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I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow. He's
asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff. No problem.
Dinner will be between 2-3PM.

My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she is... she
lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly. She
seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)

Scott's making shrimp cocktail. According to Scott she won't touch shrimp.
Or any kind of seafood or fish. She says it's "yukky". Okay, more shrimp
for us!

Scott is roasting new potatoes with the turkey instead of making mashed
potatoes. Doesn't matter. She won't eat potatoes. It's not a no or low
carb thing. She simply won't eat potatoes. She doesn't eat any sort of
vegetables, cooked or raw. Nor rice, beans or legumes. She'll eat certain
types of pasta she can identify, such as macaroni.

We have figured out she won't eat his dressing because it contains onions
and celery, unless she can't detect it. She has eyes like a microscope,
tearing everything apart for some small something she doesn't like. She
certainly won't eat my squash casserole! LOL

The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee, sorry,
I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...

Crackers to go with the cheese? Scott bought a big package of variety
"entertainment" crackers at Costco. From plain table-water crackers to
crackers with various seasonings. He said if she spots a speck of
*anything* in the crackers (like poppy seeds) she'll ask, "What's that
speck?" and refuse to eat them. Apparently the only thing she'll eat is
saltines. And we're talking about a 60 year old woman. Oh good lord! I
thought I was picky!

She asked what she could bring and Scott had to refrain from saying,
"Something you're willing to eat?!" LOL Well, we aren't catering to her.
He suggested she bring some rolls. She said she'd get some of those Wonder
Bread soft dinner rolls from the day old bakery. Scott snapped. He just
paid them $300 to clean his house - since apparently this is what they do
for a living. (He couldn't do the cleaning in that huge house while still
recuperating from surgery.) Scott told me said, "Dammit, at least pick up
some ****ing Pillsbury crescent rolls or something!"

I had to soothe him and offer to pick up some rolls on the way over. I
happen to like the sourdough rolls from the Schnuck's bakery and so does he.
They get nice and crispy on the outside and are nice and moist on the
inside. Oh, but Audrey probably wouldn't eat those because she has no idea
what sourdough is. She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it
is it must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
WHATEVER.

Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.

Jill


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In article >,
"jmcquown" > wrote:


> seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
> ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)


Sounds like you're pretty picky. Why are you obsessing about this?
Just let her starve.


> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.



I don't like turkey.

:-)
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jmcquown wrote:
>
> She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it is it
> must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
> WHATEVER.


I'd advise to steer clear of mental cases like her.
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"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow. He's
> asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff. No
> problem.
> Dinner will be between 2-3PM.
>
> My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she is...
> she
> lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly. She
> seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater
> he's
> ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)
>
> Scott's making shrimp cocktail. According to Scott she won't touch
> shrimp.
> Or any kind of seafood or fish. She says it's "yukky". Okay, more shrimp
> for us!
>
> Scott is roasting new potatoes with the turkey instead of making mashed
> potatoes. Doesn't matter. She won't eat potatoes. It's not a no or low
> carb thing. She simply won't eat potatoes. She doesn't eat any sort of
> vegetables, cooked or raw. Nor rice, beans or legumes. She'll eat
> certain
> types of pasta she can identify, such as macaroni.
>
> We have figured out she won't eat his dressing because it contains onions
> and celery, unless she can't detect it. She has eyes like a microscope,
> tearing everything apart for some small something she doesn't like. She
> certainly won't eat my squash casserole! LOL
>
> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee,
> sorry,
> I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...
>
> Crackers to go with the cheese? Scott bought a big package of variety
> "entertainment" crackers at Costco. From plain table-water crackers to
> crackers with various seasonings. He said if she spots a speck of
> *anything* in the crackers (like poppy seeds) she'll ask, "What's that
> speck?" and refuse to eat them. Apparently the only thing she'll eat is
> saltines. And we're talking about a 60 year old woman. Oh good lord! I
> thought I was picky!
>
> She asked what she could bring and Scott had to refrain from saying,
> "Something you're willing to eat?!" LOL Well, we aren't catering to her.
> He suggested she bring some rolls. She said she'd get some of those
> Wonder
> Bread soft dinner rolls from the day old bakery. Scott snapped. He just
> paid them $300 to clean his house - since apparently this is what they do
> for a living. (He couldn't do the cleaning in that huge house while still
> recuperating from surgery.) Scott told me said, "Dammit, at least pick up
> some ****ing Pillsbury crescent rolls or something!"
>
> I had to soothe him and offer to pick up some rolls on the way over. I
> happen to like the sourdough rolls from the Schnuck's bakery and so does
> he.
> They get nice and crispy on the outside and are nice and moist on the
> inside. Oh, but Audrey probably wouldn't eat those because she has no
> idea
> what sourdough is. She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it
> is it must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
> WHATEVER.
>
> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.


