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Old 13-12-2007, 07:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.
-ginny



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Old 13-12-2007, 07:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.
-ginny


Googled "crescent rolls stollen" and there were lots of hits like this:.

http://www.everyrecipe.info/holidays...en_240146.html
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Old 13-12-2007, 09:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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One time on Usenet, "Virginia Tadrzynski" said:

I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.


Looks like you got an answer from a couple of folks, so I'll ask
this -- have you tried it yourself and is it any good? I like
Crescent rolls, but have never tried them in a sweet recipe.

I had a friend in high school who's mom made homemade stollen
stuffed with fruit and cream cheese. She made a couple of them
for a slumber party at their house. Lovely lady, great cook...

--
Jani in WA
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Old 13-12-2007, 09:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Dec 13, 3:35 pm, (Little Malice) wrote:
One time on Usenet, "Virginia Tadrzynski" said:

I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.


Looks like you got an answer from a couple of folks, so I'll ask
this -- have you tried it yourself and is it any good? I like
Crescent rolls, but have never tried them in a sweet recipe.


It is disgusting. The Pillsbury crescents are full of hydrogenated
shortening, and no well informed persons who give a shit about their
families' health would buy them in this day and age.

--
Jani in WA


--Bryan
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Old 13-12-2007, 10:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Little Malice wrote:
One time on Usenet, "Virginia Tadrzynski" said:

I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.


Looks like you got an answer from a couple of folks, so I'll ask
this -- have you tried it yourself and is it any good? I like
Crescent rolls, but have never tried them in a sweet recipe.

I had a friend in high school who's mom made homemade stollen
stuffed with fruit and cream cheese. She made a couple of them
for a slumber party at their house. Lovely lady, great cook...


I have never ever made stollen with cream cheese filling. My stollen
recipes have no filling at all, only the dried fruits dispersed
throughout and powdered sugar sprinkled *liberally* on top. I'd use
traditional sweet yeast dough recipes before even considering one made
with prepackaged crescent rolls, but who knows. I could be missing
something!



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Old 13-12-2007, 10:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.
-ginny


Never heard of Stollen with a filling. Here is my version. I have been
making them each year since the mid 1970s.

A stand mixer is useful for this recipe because the dough is very heavy
and sticky. Also, it takes a long time to rise so be patient and
allocate most of a day for making it.

Don

Stollen

From The New York Times International Cook Book by Craig Claiborne


1 cup milk -- scalded
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter
3 tablespoons shortening
3 packages yeast
3 eggs -- lightly beaten
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon mace
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
3 cups bread flour
3 cups all purpose flour (about 3 cups)
1 1/2 cups candied fruit
1/2 cup raisins
3/4 cup chopped pecans

For frosting:
1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter -- melted
Water

Combine milk, sugar, salt, butter, and shortening. Stir to dissolve
sugar. Cool or heat to about 120°.

Proof yeast in a bit of water and a pinch of sugar.

Toss fruits with a bit of flour.

Combine bread flour, cinnamon, mace, and cardamom. Mix in eggs, proofed
yeast, and milk mixture.

Add enough all purpose flour to make a kneadable dough. Knead until
elastic, adding more flour as needed. Dough will be sticky. Knead in
the fruits and nuts.

Spray a bowl with Pam. Place dough in bowl and spray top of dough with
Pam. Cover with a towel and let raise until doubles, about 2 hours.

Punch down, divide in two and roll each half into a 12" x 9" rectangle.
Fold dough about 2/3 along the long axis. Place on greased cookie
sheets. Cover each stollen with a towel and let raise until doubled,
about 45 - 60 min.

Bake in a preheated 350° oven for about 30 min., until stollen sound
hollow when rapped on the bottom. Cool on racks.

Frosting: Combine powdered sugar, butter, and water to make a very thick
slurry. Drizzle frosting over cooled stollen and decorate with pecan
halves and candied fruit if desired.
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Old 13-12-2007, 10:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Don Kleist" wrote in message
...

Never heard of Stollen with a filling. Here is my version. I have been
making them each year since the mid 1970s.


