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On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 09:49:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
> wrote:

wrote:
>> On Nov 22, 12:22 am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>
>>> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar.
>>> Gee, sorry, I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's
>>> too bad...
>>>

>>
>> A little passive aggressive, wouldn't you say, Jill? Would it have
>> killed you to buy just one thing this woman will eat?

>
>How can I possibly know what she will eat? I did my shopping based on what
>my brothers and I like. I'm not catering to this woman; there's no reason
>anyone should. She can bring her own damn food if she's going to be so
>picky about everything.
>
>> Picky or not, it's quite obvious you have no respect for your brother
>> or his companion.

>
>You've got that right. Given the choice this brother and his companion
>wouldn't be there at all. I'll send them over to your place and let you
>deal with them!
>


if i had to bet, i'd bet she won't complain half as much as you have
already.

your pal,
blake
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jmcquown wrote:
>
> As I said in my original post, I have no problem trying to accomodate food
> allergies or health conditions.



Speaking of health conditions, how's this guest's health and general
condition? There's no risk to health if you don't eat poppy seeds, but
never eating any fruits or any vegetables? I should think there would
be a lack of vitamins, minerals, and fiber in her diet. You don't need
a lot of variety in those areas, but you do need some. If there were
one fruit or vegetable she liked, even if it was just an apple a day and
some carrot sticks, I wouldn't have such a tough time imagining it.


--Lia

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In article >,
Dave Smith > wrote:

> jmcquown wrote:


> > As I said in my original post, I have no problem trying to accomodate food
> > allergies or health conditions. But just plain being picky? Nope. Deal
> > with your food issues yourself; don't expect me to do it for you.

>
> There is picky and their is pure childishness. There is no way I am going
> to dumb down a dinner for a picky person. A traditional Thanksgiving dinner
> around here is roast turkey with stuffing, gravy, mashed potatoes, squash,
> beans, corn, salad, rolls, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and/or apple pie,
> fruit and cheese plate. If someone can't find something to eat out of all
> that they should plan on stopping at McDonalds on the way there or the way
> back.


There's "bits" in McDonald's.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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Goomba38 wrote:
>
> jmcquown wrote:
>
> > This woman doesn't even like "specks" of stuff in her crackers. You can
> > pretty much rule out sharp anything. How boring it must be! I gather she
> > likes Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tomato soup. It doesn't have
> > "stuff" in it. Little does she know... LOL

>
> I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
> pretty dull in the sack too....


My wife has a framed newspaper article that a messy house usually means a
dynamite sex life. Our house is admittedly messy.


> I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
> Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's niece?


LOL I haven't ever seen her not eat something. There are things that she
likes better than others, but she will get to the B list after she has
polished off the A list.



> Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room together...? LOL


Not a problem. There wouldn't be any food left that she doesn't like.


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Abe wrote:
>> jmcquown wrote:
>>> She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it is it
>>> must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
>>> WHATEVER.

>> I'd advise to steer clear of mental cases like her.

> There's clearly something screwy in her upbringing that has affected
> this way. I don't think she sees that she has a choice in the matter.
> It's called a mental illness.


Why would you blame a person's mental illness on her parents?

Serene
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Oh pshaw, on Thu 22 Nov 2007 11:46:43a, Goomba38 meant to say...

> jmcquown wrote:
>
>> This woman doesn't even like "specks" of stuff in her crackers. You can
>> pretty much rule out sharp anything. How boring it must be! I gather

she
>> likes Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tomato soup. It doesn't have
>> "stuff" in it. Little does she know... LOL

>
> I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
> pretty dull in the sack too....
> I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
> Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's niece?
> Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room together...? LOL
>
>


Dave's niece would probably eat her.

--
Wayne Boatwright

Thu, 11(XI)/22(XXII)/07(MMVII)
¦ Today is: Thanksgiving Day (U.S.) ¦
¦ A mind is a terrible thing to lose... ¦
|_| _, _ _
| |(_||_)|_)\_|
___ | ._|
| |_ _ ,_ |/ , _ . .,_ _
| | |(_|| ||\/_)(_|||/|| |(_|
._| ._|
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Oh pshaw, on Thu 22 Nov 2007 04:07:43p, T meant to say...