Wow! I thought I was picky, but I have a reason to be with my food
allergies. I don't expect people to cater to me though. I will often bring
my own food if I think they won't have anything suitable, or at least bring
something large to share with everyone.

I can't imagine how she gets along eating no vegetables. That's just sad.


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Dan Abel wrote:
> In article >,
> "jmcquown" > wrote:
>
>
>> seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky
>> eater he's ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me!
>> (laughing)

>
> Sounds like you're pretty picky. Why are you obsessing about this?
> Just let her starve.
>

Obsessing? I mention her one time (have never shared a meal with her in my
life) and I'm obsessing?? Sheesh. Where did you get this idea?

>
>> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.

>
>
> I don't like turkey.
>
> :-)


I don't either (and he knows it) but I'll eat a little bit to be polite. In
fact, when I'm invited to dinner I always do that, even if I don't like what
is being served. You don't have to scarf down a huge portion of something
you don't like. But unless you have religious or medical reasons not to eat
something, I'm of the opinion you should take a small portion (a
tablespoonful suffices) so as not to offend the host/hostess. It's the only
reason I've ever tasted that gawd-awful green bean casserole made with cream
of mushroom soup and canned fried onions. LOL

Jill




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Julie Bove wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>> I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow.
>> He's asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff.
>> No problem.
>> Dinner will be between 2-3PM.
>>
>> My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she
>> is... she
>> lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly.
>> She seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky
>> eater he's
>> ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)
>>

>
> Wow! I thought I was picky, but I have a reason to be with my food
> allergies. I don't expect people to cater to me though. I will
> often bring my own food if I think they won't have anything suitable,
> or at least bring something large to share with everyone.
>

Obviously we aren't catering to her. Food allergies we would certainly make
allowances for. Any dietary restrictions, we'd make allowances for. This
level of pickiness, however, is just plain ridiculous.

Oh, and I didn't mean to sound so gleeful in my original post about the
cheeses I'd bought which she won't eat. I honestly didn't know until I
talked with Scott last night *after* I'd bought cheeses for us to snack on
that she would only eat mild cheddar. Sorry, but I didn't buy mild cheddar.

> I can't imagine how she gets along eating no vegetables. That's just
> sad.


I'm fussy about not liking raw veggies. It's not so much the taste as it is
a texture thing with me. But I'll eat just about any cooked veggie there
is. Guess it's a good thing I didn't plan to bring artichoke hearts... oh
wait, I have a jar of them I could take with me


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"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...

> I'm fussy about not liking raw veggies. It's not so much the taste as it
> is
> a texture thing with me. But I'll eat just about any cooked veggie there
> is. Guess it's a good thing I didn't plan to bring artichoke hearts... oh
> wait, I have a jar of them I could take with me


I'm just the opposite. I'll eat pretty much anything raw but potatoes.


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Julie Bove wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>> I'm fussy about not liking raw veggies. It's not so much the taste
>> as it is
>> a texture thing with me. But I'll eat just about any cooked veggie
>> there is. Guess it's a good thing I didn't plan to bring artichoke
>> hearts... oh wait, I have a jar of them I could take with me

>
> I'm just the opposite. I'll eat pretty much anything raw but
> potatoes.