I've never made stollen, but your recipe sounds very good.

As to fillings in stollen, some traditional German ones have a marzipan
filling. Absolutely my favorite -- store-bought stollen is often fairly
dry, but the marzipan filling keeps it moist in addition to adding all that
almond goodness.

Anny'


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Old 13-12-2007, 10:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Don Kleist wrote:

Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry. Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.
-ginny


Never heard of Stollen with a filling. Here is my version. I have been
making them each year since the mid 1970s.


A local German deli sells a Stollen with a marzipan filling.


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Old 13-12-2007, 11:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Bobo Bonobo(R) wrote:


It is disgusting. The Pillsbury crescents are full of hydrogenated
shortening, and no well informed persons who give a shit about their
families' health would buy them in this day and age.


Impressive. You went a lot longer this time before I killfiled you.




Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
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Old 13-12-2007, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Gregory Morrow" wrote in message
...


I noticed that the article called it a Christmas cake.

Do all consider it a Christmas cake -- or bread?

Dee Dee




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Old 13-12-2007, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Dave Smith wrote:

Don Kleist wrote:

Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
I have been requested to duplicate a recipe for Christmas Eve. It is
stollen using Pillsbury Crescent rolls and if I remember correctly it

has a
cream cheese filling. I searched Pillsbury's website and came up dry.

Any
ideas? The lady who originally made it has passed away and the

daughter
boils water nicely, so forget asking her for her mom's recipe.
-ginny


Never heard of Stollen with a filling. Here is my version. I have been
making them each year since the mid 1970s.


A local German deli sells a Stollen with a marzipan filling.



Is it only *real* stollen if it's baked in Dresden...??? Viz:


http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article3247571.ece


Battle of the bakeries as rival cities lay claim to stollen recipe

By Tony Paterson in Berlin

Published: 13 December 2007

"The threat of a vicious and protracted "stollen" war is looming over
Germany after one of the country's leading chefs claimed the eastern city of
Dresden had spent more than 500 years pretending to be the inventor of the
famous "Dresdner stollen" Christmas cake.

The loaf-shaped confection, usually containing almonds, raisins, marzipan
and lemon peel and coated with powdered sugar, is a must for most German
families over the festive season. It is supposed to represent the baby Jesus
wrapped in swaddling clothes.

For more than 530 years, Dresden has claimed to have invented the cake,
which it subsequently bestowed with the title "Dresdner Christstollen", or
Christmas cake. The delicacy survived both world wars and Communism and is
now exported around the globe from Dresden bakeries where it is produced.

Last weekend, thousands of tourists flocked to Dresden to watch the world's
biggest stollen, some 4.35 metres long, being pulled through the streets in
a procession to the city's market. There, it was ritually cut into 7,000
slices with a 17th-century stollen knife the size of a machete.

But an unwelcome element of doubt has clouded the city's traditional
pre-Christmas stollen festivities. Reinhard Lämmel, a leading east German
chef and author of the recently published Saxony Cookbook, insists that the
Dresdner stollen was not invented in Dresden at all - but in the nearby town
of Torgau.

He claims there is firm historical evidence that a court baker called
Heinrich Drasdow made a stollen at Hartenstein Castle near Torgau by in
1457 - 17 years before the cake was ever mentioned in connection with
Dresden. "The Dresdners did not invent the stollen, they merely refined it,"
Mr Lämmel said.

In a further insult to Dresden, the chef claims that the Saxon dialect
spoken by the city's inhabitants mumbles High German to such an extent that
the original name for the cake - Drasdower Stollen - became corrupted into
Dresdner Stollen. "Drasdow became Dresden over time and the stollen's
original baker was forgotten," added Mr Lämmel, whose findings have been
backed by historians.

Drasdow was the first to add butter, sugar and raisins to the stollen and
his recipe revolutionised the insipid Christmas cakes of the 15th century,
which suffered because of a papal ban on the use of butter during Advent.