> In article >,
> says...
>> I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow.
>> He's asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff. No
>> problem. Dinner will be between 2-3PM.
>>
>> My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she
>> is... she lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once,
>> briefly. She seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the
>> most picky eater he's ever encountered in his life. Even compared to
>> me! (laughing)
>>
>> Scott's making shrimp cocktail. According to Scott she won't touch
>> shrimp. Or any kind of seafood or fish. She says it's "yukky". Okay,
>> more shrimp for us!

>
> One of the couples dining with use this evening says he's allergic to
> seafood in general, including fish. I asked if he'd ever been tested and
> he said that he hadn't.
>
> I then told him I know he'd had shrimp at my place and suffered no
> reaction. Should have seen the look on his face.
>
> Then of course one of the other people here didn't like turkey so
> brought a pork shoulder.
>
> I'm a little put off by that.
>
>


I never tell guests ahead of time what I'm going to be serving for dinner.
That is part of the adventure of going to a dinner party. Of course, on
Thanksgiving, people will usually assume turkey.

I cook what I think will be an interesting and (hopefully) delicious meal.
If they choose not to eat it, so be it. If they want to bring _their_
whole meal becuase they suspect they won't like mine, then they can eat it
in the kitchen or take it home and eat it.

I like to cater to my guests, but some things are just absurd.

--
Wayne Boatwright

Thu, 11(XI)/22(XXII)/07(MMVII)
¦ Today is: Thanksgiving Day (U.S.) ¦
¦ A mind is a terrible thing to lose... ¦
|_| _, _ _
| |(_||_)|_)\_|
___ | ._|
| |_ _ ,_ |/ , _ . .,_ _
| | |(_|| ||\/_)(_|||/|| |(_|
._| ._|
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Serene wrote:
> Abe wrote:
>>> jmcquown wrote:
>>>> She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it is it
>>>> must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
>>>> WHATEVER.
>>> I'd advise to steer clear of mental cases like her.

>> There's clearly something screwy in her upbringing that has affected
>> this way. I don't think she sees that she has a choice in the matter.
>> It's called a mental illness.

>
> Why would you blame a person's mental illness on her parents?
>

I seriously doubt she has a mental illness. She's just an extremely picky
eater. Apparently (yes) it's the way she was raised. She only eats food
she was fed as a child. Granted, now that she's 60 she should have spread
her wings a little bit. But she's certainly not mentally ill.




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Goomba38 wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>
>> LOL Yeah, I can relate to that. When I was married I had to go to
>> four Thanksgiving dinners on my ex-husband's side. First at his
>> mother's house (gawd, her dressing was runny and just awful!), then
>> his grandparent's house (I loved them and she was a wonderful
>> cook!). Then to his uncle's house where all he talked about was how
>> wealthy he was and he had the food catered... his wife couldn't be
>> bothered with cooking. Then his aunt's house, which was in a crack
>> neighborhood and consisted of one of those turkey rolls in "gravy".
>> Oh, joy!

>
> Why didn't you just invite all them over to your home for dinner?
> Wouldn't that have been easier..not to mention seriously diplomatic
> and "bonding"


You mean when I was married? Because our table seated four and I seriously
didn't like most of those people.


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Abe > wrote in news:gs6bk3pjp8vfa3a2u8jn05coqvrh4g031n@
4ax.com:

>>jmcquown wrote:
>>>
>>> She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it is it
>>> must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
>>> WHATEVER.

>>


> I'd advise to steer clear of mental cases like her.
> There's clearly something screwy in her upbringing that has affected
> this way. I don't think she sees that she has a choice in the matter.
> It's called a mental illness.



Or it could be neurobiological. Disorders on the autism spectrum, for
example, can cause severe food aversions in some.

K
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Oh pshaw, on Thu 22 Nov 2007 11:46:43a, Goomba38 meant to say...
>
>> jmcquown wrote:
>>
>>> This woman doesn't even like "specks" of stuff in her crackers.
>>> You can pretty much rule out sharp anything. How boring it must
>>> be! I gather she likes Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tomato
>>> soup. It doesn't have "stuff" in it. Little does she know... LOL

>>
>> I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
>> pretty dull in the sack too....
>> I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
>> Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's niece?
>> Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room together...? LOL
>>

>
> Dave's niece would probably eat her.
>

ROFL Yep, probably so!


