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Old 29-11-2007, 08:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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If anyone know this recipe please reply to

Thank you!

Shaunna

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Old 29-11-2007, 03:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"l, not -l" wrote in message
...

On 29-Nov-2007, papageno wrote:

If anyone know this recipe please reply to

Thank you!

Shaunna


From the back of a Quaker Oats cookie jar I bought in the late 70s or
early
80s
* Exported from MasterCook *

Famous Oatmeal Cookies

Recipe By ee Bell
Serving Size : 30 Preparation Time :0:20
Categories : Cookie Dessert

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3/4 cup shortening -- soft
1 cup brown sugar -- firmly-packed
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 whole egg
1/4 cup water
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup all-purpose flour -- sifted
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3 cups oats -- uncooked

Beat shortening, sugars, egg, water and vanilla together until creamy.
Sift
together flour, salt and soda; add to creamed mixture; blend well. Stir
in
oats. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto greased cookie sheets. Bake in preheated
moderate oven (350F) 12 to 15 minutes.


Description:
"The classic oatmeal cookie from Quaker Oats box circa 1975-80"
Cuisine:
"American"
Yield:
"5 Dozen"
T(Baking Time):
"0:12"
Ratings : Complexity 1 Cost 2
Difficulty 1 Fat Content 4
Kid Appeal 10 Portability 10
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 155 Calories; 6g Fat (36.7%
calories
from fat); 3g Protein; 22g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 7mg
Cholesterol;
97mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other
Carbohydrates.

NOTES : For variety, add chopped nutmeats, raisins, chocolate chips or
coconut.

Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


--
Change Cujo to Juno in email address.


like minds and all that hoohaw. The same recipe I just posted. My cookbook
is a compilation of all the 'back of the box' recipes.
-ginny


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Old 29-11-2007, 03:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:

Taken from the Favorite Brand Name Cookbook (publ. 1981)



I have that cookbook and love it!


A story about the popularity of these cookies.


I often get into the mood to bake as the weather gets colder, but Jim
and I eat the baked goodies on the first day, then let them get stale
after that. I've tried to get better about freezing immediately, but
then we don't eat what I've frozen. So last year when I took a writing
class, in addition to its being a great class where I liked my
classmates and I learned tons, I had an outlet for my baking. I brought
goodies practically every week.


First I brought linzer torte and wrote about my fears that I'd made
torte-eous soup here. They were delighted. Then I gave them a banana
cake with a fancy cream cheese frosting. They complimented that and ate
it up. And so it went until the last class when I brought oatmeal
cookies. In addition to the thanks and compliments that were going to
my head, suddenly everyone wanted the recipe.
"But they're just the ordinary easy cookies from the lid of the box."
"Oh, but they're the best we've ever tasted, the best we've had, the
recipe, please.


So I gave them the recipe.


--Lia



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Old 29-11-2007, 05:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julia Altshuler schrieb

snip

First I brought linzer torte and wrote about my fears that I'd made torte-eous
soup here. They were delighted.


Could you please post your recipe for Linzertorte ?

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


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Old 29-11-2007, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Michael Kuettner wrote:

Could you please post your recipe for Linzertorte ?



I've been working on it for a while and don't yet have one recipe that I
make all the time and am satisfied with the results. I'm glad to share
what I know.


I started with the recipe in Silver Palate.
If you add more flour, the dough is easier to work with.
If you add too much flour, you lose the delicate flavor of the almonds.
If you don't add enough flour, you end up with the linzer torte soup
that I mentioned last post.
If it looks like you're getting soup, turn down the oven temp and keep
praying. Mine lost the lovely lattice top, but it did firm up enough to
serve and wow my classmates.
Despite everyone else's opinion, raspberry seeds do not improve jam.
You need a good tasting jam to make good linzer torte.
Cassis jam is traditional in Germany. Raspberry jam is traditional in
the U.S. I've been going wild with strawberry jam, apricot jam, and
blackberry jam. You can't go wrong as long as you start with good
tasting jam.
It is nearly impossible to guess in advance how much jam you'll need to
cover how much dough. Have extra, and be prepared not to use all of it.
I like a strong almond flavor. I added almond extract.
I also added more spice, especially cloves and nutmeg.
Much as I love orange and lemon zest in baked goods, and while they're
traditional, their flavors didn't come through in linzer torte.


And that's it. I don't have a recipe. I have a bunch of notes
scribbled in cookbooks.


--Lia

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Old 29-11-2007, 09:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julia Altshuler schrieb :
Michael Kuettner wrote:

Could you please post your recipe for Linzertorte ?



I've been working on it for a while and don't yet have one recipe that I make
all the time and am satisfied with the results. I'm glad to share what I
know.