Predictably, the challenge to the Dresdner stollen's supremacy has been
dismissed by the city's bakers. Wolfgang Hesse, the chairman of the
venerable Dresden Stollen Protection Association, said: "The real Christmas
stollen comes only from Dresden. It does not matter who baked what 500 years
ago."

Marlon Gauk, who each year exports 80 per cent of the 7,000 stollens he
produces, added: "Dresden is the place that refined the stollen and made it
world famous. It sells very well, so I am not surprised that others are
trying to get in on the act."

Such remarks have only encouraged Torgau - whose only other big claim to
fame is that it was the meeting point for the advancing Russian and US
armies at the end of the Second World War - to step up its claim to be the
inventor of the cake.

Anja Jerichen, the town's tourism director, said the story of Heinrich
Drasdow would in future be a prominent feature of its guided tours. "We are
going to start marketing our stollen tradition properly," she said."

/



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Old 13-12-2007, 11:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Dec 13, 5:08 pm, "Default User" wrote:
Bobo Bonobo(R) wrote:
It is disgusting. The Pillsbury crescents are full of hydrogenated
shortening, and no well informed persons who give a shit about their
families' health would buy them in this day and age.


Impressive. You went a lot longer this time before I killfiled you.


I hope you die of coronary artery disease

Brian


--Bryan
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Dee.Dee wrote:

"Gregory Morrow" wrote in

message
...


I noticed that the article called it a Christmas cake.

Do all consider it a Christmas cake -- or bread?



I consider it a cake, but then I'm not an "appellation expert", in German
it's considered a "brot" or bread...

:-)

BTW Aldi and World Market here in the states make passable store - bought
stollen, these are German but not from Dresden IIRC. There are also still a
number of old - time German bakeries here in Chicago that make very good
stollen...Zingerman's in Ann Arbor MI also supposedly makes a good one.

I've seen this place mentioned as one of the better sources in the US to buy
stollen, notice they call it a "bread" - I see that they are sold out and
taking orders for 2008:

http://dresdenstollen.com/

"In Dresden, Germany, friends and associates have long exchanged stollen, a
delicious sweet bread, to celebrate the holidays. When Irmgard Maron came to
the United States in 1938, she carried a traditional Dresden Stollen recipe
and began baking it for friends and relatives.

Sixty-nine years later, Dresden Stollen Bakers continues as a
third-generation family business dedicated to baking this deliciously rich
German bread to celebrate the holiday season. We hope you'll enjoy it this
year and share it with your family, friends, and business associates!

The Maron family was long established in Dresden, Germany prior to World War
II. As a result of the family's Jewish ancestry, the Maron family scattered
around the world before the war. Irmgard and her brother Hans Georg both
made their way to the United States, where they settled and raised families.
Irmgard began baking stollen, and, after 50 years, passed the family baking
tradition on to descendents of her brother.

Dresden Stollen is said to have originated in 1329 as a result of a contest
offered by the Bishop of Nauruburg. Bakers in the region produced a
wonderful bread baked with the finest butter, sugar, raisins, citron and
other specialty ingredients. The Bishop enjoyed the stollen so much that he
ordered a quantity of grain saved for stollen only.

Stollen at that time were baked in loaves weighing 30 pounds. Stollen became
such a part of Dresdeners' lives that it was cut and served with special,
stollen only utensils. It was also tradition that the first piece of stollen
was set aside and kept to ensure the family would be able to afford a
stollen the following year and the last piece saved to ensure the family had
enough food for the year.

While traditions change over time, the joy of eating Dresden Stollen has yet
to waiver. For more information on Dresden Stollen, visit the official
German Dresden Stollen website:

http://www.dresdnerstollen.com/english/e_index.htm

"Dresden Stollen ® - a masterpiece of baking - treasured around the world

The tradition of baking Dresden Stollen ® is a very old one and can be
traced back to around 1400 A.D. Originally baked without butter and milk,
the stollen (striezel) was a rather dull pastry. Elector Lord Ernst of
Saxony and his brother Albrecht appealed to the Pope to rescind the
so-called "butter ban" in effect at the time. The Holy Father eventually
gave in to their entreaties and declared (in what came to be known as the
"Bufferbrief") that milk and butter could indeed be used in baking the
stollen - this could be done with a "clear conscience and with God's
blessing", after making the "appropriate penance" "Butterbrief".