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Julia Altshuler wrote:
> wrote:
>>
>> A little passive aggressive, wouldn't you say, Jill? Would it have
>> killed you to buy just one thing this woman will eat?
>> Picky or not, it's quite obvious you have no respect for your brother
>> or his companion.
>> it's clear to me who the bitch in this scenario is. And it's not the
>> picky eater.

>
>
> Nonsense. The woman likes turkey, and there will be plenty at the
> table. She asks the guest to bring rolls that the guest likes and
> serves them along with some that everyone else will like better. The
> gracious thing to do is what the original poster is doing. She
> serves a nice meal, doesn't call undue attention to the picky guest
> at the table, and lets off steam here where it won't do the guest any
> harm.
>

Thanks, Lia. Actually, the dinner was at my brother's house. And while I
let off a little steam *here* and poked fun at her pickiness on rfc (I don't
really understand pickiness to that extreme), I surely wouldn't have taunted
her with it face to face. IMy brother, on the other hand, wouldn't let up
on her all day long. He'd say, "Surely you'll eat this" and "are you sure
you won't try some of that?" He even used the expression "dumb down" when
he said there's only so much he can do to accomodate her. She never asked
anyone to accomodate her!

And he made a big production after he found out she'd eat green beans <gasp>
of making sure everyone knew they weren't sauteed with mushrooms because she
won't eat mushrooms but she'll eat cream of mushroom soup. He nagged at her
about what she wouldn't eat *all day long*. If it was me I'd have punched
him right in the mouth.

This behaviour served to remind me why I haven't had Thanksgiving dinner at
his house for a lonnnng time. He was picking on everyone all day. I was so
glad to get back home!


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Julia Altshuler wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>>
>> Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.

>
> Does she like sex?
> It's a theory I got from this usenet group: People who don't like
> food don't like sex.
>

How should I know? I don't live with her!




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Good Grief.... You've just described my mother-in-law.

Could God have made two of them ??




On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 23:22:28 -0600, "jmcquown" > wrote:

>I'm going to my brother Scott's house to help with dinner tomorrow. He's
>asked me to come over around 11AM to help with prep and stuff. No problem.
>Dinner will be between 2-3PM.
>
>My oldest brother Paul and his "girlfriend" (at least we think she is... she
>lives with him) Audry is coming as well. I met her once, briefly. She
>seems very nice. But she is, according to Scott, the most picky eater he's
>ever encountered in his life. Even compared to me! (laughing)
>
>Scott's making shrimp cocktail. According to Scott she won't touch shrimp.
>Or any kind of seafood or fish. She says it's "yukky". Okay, more shrimp
>for us!
>
>Scott is roasting new potatoes with the turkey instead of making mashed
>potatoes. Doesn't matter. She won't eat potatoes. It's not a no or low
>carb thing. She simply won't eat potatoes. She doesn't eat any sort of
>vegetables, cooked or raw. Nor rice, beans or legumes. She'll eat certain
>types of pasta she can identify, such as macaroni.
>
>We have figured out she won't eat his dressing because it contains onions
>and celery, unless she can't detect it. She has eyes like a microscope,
>tearing everything apart for some small something she doesn't like. She
>certainly won't eat my squash casserole! LOL
>
>The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar. Gee, sorry,
>I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's too bad...
>
>Crackers to go with the cheese? Scott bought a big package of variety
>"entertainment" crackers at Costco. From plain table-water crackers to
>crackers with various seasonings. He said if she spots a speck of
>*anything* in the crackers (like poppy seeds) she'll ask, "What's that
>speck?" and refuse to eat them. Apparently the only thing she'll eat is
>saltines. And we're talking about a 60 year old woman. Oh good lord! I
>thought I was picky!
>
>She asked what she could bring and Scott had to refrain from saying,
>"Something you're willing to eat?!" LOL Well, we aren't catering to her.
>He suggested she bring some rolls. She said she'd get some of those Wonder
>Bread soft dinner rolls from the day old bakery. Scott snapped. He just
>paid them $300 to clean his house - since apparently this is what they do
>for a living. (He couldn't do the cleaning in that huge house while still
>recuperating from surgery.) Scott told me said, "Dammit, at least pick up
>some ****ing Pillsbury crescent rolls or something!"
>
>I had to soothe him and offer to pick up some rolls on the way over. I
>happen to like the sourdough rolls from the Schnuck's bakery and so does he.
>They get nice and crispy on the outside and are nice and moist on the
>inside. Oh, but Audrey probably wouldn't eat those because she has no idea
>what sourdough is. She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it
>is it must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
>WHATEVER.
>
>Looks like she'll just be eating turkey tomorrow.
>
>Jill
>


