuettner told us...


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb :
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 04:03:41p, Michael Kuettner told us...


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb :
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 10:43:10a, Janet Baraclough told us...

The message from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:

Nutmeg is the nut; mace is the blossom.

It's not the blossom. Mace is a lacy layer covering the nutmeg ,
both
are contained within an outer layer.

see a pic of how they fit together at

http://www.picturescolourlibrary.co....go/2166366.jpg

Janet


Yes, I knew that, but apparently Michael did not. I use blades of

mace
with certain pickles that I make. A couple of times I have bought the
nutmeg with the mace still surrounding it.

Since I don't know the English name of the thingy covering the seed
(the Arillus), I just called it blossom.
What's the English word for Arillus ?


Michael, I was forgetting that English is not your native language. I
apologize.


No worries. Aril or arillus isn't a word in everyday use.
And since my big dic is 400 km away ...

I don't think there is really one English word that is the
equivalent. Here is a definitiona;

n.) A exterior covering, forming a false coat or appendage to a seed, as
the loose, transparent bag inclosing the seed or the white water lily.

The
mace of the nutmeg is also an aril.

Arillus: words in the definition
A, Also, An, Appendage, Aril, As, Bag, Coat, Covering, Exterior, False,
Forming, Inclosing, Is, Lily, Loose, Mace, Nutmeg, Of, Or, Seed, The,

To,
Transparent, Water, White,

Arillus: words in the definition
An appendage forming a false coat to bag Aril's exterior, inclosing

Lily's
seed. Loose mace as nutmeg to the transparent white water.

I've post-modernized your poem for you ;-)


I like that!

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner

PS : Thanks also to Gloria and Janet !








--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Friday, 12(XII)/28(XXVIII)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
3dys 11hrs 20mins
*******************************************
Del Mar: Where poverty is neither a
philosophy nor a way of life.
*******************************************

  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2007, 04:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 12:13:05p, Janet Baraclough told us...

The message
from "Michael Kuettner" contains these words:


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb :
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 04:03:41p, Michael Kuettner told us...


"Wayne Boatwright" schrieb :
On Thu 27 Dec 2007 10:43:10a, Janet Baraclough told us...


Michael, I was forgetting that English is not your native language. I
apologize.


No worries. Aril or arillus isn't a word in everyday use.
And since my big dic is 400 km away ...


Ohmigod. I do hope not....

Janet.


Now that *would* cause separation anxiety of another thread. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Friday, 12(XII)/28(XXVIII)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
3dys 2hrs 50mins
*******************************************
Life's Law: NOTHING ever happens
until it does.
*******************************************



  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2007, 03:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 08:43:33a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright

Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a substitute
for the other.

I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing

wouldn't
be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright


True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of people
do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.


Yep, you're right, and I usually have all of those in the house. There
have been a few times when I've run out of something and didn't know it.
Subbing was the only alternative. Now, if I were making Springerle, I
would definitely NOT substitute fennel seed for anise seed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright


That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.
  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2007, 05:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

On Sat 29 Dec 2007 08:30:18a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 08:43:33a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright

Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a
substitute for the other.

I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing
wouldn't be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright

True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of
people do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.


Yep, you're right, and I usually have all of those in the house. There
have been a few times when I've run out of something and didn't know
it. Subbing was the only alternative. Now, if I were making
Springerle, I would definitely NOT substitute fennel seed for anise
seed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright


That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Ari, you have lived in many different places. I've always been curious
about where you were from originally.

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Saturday, 12(XII)/29(XXIX)/07(MMVII)
Countdown till New Years
2dys 13hrs 30mins
*******************************************
Polls show that 9 out of 6
schizophrenics agree.
*******************************************

  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2007, 09:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace

In article , Arri London
wrote:

That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Anijsmelk? I can get the cubes here; let me know if you want some.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2007, 03:57 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Miche wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Anijsmelk? I can get the cubes here; let me know if you want some.

Miche


LOL TY! That's OK and very nice of you. My relatives in NL can send them
to me in less time. How do you come to know about anijsmelk? Do you get
'muisjes' as well?
  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2007, 03:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,178
Default Nutmeg vs. Mace



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Sat 29 Dec 2007 08:30:18a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Fri 28 Dec 2007 08:43:33a, Arri London told us...



Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 26 Dec 2007 06:40:06p, Arri London told us...


Wayne Boatwright

Two completely different flavours for me. One wouldn't be a
substitute for the other.

I think it depends on what the use is. I agree that the flavors are
different, but also think there's enough similarity that subbing
wouldn't be a disaster in some dishes.

--
Wayne Boatwright

True enough. We always have both in the house so subbing is never an
issue. Rather like subbing anise seeds for fennel seeds; lots of
people do that but the two tastes are totally different to me.


Yep, you're right, and I usually have all of those in the house. There
have been a few times when I've run out of something and didn't know
it. Subbing was the only alternative. Now, if I were making
Springerle, I would definitely NOT substitute fennel seed for anise
seed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright


That would be heresy indeed! *sigh* I miss the anise-flavoured cubes
used in the Netherlands to put into hot milk. The seeds work but the
taste just isn't quite the same.


Ari, you have lived in many different places. I've always been curious
about where you were from originally.


LOL What and give away my secrets??? Oh OK....originally from
Maastricht, Limburg, the Netherlands. And no I can't stand Limburger
cheese. When my mother gets some I try to leave the house LOL.


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