Around 1500, "Christbrote uff Weihnachten" were being sold at the Dresden
"Striezelmarkt", the oldest existing German Christmas market. From 1560
onwards, Stollen-bakers delivered one or two Christmas stollen with a total
weight of 36 pounds to the king of Saxony for the holy celebration. Eight
master bakers and eight apprentices carried it to the castle. In 1730
"August the Strong", Elector Lord of Saxony, commanded the Bakery Guild of
Dresden to make a giant stollen with a weight of 1.8 tons! To commemorate
that event, a similar stollen is baked every year on the Saturday before the
second Advent at the annual Dresden Stollen Festival.

The Dresden Christmas Stollen ® has been produced in its present superb
form since the beginning of the 20th century. Only high quality, very fine
ingredients (Zutaten) as well as natural flavours and exotic spices are
used. While a basic stollen recipe (Grundrezept) exists, every stollen
bakery (some 150 exist) uses its own secret family recipe handed down over
generations. For years, stollen-eating experts have orderd their stollen at
their favourite traditional Dresden bakery.

Dresden Stollen ® are exclusively produced by hand, using the original old
recipe, at the shops of some 150 special bakeries.

Here are some tips for you to enjoy your stollen to the maximum at
Christmastime.

Traditional stollen weight:

Traditionally, each Dresden Stollen ® has a weight of 2 kilograms. At this
size, ingredient blend and flavour are maximized. However, popularity of the
1,5-kilogram-stollen is on the increase. Dresden Stollen ® are also
available in 1 kilogram and 750 gram sizes.

To prevent drying up of the Dresden Stollen ® , ideally it should be wrapped
it in linen cloth and stored in a wooden box in a cool, dark place. However,
the Stollen may be stored in its original packing on a balcony or in a
closet. The ideal storage temperature is between 3°C and 10°C (37°F-50°F) at
about 70% air humidity. Avoid excessive warmth and frost. Do not
refrigerate.

The Dresden Stollen ® should not be cut immediately upon purchase. Buy the
stollen 2-4 weeks before Christmas, or before the first time you intend to
eat some of it. Cut the Dresden Stollen from its centre outwards to its
ends. Cut off only as much as you intended to eat at a given time. You can
prevent the stollen from drying up by keeping the remaining two halves
"pushed together" at the centre.

An original Stollen Knife is best for cutting the stollen (but any sharp
knife will do). The Dresden Stollen ® is a sweet pastry, so enjoy it with a
cup of coffee for a very satisfying taste experience.

There are 150 bakeries in Dresden and environs that are authorised to sell
Dresden Stollen with the offical seal of the Trademark Protection
Association "Dresdner Stollen".

Schutzverband Dresdner Stollen e.V.
Hohe Str. 22
D-01069 Dresden
Germany

Fon: +49 351 4715353
Fax: +49 351 4710100

Email
"

/








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Gregory Morrow wrote:

http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article3247571.ece


Battle of the bakeries as rival cities lay claim to stollen recipe

By Tony Paterson in Berlin

Published: 13 December 2007

"The threat of a vicious and protracted "stollen" war is looming over
Germany after one of the country's leading chefs claimed the eastern city of
Dresden had spent more than 500 years pretending to be the inventor of the
famous "Dresdner stollen" Christmas cake.



Oh dear. Someone stoll the stollen thus making it stolen?


--Lia

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Old 14-12-2007, 12:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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One time on Usenet, "Default User" said:
Bobo Bonobo(R) wrote:


It is disgusting. The Pillsbury crescents are full of hydrogenated
shortening, and no well informed persons who give a shit about their
families' health would buy them in this day and age.


Impressive. You went a lot longer this time before I killfiled you.


You're patient, Brian. I killfiled him quite a while ago, during the
mayonnaise rants...

--
Jani in WA


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