<rj>
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jmcquown wrote:
>
> >> I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
> >> pretty dull in the sack too....
> >> I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
> >> Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's niece?
> >> Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room together...? LOL
> >>

> >
> > Dave's niece would probably eat her.
> >

> ROFL Yep, probably so!



I don't think so. She would just eat everything up before the other girl
had a chance to reject it.
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Serene wrote:

> >> I'd advise to steer clear of mental cases like her.

> > There's clearly something screwy in her upbringing that has affected
> > this way. I don't think she sees that she has a choice in the matter.
> > It's called a mental illness.

>
> Why would you blame a person's mental illness on her parents?



Why not? That is what a lot of those mentally people do.
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Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:
>
> > Why not? That is what a lot of those mentally people do.

>
> Mental illness is a damned shame. My now deceased friend has a grandchild
> with Schizophrenia. It is ugly. Very ugly and no one is to blame.



It is a damned shame, and you never know when it is going to strike you, a
family member or a friend. It can run a range, from mild down to a serious
and debilitating depression, from zany moments to raving lunacy. It's hard
for the rest of us to deal with because there it can be hard to deal with
rationally. I don't know many people without some form of mental illness
somewhere in the family.
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Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:

> I've often wondered what brings it on. I mean, is it genetics or
> something else? David (the schizophrenic) has complete bouts of sanity.
> Then he just loses it. Never will I forget the time I had to pick him up
> from Lambert here in St. Louis. Sarah, his grandmother, called me panic
> stricken. He just hopped a plane and wound up here in St. Louis. Could I
> help. Well,I was way out of my league but I did the best I could. I wound
> up calling security to *secure* him and then made arrangements to get him
> back to Atlanta. It was a total nightmare and I can only imagine what
> Sarah must have gone through all those years. David's father also does
> the best he can. I dunno... it has got to be hard.


I have a cousin who was eventually diagnosed as manic depressive. My uncle
attributed it to drugs. She got into pot and acid as a teen..... like most
of us. AFAIAC, she was always a little weird. She got a lot weirder as
she got older. They sent her to university for years and were quite
convinced that she was going to be a professor. I don't think she ever
made it through first year, just kept dropping out in time to leave in good
standing and then going back the next year to try it again.

My wife as a cousin who had her ups and downs. She had a set of twins and
then a double whammy post partum depression. They put her on anti-
depressants , which caused her to gain a lot of wait, so she started taking
amphetamines to curb her appetite and give her more energy. Her self
medication just about killed her and she became worse than ever. FWIW....
her father was also slightly manic depressive and got involved in a study
on bi polar and heredity. At her parent's 50th anniversary, and after a
lot of counselling, she claimed to have found lost memories of her father
molesting here. Her sisters never had that problem, or suspected him. My
wife, her sister and another cousin used to spend a lot of time with them.
The uncle used to visit them when they were out of town and he was there on
business. He would take them out for dinner and be a perfect gentleman.
They just can't imagine that he would have done it.

I know, I know..... the dirty molesters single out one victim. I don't put
a lot of faith in that. I attribute it more to therapists planting ideas in
their patients' heads. IMO, the therapist did her a major disservice by
planting that idea in her head and then compounded it by urging her to
contact her family and friends and tell them that her father had molested
her. What an asinine approach. Maybe the plan was to suggest that the old
man was a pervert pedophile who preyed on little girls and they would all
suddenly remember that he had done it to them too, maybe go to the police
and press charges. In the end, it just turned into a big source of
embarrassment for her because no one believed her.