Yeah, but raw potatoes are gross. Cooked potatoes are a joy


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On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 02:35:39 -0600, "jmcquown"
> wrote:

>It's the only
>reason I've ever tasted that gawd-awful green bean casserole made with cream
>of mushroom soup and canned fried onions. LOL


Wash your mouth out with soap, girlie. It's not god awful.

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"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
> ever encountered in his life.


So go to somewhere like Walgreens and get a loaf of Wonder Bread Kids (the
stuff with the crusts cut off).




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On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 23:22:28 -0600, "jmcquown"
> wrote:

>The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee, sorry,
>I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...


I bet she'll like the Colby.... unless it's one of those things she
hasn't heard of.



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jmcquown wrote:
> I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow. He's
> asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff. No problem.
> Dinner will be between 2-3PM.
>
> My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she is... she
> lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly. She
> seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
> ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)
>
> Scott's making shrimp cocktail. According to Scott she won't touch shrimp.
> Or any kind of seafood or fish. She says it's "yukky". Okay, more shrimp
> for us!
>
> Scott is roasting new potatoes with the turkey instead of making mashed
> potatoes. Doesn't matter. She won't eat potatoes. It's not a no or low
> carb thing. She simply won't eat potatoes. She doesn't eat any sort of
> vegetables, cooked or raw. Nor rice, beans or legumes. She'll eat certain
> types of pasta she can identify, such as macaroni.
>
> We have figured out she won't eat his dressing because it contains onions
> and celery, unless she can't detect it. She has eyes like a microscope,
> tearing everything apart for some small something she doesn't like. She
> certainly won't eat my squash casserole! LOL
>
> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee, sorry,
> I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...
>
> Crackers to go with the cheese? Scott bought a big package of variety
> "entertainment" crackers at Costco. From plain table-water crackers to
> crackers with various seasonings. He said if she spots a speck of
> *anything* in the crackers (like poppy seeds) she'll ask, "What's that
> speck?" and refuse to eat them. Apparently the only thing she'll eat is
> saltines. And we're talking about a 60 year old woman. Oh good lord! I
> thought I was picky!
>
> She asked what she could bring and Scott had to refrain from saying,
> "Something you're willing to eat?!" LOL Well, we aren't catering to her.
> He suggested she bring some rolls. She said she'd get some of those Wonder
> Bread soft dinner rolls from the day old bakery. Scott snapped. He just
> paid them $300 to clean his house - since apparently this is what they do
> for a living. (He couldn't do the cleaning in that huge house while still
> recuperating from surgery.) Scott told me said, "Dammit, at least pick up
> some ****ing Pillsbury crescent rolls or something!"
>
> I had to soothe him and offer to pick up some rolls on the way over. I
> happen to like the sourdough rolls from the Schnuck's bakery and so does he.
> They get nice and crispy on the outside and are nice and moist on the
> inside. Oh, but Audrey probably wouldn't eat those because she has no idea
> what sourdough is. She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it
> is it must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
> WHATEVER.
>
> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.
>
> Jill
>
>


Screw her, I say. Serve what you serve, and if she complains, too
freaking bad.

--
-Gina in Italy

http://www.myspace.com/ravenlynne1975
I'm a blogger: http://ravenwolflodge.blogspot.com
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"jmcquown" > wrote in

> Apparently the only thing she'll eat is saltines.


> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.
>
> Jill


Saltines, turkey and water?

You metioned raw potatoes. I remember slicing potatoes and taking
a slice, sprinkling salt on it and eating it raw. Not bad at all.
Ah... childhood memories.

Happy Thanksgiving to all, BTW!
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ravenlynne said...

> Screw her, I say. Serve what you serve, and if she complains, too
> freaking bad.


You should've invited me! I'd cream pie her in the face at the dinner table.

I'm NOT bashful!

"Dinner has been served Ma'am!"