I started with the recipe in Silver Palate.


Could you post that, please ?
I'd be interested how a Linzertorte can become a soup.

snip
I see your problem.

If you'd like the original recipe, I'll gladly translate and post
it.
The jam used is indeed cassis (Ribisel).

Servus,

Michael Kuettner








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Old 29-11-2007, 10:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Packrat that I am, I save my sent mail. Remembering that I brought
linzer torte to the writing class, I had an idea of what date to look
for the linzer torte thread on this group. The following is my note
from 10/25/06 and another from later that day. Google to see others'
posts on the "linzer torte soup" thread. I originally recalled using
the recipe in Silver Palate. I was wrong. That first time I used the
recipe in Joy of Cooking. I don't care to retype it here. It should be
easy enough to find.


----------------------------------


I wanted to make linzer torte for 2 reasons: I wanted a vehicle for the
cassis jam that I've fallen in love with (more than just putting it on
buttered toast), and I wanted to expand my repertoire of recipes that I
make. I tend to make the same things all the time without improving my
skills or the variety of things we eat around here.


I used the recipe for linzer torte in Joy of Cooking (page 686 in my
edition). I doubled it. I left out the cocoa and halved the amount of
spice. When I was done mixing the dough, it looked so awfully buttery
that I couldn't imagine rolling it out even after it had been chilled. I
added a bit more flour but didn't want to screw with the recipe too much
so I added only a little and refrigerated it when it still was sticky
and buttery. I remember from the Culinary Institute (20 years ago for
me) that we all had trouble rolling out linzer torte dough. It got so
sticky.


I refrigerated the dough overnight and pressed it into a brownie pan as
per the directions (6" x 9"). Then I put on the jam, made a lattice and
put in more jam. The dough was sticky and hard to work with, but I
expected that.


With the left over dough, I made thumb print cookies. They're now out
of the oven. I'd say they were too sweet but not bad. I could serve
them. The larger pan is still in the 325 degree oven (11:45a EST). It
looks like I'm making linzer torte soup, one of those delicious
disasters that could go over ice cream but never firms up enough to be
served in the way it was meant to be eaten. The edges are browning
nicely. The middle looks soggy.


Questions:


Is there anything I can do at this point to avert disaster? Adjust the
temperature or do something with tin foil?


In the future, do I add more flour to the dough until it looks right to
me? Or is there a better recipe to use? There are tons on the web, but
I thought I'd go with Joy of Cooking for this first time.


-----------------------------------------


To my surprise, the linzer torte did set up well enough to be sliced.
The trick was in letting it cool in the pan. It didn't come out looking
beautiful; it had that relaxed melted look, but it wasn't bad. It was
serviceable enough to take to my writing class last night, and they did
like it. Unfortuneately for my ego which likes to show off, another
classmate brought baked goodies too so I wasn't the center of attention.
(This class is after dinner and has nothing to do with baking.
There's no potluck aspect. I'd hoped I was the only one to think of
bringing treats.)


Linzer torte was originally filled with black cassis jam, has been
filled with raspberry in the U.S. where cassis jam was hard to find for
a long time, and nowadays is filled with any jam you like including
apricot, ligonberry, whatever. I don't know if the traditional nuts
were hazelnuts or almonds. (I've also seen recipes that call for
pecans.) I'm going with almonds because I like them.


I did replace the cocoa with extra flour, but the dough looked so wet
and sticky that I'm thinking it needed even more flour. I imagine that
the amount of flour depends on the humidity of day one is baking and the
exact properties of the flour used. Also, like most American home
bakers, the recipe called for volume measures, and I measured with
measuring cups, not a scale.


If I were going to make this again and try to perfect it, I might move
to scales. I'd also look for a recipe that isn't quite so sweet; I'd
practice rolling out the dough the thinner, and I'd put in a drop of
almond extract for a more pronounced almond flavor.


The recipe specifically asked for unblanched, raw, almonds that had been
ground, but would I get a more almondy flavor if I toasted the almonds
first? And would that affect the consistency of the dough and finished
product?


The reception was good, and I might bring treats again next Wednesday.
I'm thinking of something less complicated, maybe a loaf of banana bread
or a loaf of something using apples or pears. (The classmate brought a
lovely moist ginger cake. She bakes professionally.)


--------------------------------------------


Since then, I know I've been playing with using other recipes. They're
all over the web. I'd love your recipe translation. It's time I tried
again.


--Lia

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Old 29-11-2007, 11:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Michael Kuettner wrote:

Could you post that, please ?
I'd be interested how a Linzertorte can become a soup.



The recipe is the one in Joy of Cooking. I won't retype it here. It
should be easy for you to find.