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On Nov 22, 7:06 pm, Dave Smith > wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>
> > >> I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
> > >> pretty dull in the sack too....
> > >> I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
> > >> Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's niece?
> > >> Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room together...? LOL

>
> > > Dave's niece would probably eat her.

>
> > ROFL Yep, probably so!

>
> I don't think so. She would just eat everything up before the other girl
> had a chance to reject it.


I know a funny thing that you could do. Fill some tidbitty items with
Pure Cap*, and put them in the back of the fridge. When she roots
them out and pops one into her mouth, the fun begins. She'll never
raid your fridge again.
My Pure Cap has gotten old, and needs to be replaced. Now it's only
fit to be used for pepper mace.

* http://www.chilliworld.com/SP6.asp?p_id=145
It says, "It can NOT be directly consumed without harm to humans."
Loco B., Jojo B. and myself have all taken half dropperfuls w/o
permanent *physical* damage. In retrospect, you'd better not do that
to your niece. It could kill her.

--Bryan
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On Nov 22, 8:26 pm, Dave Smith > wrote:
> Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:
> > I've often wondered what brings it on. I mean, is it genetics or
> > something else? David (the schizophrenic) has complete bouts of sanity.
> > Then he just loses it. Never will I forget the time I had to pick him up
> > from Lambert here in St. Louis. Sarah, his grandmother, called me panic
> > stricken. He just hopped a plane and wound up here in St. Louis. Could I
> > help. Well,I was way out of my league but I did the best I could. I wound
> > up calling security to *secure* him and then made arrangements to get him
> > back to Atlanta. It was a total nightmare and I can only imagine what
> > Sarah must have gone through all those years. David's father also does
> > the best he can. I dunno... it has got to be hard.

>
> I have a cousin who was eventually diagnosed as manic depressive. My uncle
> attributed it to drugs. She got into pot and acid as a teen..... like most
> of us. AFAIAC, she was always a little weird. She got a lot weirder as
> she got older. They sent her to university for years and were quite
> convinced that she was going to be a professor. I don't think she ever
> made it through first year, just kept dropping out in time to leave in good
> standing and then going back the next year to try it again.
>
> My wife as a cousin who had her ups and downs. She had a set of twins and
> then a double whammy post partum depression. They put her on anti-
> depressants , which caused her to gain a lot of wait, so she started taking
> amphetamines to curb her appetite and give her more energy. Her self
> medication just about killed her and she became worse than ever. FWIW....
> her father was also slightly manic depressive and got involved in a study
> on bi polar and heredity. At her parent's 50th anniversary, and after a
> lot of counselling, she claimed to have found lost memories of her father
> molesting here. Her sisters never had that problem, or suspected him. My
> wife, her sister and another cousin used to spend a lot of time with them.
> The uncle used to visit them when they were out of town and he was there on
> business. He would take them out for dinner and be a perfect gentleman.
> They just can't imagine that he would have done it.
>
> I know, I know..... the dirty molesters single out one victim. I don't put
> a lot of faith in that.


Really. Usually sexual victimizers who get away with it are
emboldened to pursue other easy targets.

> I attribute it more to therapists planting ideas in
> their patients' heads.


Those type of therapists are as bad as the cads who selfishly exploit
the vulnerable.

> IMO, the therapist did her a major disservice by
> planting that idea in her head and then compounded it by urging her to
> contact her family and friends and tell them that her father had molested
> her. What an asinine approach. Maybe the plan was to suggest that the old
> man was a pervert pedophile who preyed on little girls and they would all
> suddenly remember that he had done it to them too, maybe go to the police
> and press charges. In the end, it just turned into a big source of
> embarrassment for her because no one believed her.


And then it was almost as bad as if he'd had done those things, since
she now believed that he had, plus all the added trauma from no one
taking her side. If you want to hurt someone really badly, convince
them that one of their parents whom they thought loved them, never
really did.

--Bryan
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Amarantha wrote:
>
> Or it could be neurobiological. Disorders on the autism spectrum, for
> example, can cause severe food aversions in some.