Andy
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On Nov 21, 11:22 pm, "jmcquown" > wrote:
> My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she is... she
> lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly. She
> seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
> ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)
> > Jill


Audry? As in Little Shop of Horrors? I wonder . . . . naw!


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HiTech RedNeck wrote:
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>> But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
>> ever encountered in his life.

>
> So go to somewhere like Walgreens and get a loaf of Wonder Bread Kids
> (the stuff with the crusts cut off).


I'm sure she can do that for herself. She's about 60 years old and was
going to bring some Wonder Bread type rolls. I'll pick up the sourdough on
my way over


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sf wrote:
> On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 02:35:39 -0600, "jmcquown"
> > wrote:
>
>> It's the only
>> reason I've ever tasted that gawd-awful green bean casserole made
>> with cream of mushroom soup and canned fried onions. LOL

>
> Wash your mouth out with soap, girlie. It's not god awful.


Sorry, but to me it is! Doesn't matter, she wouldn't eat it anyway. It has
green beans in it! And mushrooms (such as they are) in the soup! And the
canned fried onions!


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sf wrote:
> On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 23:22:28 -0600, "jmcquown"
> > wrote:
>
>> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee, sorry,
>> I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...

>
> I bet she'll like the Colby.... unless it's one of those things she
> hasn't heard of.
>
>
>

Colby is just too dang mild for me. I like extra sharp cheddars.
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jmcquown wrote:
> HiTech RedNeck wrote:
>> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
>>> ever encountered in his life.

>> So go to somewhere like Walgreens and get a loaf of Wonder Bread Kids
>> (the stuff with the crusts cut off).

>
> I'm sure she can do that for herself. She's about 60 years old and was
> going to bring some Wonder Bread type rolls. I'll pick up the sourdough on
> my way over
>

Ewwwwwwwwwww. Why does her being that old just seem to make it seem even
ickier? For gawdsake..They're not supposed to be so juvenile acting.
Let her fend for herself, I say.
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"Julie Bove" > wrote

> Wow! I thought I was picky, but I have a reason to be with my food
> allergies. I don't expect people to cater to me though. I will often
> bring my own food if I think they won't have anything suitable, or at
> least bring something large to share with everyone.


My brother is inexplicably allergic to everything ... none of the rest
of us are. No dairy, no onions, no garlic!! He brings his own food.
As we speak I'm kicking myself that I didn't put aside some plain
mashed butternut.

> I can't imagine how she gets along eating no vegetables. That's just sad.


This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.

I think most people would.

nancy




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Goomba38 wrote:
> sf wrote:
>> On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 23:22:28 -0600, "jmcquown"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar.
>>> Gee, sorry, I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's
>>> too bad...

>>
>> I bet she'll like the Colby.... unless it's one of those things she
>> hasn't heard of.
>>
>>
>>

> Colby is just too dang mild for me. I like extra sharp cheddars.


This woman doesn't even like "specks" of stuff in her crackers. You can
pretty much rule out sharp anything. How boring it must be! I gather she
likes Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tomato soup. It doesn't have
"stuff" in it. Little does she know... LOL


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Goomba38 wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>> HiTech RedNeck wrote:
>>> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
>>>> ever encountered in his life.
>>> So go to somewhere like Walgreens and get a loaf of Wonder Bread
>>> Kids (the stuff with the crusts cut off).

>>
>> I'm sure she can do that for herself. She's about 60 years old and
>> was going to bring some Wonder Bread type rolls. I'll pick up the
>> sourdough on my way over
>>

> Ewwwwwwwwwww. Why does her being that old just seem to make it seem
> even ickier? For gawdsake..They're not supposed to be so juvenile
> acting. Let her fend for herself, I say.


She will. We aren't accomodating her. What's really weird is she's with my
oldest brother who thinks the hotter the better when it comes to food.
(Mentally he never left Thailand.) Don't know how she survives in that
household!