Linzertorte becomes soup when the dough doesn't bake into a nice crust.
It remains mushy. The result is crumbs floating in jam. It tastes
wonderful, looks awful, and can be eaten as a pudding with a spoon.


--Lia



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Old 30-11-2007, 05:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julia Altshuler schrieb :
Michael Kuettner wrote:

Could you post that, please ?
I'd be interested how a Linzertorte can become a soup.



The recipe is the one in Joy of Cooking. I won't retype it here. It should
be easy for you to find.

Is that online somewhere ?


Linzertorte becomes soup when the dough doesn't bake into a nice crust. It
remains mushy. The result is crumbs floating in jam. It tastes wonderful,
looks awful, and can be eaten as a pudding with a spoon.

Well, here's how we do it.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner


Linzertorte

The dough :

300 grams flour
300 g finely grate walnuts or almonds
300 g butter
220 g sugar
1 egg
1 egg yolk
1 teaspoon powdered cloves
1 teaspoon powdered cinnamon
grated skin and juice of half a lemon

--------------------------------------

40 g almond shavings (roughly grated)
powdered sugar, mixed with vanilla
1 white wafer paper
cassis jam

Mix flour and butter well.
Now add the rest of the ingredients
and form a smooth dough quickly.
Let it rest in a cool place for half an hour.
Now press two thirds of the dough in a
(spring)form.
Put the wafer paper on top of the dough.
Spread the jam on the wafer paper, but let in
finger-thick edge free of jam.
With the rest of the dough,form a roll around the
cake and the lattice.
Dab the lattice with egg yolk.
Sprinkle with almond shavings.
Back roughly 50 minutes at low heat, until brown.
Take from oven, let it cool and sprinkle with powdered
sugar/vanilla mix.











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Old 30-11-2007, 05:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Thanks so much! It's been a while since I tried linzer torte again, and
this is the inspiration I've needed.


(For others who might have to look it up as I did, wafer paper is also
called rice paper or ostia. It is starch based and edible.)

--Lia


Michael Kuettner wrote:

Linzertorte

The dough :

300 grams flour
300 g finely grate walnuts or almonds
300 g butter
220 g sugar
1 egg
1 egg yolk
1 teaspoon powdered cloves
1 teaspoon powdered cinnamon
grated skin and juice of half a lemon

--------------------------------------

40 g almond shavings (roughly grated)
powdered sugar, mixed with vanilla
1 white wafer paper
cassis jam

Mix flour and butter well.
Now add the rest of the ingredients
and form a smooth dough quickly.
Let it rest in a cool place for half an hour.
Now press two thirds of the dough in a
(spring)form.
Put the wafer paper on top of the dough.
Spread the jam on the wafer paper, but let in
finger-thick edge free of jam.
With the rest of the dough,form a roll around the
cake and the lattice.
Dab the lattice with egg yolk.
Sprinkle with almond shavings.
Bake roughly 50 minutes at low heat, until brown.
Take from oven, let it cool and sprinkle with powdered
sugar/vanilla mix.


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Old 30-11-2007, 05:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julia Altshuler schrieb :

Thanks so much! It's been a while since I tried linzer torte again, and this
is the inspiration I've needed.

You're welcome !
That's as close to the version from 1719 as you'll get.
(It was invented earlier, but first written down in 1719).

I forgot to mention : Cut the wafer paper so that a thin edge of the dough
stays free of it (to press the outer dough roll onto).

Plus : If you substitute the cassis jam with a sweeter jam (like apricot),
use less powdered sugar .

(For others who might have to look it up as I did, wafer paper is also called
rice paper or ostia. It is starch based and edible.)

Just make sure that you get the thin one. There's a thicker version for
decorative baking.

Cheers,

Michael Kuettner




Michael Kuettner wrote:

Linzertorte

The dough :

300 grams flour
300 g finely grate walnuts or almonds
300 g butter
220 g sugar
1 egg
1 egg yolk
1 teaspoon powdered cloves
1 teaspoon powdered cinnamon
grated skin and juice of half a lemon

--------------------------------------

40 g almond shavings (roughly grated)
powdered sugar, mixed with vanilla
1 white wafer paper
cassis jam

Mix flour and butter well.
Now add the rest of the ingredients
and form a smooth dough quickly.
Let it rest in a cool place for half an hour.
Now press two thirds of the dough in a
(spring)form.
Put the wafer paper on top of the dough.
Spread the jam on the wafer paper, but let in
finger-thick edge free of jam.
With the rest of the dough,form a roll around the
cake and the lattice.
Dab the lattice with egg yolk.
Sprinkle with almond shavings.
Bake roughly 50 minutes at low heat, until brown.
Take from oven, let it cool and sprinkle with powdered
sugar/vanilla mix.






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