Interesting. Tell me more. Do autism disorders ever cause slight food
aversions? Does it work in reverse? I'm thinking of adults I know who,
while not as extreme as the woman Jill described, are pretty picky.
Would it make sense to suspect an autism disorder in them?


--Lia

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In article >,
Julia Altshuler > wrote:

> Amarantha wrote:
> >
> > Or it could be neurobiological. Disorders on the autism spectrum, for
> > example, can cause severe food aversions in some.

>
>
> Interesting. Tell me more. Do autism disorders ever cause slight food
> aversions? Does it work in reverse? I'm thinking of adults I know who,
> while not as extreme as the woman Jill described, are pretty picky.
> Would it make sense to suspect an autism disorder in them?


Not by itself, no. If there are other strong indicators of autism, it
might make sense to get it checked out.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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On Nov 22, 9:50 pm, "Michael \"Dog3\"" > wrote:
> "Bobo Bonobo(R)" > dropped :
> in rec.food.cooking
>
>
>
> > On Nov 22, 7:06 pm, Dave Smith > wrote:
> >> jmcquown wrote:

>
> >> > >> I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are
> >> > >> probably pretty dull in the sack too....
> >> > >> I agree- What a bore she must be <sigh>
> >> > >> Do let us hear how it went. I wonder if she knows Dave Smith's
> >> > >> niece? Can you imagine the two of them locked in a room
> >> > >> together...? LOL

>
> >> > > Dave's niece would probably eat her.

>
> >> > ROFL Yep, probably so!

>
> >> I don't think so. She would just eat everything up before the other
> >> girl had a chance to reject it.

>
> > I know a funny thing that you could do. Fill some tidbitty items with
> > Pure Cap*, and put them in the back of the fridge. When she roots
> > them out and pops one into her mouth, the fun begins. She'll never
> > raid your fridge again.
> > My Pure Cap has gotten old, and needs to be replaced. Now it's only
> > fit to be used for pepper mace.

>
> > *http://www.chilliworld.com/SP6.asp?p_id=145
> > It says, "It can NOT be directly consumed without harm to humans."
> > Loco B., Jojo B. and myself have all taken half dropperfuls w/o
> > permanent *physical* damage. In retrospect, you'd better not do that
> > to your niece. It could kill her.

>
> > --Bryan

>
> Is that Dave's niece that eats... well... everything? I remember a story
> or 2 about her. I feel badly for her. Can you even imagine eating...
> constantly... all of the time?


It's an illness that I can imagine. I've flirted with it, though
never gone whole hog. She should do Atkins. It might change her
life. You empathize. Unfortunately, I can kind of relate.
>
> Michael
>

--Bryan


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On Nov 22, 10:40 pm, Miche > wrote:
> In article >,
>
>
> Miche
>
> --
> Electricians do it in three phases


If I asked you to elaborate, that would be off topic for this NG,
wouldn't it?

--Bryan

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In article
>,
"Bobo Bonobo(R)" > wrote:

> On Nov 22, 10:40 pm, Miche > wrote:
> > In article >,
> >
> >
> > Miche
> >
> > --
> > Electricians do it in three phases

>
> If I asked you to elaborate, that would be off topic for this NG,
> wouldn't it?


Yes, yes it would.

Miche

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Dave Smith wrote:
> ravenlynne wrote:
>>
>> Screw her, I say.

>
> She probably wouldn't like that either :-)
>
>
>> Serve what you serve, and if she complains, too
>> freaking bad.

>
>
> I agree. You can't win with picky people. If someone needs to
> accommodate it should be the guest. Since other people are bringing
> things, she can bring something she likes.


Okay, at what point in my original post did everyone miss the fact that we
weren't "accomodating" her? She actually managed to get a very nice plate
of food for herself, what with green beans (surprise! she actually eats
green beans!), dark meat turkey and a roll.


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jmcquown wrote:
>
> Okay, at what point in my original post did everyone miss the fact that we
> weren't "accomodating" her? She actually managed to get a very nice plate
> of food for herself, what with green beans (surprise! she actually eats
> green beans!), dark meat turkey and a roll.



Green beans. So she does eat vegetables.