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Nancy Young wrote:
> This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
> won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
> eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
> I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
> something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.
>

I'll find out this afternoon. I don't think she makes a big deal about it,
she just passes on everything offered. So everyone else has a little bit of
each on their plate and she has... in this case, I guess some turkey. LOL


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Nancy Young wrote:
> This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
> won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
> eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
> I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
> something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.
>
> I think most people would.
>
> nancy
>
>


Seriously! I don't go to people's house and point out what I don't eat.
I just shut my trap and eat what I do eat. What I hate is when people
ASK you if you've tried xyz or why you aren't eating xyz. That's tacky.

--
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http://www.myspace.com/ravenlynne1975
I'm a blogger: http://ravenwolflodge.blogspot.com
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On Nov 22, 12:22 am, "jmcquown" > wrote:

> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee, sorry,
> I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...
>


A little passive aggressive, wouldn't you say, Jill? Would it have
killed you to buy just one thing this woman will eat?
Picky or not, it's quite obvious you have no respect for your brother
or his companion.
it's clear to me who the bitch in this scenario is. And it's not the
picky eater.


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ravenlynne wrote:
>
> Screw her, I say.


She probably wouldn't like that either :-)


> Serve what you serve, and if she complains, too
> freaking bad.



I agree. You can't win with picky people. If someone needs to accommodate
it should be the guest. Since other people are bringing things, she can
bring something she likes.
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"ravenlynne" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:
>> This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
>> won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
>> eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
>> I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
>> something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.
>>
>> I think most people would.


> Seriously! I don't go to people's house and point out what I don't eat. I
> just shut my trap and eat what I do eat. What I hate is when people ASK
> you if you've tried xyz or why you aren't eating xyz. That's tacky.


A few years ago I was having a hell of a time getting food down,
but I'd fake it in company. My sil's father, I love him, but in his
loud voice, Is that all you're eating?? Why aren't you eating more,
it's Thanksgiving! Oh, I'm not hungry, I had something before we
came. Who eats before Thanksgiving dinner?? he boomed.

Can't get anything past those goombas. (laugh) (and no offense to
our goomba, it's an affectionate term where I came from)

nancy


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Nancy Young wrote:
> "ravenlynne" > wrote
>
>> Nancy Young wrote:
>>> This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
>>> won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
>>> eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
>>> I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
>>> something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.
>>>
>>> I think most people would.

>
>> Seriously! I don't go to people's house and point out what I don't
>> eat. I just shut my trap and eat what I do eat. What I hate is when
>> people ASK you if you've tried xyz or why you aren't eating xyz.
>> That's tacky.

>
> A few years ago I was having a hell of a time getting food down,
> but I'd fake it in company. My sil's father, I love him, but in his
> loud voice, Is that all you're eating?? Why aren't you eating more,
> it's Thanksgiving! Oh, I'm not hungry, I had something before we
> came. Who eats before Thanksgiving dinner?? he boomed.
>
> Can't get anything past those goombas. (laugh) (and no offense to
> our goomba, it's an affectionate term where I came from)
>
> nancy


LOL Yeah, I can relate to that. When I was married I had to go to four
Thanksgiving dinners on my ex-husband's side. First at his mother's house
(gawd, her dressing was runny and just awful!), then his grandparent's house
(I loved them and she was a wonderful cook!). Then to his uncle's house
where all he talked about was how wealthy he was and he had the food
catered... his wife couldn't be bothered with cooking. Then his aunt's
house, which was in a crack neighborhood and consisted of one of those
turkey rolls in "gravy". Oh, joy!

Who can eat five meals in one afternoon? Apparently I was expected to do
this. I hated every minute of it. Somewhere in there we squeezed in dinner
with my parents. So people keep asking, "Why aren't you eating?" Um,
because I already did?!! Enough already!

No wonder I prefer a nice quiet day at home with a good book and maybe a
DVD. Wish I could do that today but I promised Scott. And he needs help.
He's still in some pain from the surgery and tires very easily.

Jill


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Dave Smith wrote:
> wrote:
>
>
>> A little passive aggressive, wouldn't you say, Jill? Would it have
>> killed you to buy just one thing this woman will eat?
>> Picky or not, it's quite obvious you have no respect for your brother
>> or his companion.
>> it's clear to me who the bitch in this scenario is. And it's not the
>> picky eater.

>
>
> Poppycock. Consider the alternatives. They could forgo all the
> things they like for the sake of someone who picky and then everyone
> else suffers, or they could have a confrontation over it.
>

There's no confrontation. She either finds or brings something she can eat
or not. We aren't catering to her whims. I didn't even know about her
preference about only *one* type of cheese and no "stuff" in crackers until
after I'd gone shopping.

> I know what it is like. I have had my brother and his family over for
> Christmas dinner for the past few years. His oldest one (in his 30s)
> is a very picky eater. Luckily he likes turkey and some vegetables.
> Dessert was a problem. We had the usual items that are traditional in
> our family, Christmas pudding, dark and light fruitcakes, mincemeat,
> short breads, brownies, Black forest squares, a few other types of
> cookies and fruit. You would think that they were be something for
> everyone there. The kid looks at the dessert spread and whines aloud
> "There's nothing for me. I don't like any of that stuff." the next
> year I suggested that his mother bring something that he will eat.


He's in his 30's and he can't bring something himself?! That's a shame!
This woman is at least 60. She'll probably bring some Wonder Bread rolls
and have that and some turkey. It's not up to us to cater to anyone, be
they adults or children.

As I said in my original post, I have no problem trying to accomodate food
allergies or health conditions. But just plain being picky? Nope. Deal
with your food issues yourself; don't expect me to do it for you.

Jill <---going to buy sourdough rolls on the way to Scott's house


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jmcquown wrote:
> I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow. He's
> asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff. No problem.
> Dinner will be between 2-3PM.
>



> My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she is... she
> lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly. She
> seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
> ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)



> She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it
> is it must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
> WHATEVER.
>
> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.
>
> Jill



That's just WRONG and RUDE, dammit. People who are that close-minded
should spend most of their time living alone in a closet.

Lots of people have one or two things they won't eat, but she sounds
like a head case. Turkey and water sounds about right.

gloria p

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jmcquown wrote:

> This woman doesn't even like "specks" of stuff in her crackers. You can
> pretty much rule out sharp anything. How boring it must be! I gather she
> likes Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tomato soup. It doesn't have
> "stuff" in it. Little does she know... LOL


I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
pretty dull in the sack too....
I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's niece?
Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room together...? LOL

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ravenlynne wrote:
> Nancy Young wrote:
>> This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
>> won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
>> eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
>> I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
>> something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.
>>
>> I think most people would.
>>
>> nancy
>>

>
> Seriously! I don't go to people's house and point out what I don't eat.
> I just shut my trap and eat what I do eat. What I hate is when people
> ASK you if you've tried xyz or why you aren't eating xyz. That's tacky.
>


Um.. yeah.. 'cept in Italian households. Then it is ALL open for
discussion.. lol.
We get our feelings hurt and know you're rejecting *us* if you don't eat
our food...
Dysfunctional Goomba
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Nancy Young wrote:

> A few years ago I was having a hell of a time getting food down,
> but I'd fake it in company. My sil's father, I love him, but in his
> loud voice, Is that all you're eating?? Why aren't you eating more,
> it's Thanksgiving! Oh, I'm not hungry, I had something before we
> came. Who eats before Thanksgiving dinner?? he boomed.
>
> Can't get anything past those goombas. (laugh) (and no offense to
> our goomba, it's an affectionate term where I came from)
>
> nancy
>

<Hoots and hollers in recognition even before reading that last line!!!!>
I just replied to another post saying just about this same thing.
It is in our DNA. What can I say? It *will* be discussed, but the gist
of it is to *not* take any of it personally. We're just looking for
affirmation that you love *us* by using our food as the tangible evidence.