People are divided on this one so you'll be in trouble either way. If
you buy 3 sorts of cheese and she'll eat none of them, you're in trouble
for not being kind to a guest. If you tell her she's welcome to bring
whatever sorts of rolls she likes, you're in trouble for catering to a
picky guest.


I'm still curious about the sex thing. Why don't we ask her?


--Lia



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Julia Altshuler wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>>
>> Okay, at what point in my original post did everyone miss the fact
>> that we weren't "accomodating" her? She actually managed to get a
>> very nice plate of food for herself, what with green beans
>> (surprise! she actually eats green beans!), dark meat turkey and a
>> roll.

>
> Green beans. So she does eat vegetables.


I was going by what my brother Scott told me.

> People are divided on this one so you'll be in trouble either way. If
> you buy 3 sorts of cheese and she'll eat none of them, you're in
> trouble for not being kind to a guest. If you tell her she's welcome
> to bring whatever sorts of rolls she likes, you're in trouble for
> catering to a picky guest.
>

I was very nice to her. My brother, on the other hand, treated her
horribly. He kept demanding she should surely like to eat mushrooms since
she eats cream of mushroom soup. He kept quizzing her on why she wouldn't
eat some cheese and crackers. Good lord, man, leave her alone!

She was gracious. I'd have punched him in the mouth and walked out. I
wanted to walk out well before dinner. He was so rude and so "superior".
And her sex life has nothing to do with her being a picky eater.


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On Nov 22, 5:16 am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
> Julie Bove wrote:
> > "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...

>
> >> I'm fussy about not liking raw veggies. It's not so much the taste
> >> as it is
> >> a texture thing with me. But I'll eat just about any cooked veggie
> >> there is. Guess it's a good thing I didn't plan to bring artichoke
> >> hearts... oh wait, I have a jar of them I could take with me

>
> > I'm just the opposite. I'll eat pretty much anything raw but
> > potatoes.

>
> Yeah, but raw potatoes are gross. Cooked potatoes are a joy


I always eat a chunk of raw potato when I'm prepping them. Granted, I
wouldn't want to eat only raw potato, but it's not gross. At least,
not to me.

Cindy Hamilton
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jmcquown wrote:

> I was very nice to her. My brother, on the other hand, treated her
> horribly. He kept demanding she should surely like to eat mushrooms since
> she eats cream of mushroom soup. He kept quizzing her on why she wouldn't
> eat some cheese and crackers. Good lord, man, leave her alone!
>
> She was gracious. I'd have punched him in the mouth and walked out. I
> wanted to walk out well before dinner. He was so rude and so "superior".
> And her sex life has nothing to do with her being a picky eater.
>

In my family (no hesitation here!) we'd have said directly to him "Hey
Joe.. lay off..you're annoying the hell out of EVERYONE here!"
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

>> Yeah, but raw potatoes are gross. Cooked potatoes are a joy

>
> I always eat a chunk of raw potato when I'm prepping them. Granted, I
> wouldn't want to eat only raw potato, but it's not gross. At least,
> not to me.
>
> Cindy Hamilton


Nope.. me neither. As my mother would prep the potatoes kids were known
to walk by a grab one (as they would with anything she was cutting up)
and eat it and she shooed us out of her way. Nothing great about raw
potatoes, but nothing gross either.
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In article >,
Dave Smith > wrote:

> wrote:
>
>
> > A little passive aggressive, wouldn't you say, Jill? Would it have
> > killed you to buy just one thing this woman will eat?
> > Picky or not, it's quite obvious you have no respect for your brother
> > or his companion.
> > it's clear to me who the bitch in this scenario is. And it's not the
> > picky eater.

>
>
> Poppycock. Consider the alternatives. They could forgo all the things they
> like for the sake of someone who picky and then everyone else suffers, or
> they could have a confrontation over it.
>
> I know what it is like.


I'm not sure I do. I'm a very picky eater myself. I have never starved
to death. It's very seldom that I can't find enough food at somebody's
place. I never whine, unless people try to convince me to eat things
that I don't want. My daughter was a vegetarian for eight years, and a
vegan for a short while. No whining. There was always food, she just
didn't choose the ones with meat. My sister was a vegetarian for 13
years. When we went to somebody's house, she would just ask in advance,
and often volunteer to bring a vegetarian dish. Lots of people who eat
meat, also like vegetarian dishes. I often do.

If I don't like something, I just don't eat it. If somebody else
doesn't like something, I expect the same consideration.


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In article >,
Dave Smith > wrote:


> I agree. I think the worst situation I ever ran into was a great niece who
> showed up at Boxing Day family Christmas gathering. I didn't know she was
> around. I didn't know that she was a vegan. Her father had planned to bring
> some vegan food with him but he forgot it at home. Plus they showed up at
> the last minute, so my wife was running around trying to find something
> that she could eat and she had to read all the ingredients. A year and a
> half later she was sitting across from me in a restaurant with a breakfast
> buffet and I was naturally curious about what she had found to eat at the
> buffet tables....... bacon, ham, roast beef.....
>
> And that is one of the major reasons I refuse to cater to fad diets.



I've heard that doctors seldom worry about vitamin B12 deficiencies in
young vegetarians. This could be a serious problem, but the body
usually has a three year supply stored up. After a couple of years, the
doctor asks. They are seldom still vegetarians. I was concerned about
my daughter, since she was a young vegetarian for 8 years. She had
already checked it out and taken care of it.
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"Mark Thorson" > wrote in message
...
> jmcquown wrote:
>>
>> She's one of those people, if she doesn't know what it is it
>> must be terrible. If anyone mentioned sourdough she'd freak.
>> WHATEVER.

>
> I'd advise to steer clear of mental cases like her.


It sounds like she and Jill deserve each other.


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On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 13:46:43 -0500, Goomba38 >
wrote:

>jmcquown wrote:
>
>> This woman doesn't even like "specks" of stuff in her crackers. You can
>> pretty much rule out sharp anything. How boring it must be! I gather she
>> likes Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tomato soup. It doesn't have
>> "stuff" in it. Little does she know... LOL

>
>I have this hunch that people who are so dull about food are probably
>pretty dull in the sack too....


you never know, maybe she saves all her inventiveness for sex. her
bedroom might be chock-full of equipment.

your pal,
blake
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"blake murphy" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 09:49:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
> > wrote:
>
wrote:
>>> On Nov 22, 12:22 am, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>>
>>>> The only cheese she will eat is cheddar but ONLY mild cheddar.
>>>> Gee, sorry, I bought sharp cheddar, pepper-jack and colby. That's
>>>> too bad...
>>>>
>>>
>>> A little passive aggressive, wouldn't you say, Jill? Would it have
>>> killed you to buy just one thing this woman will eat?

>>
>>How can I possibly know what she will eat? I did my shopping based on
>>what
>>my brothers and I like. I'm not catering to this woman; there's no reason
>>anyone should. She can bring her own damn food if she's going to be so
>>picky about everything.
>>
>>> Picky or not, it's quite obvious you have no respect for your brother
>>> or his companion.

>>
>>You've got that right. Given the choice this brother and his companion
>>wouldn't be there at all. I'll send them over to your place and let you
>>deal with them!
>>

>
> if i had to bet, i'd bet she won't complain half as much as you have
> already.
>


BINGO!!!!!












> your pal,
> blake



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On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 08:25:48 +1300, Miche >
wrote:

>In article >,
> Dave Smith > wrote:
>
>> jmcquown wrote:

>
>> > As I said in my original post, I have no problem trying to accomodate food
>> > allergies or health conditions. But just plain being picky? Nope. Deal
>> > with your food issues yourself; don't expect me to do it for you.

>>
>> There is picky and their is pure childishness. There is no way I am going
>> to dumb down a dinner for a picky person. A traditional Thanksgiving dinner
>> around here is roast turkey with stuffing, gravy, mashed potatoes, squash,
>> beans, corn, salad, rolls, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and/or apple pie,
>> fruit and cheese plate. If someone can't find something to eat out of all
>> that they should plan on stopping at McDonalds on the way there or the way
>> back.

>
>There's "bits" in McDonald's.
>
>Miche


tiny bits of beef, yes.

your pal,
blake
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