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jmcquown wrote:

> LOL Yeah, I can relate to that. When I was married I had to go to four
> Thanksgiving dinners on my ex-husband's side. First at his mother's house
> (gawd, her dressing was runny and just awful!), then his grandparent's house
> (I loved them and she was a wonderful cook!). Then to his uncle's house
> where all he talked about was how wealthy he was and he had the food
> catered... his wife couldn't be bothered with cooking. Then his aunt's
> house, which was in a crack neighborhood and consisted of one of those
> turkey rolls in "gravy". Oh, joy!


Why didn't you just invite all them over to your home for dinner?
Wouldn't that have been easier..not to mention seriously diplomatic and
"bonding"
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Puester wrote:

> That's just WRONG and RUDE, dammit. People who are that close-minded
> should spend most of their time living alone in a closet.
>
> Lots of people have one or two things they won't eat, but she sounds
> like a head case. Turkey and water sounds about right.
>
> gloria p
>

My oldest sister, in her fifties and never married, seems to get a
little stranger each year she lives alone. Less adaptable to change,
more picky and obsessive about things. So hence less enjoyable to be
around and probably becomes even more odd or closed minded from the
(often self imposed) isolation? I dunno..???
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In article >,
ravenlynne > wrote:

> Nancy Young wrote:
> > This woman must have gotten a LOT of mileage with her list of
> > won't-eats. Mememememe! must be her favorite song. So don't
> > eat, lady, see who cares. I know that sounds mean, but really, if
> > I had all these issues I would have figured out to find or bring
> > something I would eat and not make a big deal about it.
> >
> > I think most people would.

>
> Seriously! I don't go to people's house and point out what I don't eat.
> I just shut my trap and eat what I do eat. What I hate is when people
> ASK you if you've tried xyz or why you aren't eating xyz. That's tacky.


I don't mind that. After all, it is a bit unusual for someone to not
try _any_ of the bread, or things with breadcrumbs and etc.

What I mind is the big song-and-dance about "well, what _can_ you eat,
then?" when I say I haven't tried the bread because I can't eat wheat.

What, no bread at all? No, unless I make my own from spelt.
No biscuits? No.
No cake? At all? No.
No crackers, pies, bagels, scones, cupcakes, doughnuts, sausage rolls,
savouries, sandwiches, etcetcetc... NO!

It gets a bit old, especially when there is a world of tasty, healthy
food out there that I can and DO eat that doesn't have wheat in it!

Miche (sorry for the rant)

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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jmcquown wrote:

>
> He's in his 30's and he can't bring something himself?!


He lives at home with his parents and spends all his money and time on
computer games. There is not much more to say. He especially dislikes
anything red.

> That's a shame!
> This woman is at least 60. She'll probably bring some Wonder Bread rolls
> and have that and some turkey. It's not up to us to cater to anyone, be
> they adults or children.



I agree. I think the worst situation I ever ran into was a great niece who
showed up at Boxing Day family Christmas gathering. I didn't know she was
around. I didn't know that she was a vegan. Her father had planned to bring
some vegan food with him but he forgot it at home. Plus they showed up at
the last minute, so my wife was running around trying to find something
that she could eat and she had to read all the ingredients. A year and a
half later she was sitting across from me in a restaurant with a breakfast
buffet and I was naturally curious about what she had found to eat at the
buffet tables....... bacon, ham, roast beef.....

And that is one of the major reasons I refuse to cater to fad diets.

> As I said in my original post, I have no problem trying to accomodate food
> allergies or health conditions. But just plain being picky? Nope. Deal
> with your food issues yourself; don't expect me to do it for you.


There is picky and their is pure childishness. There is no way I am going
to dumb down a dinner for a picky person. A traditional Thanksgiving dinner
around here is roast turkey with stuffing, gravy, mashed potatoes, squash,
beans, corn, salad, rolls, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and/or apple pie,
fruit and cheese plate. If someone can't find something to eat out of all
that they should plan on stopping at McDonalds on the way there or the way
back.
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jmcquown wrote:
>
> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.



Does she like sex?
It's a theory I got from this usenet group: People who don't like food
don't like sex.


--Lia

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