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Old 28-08-2007, 01:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

When I was a kid, 40some years ago, I remember that the potatoes we bought
were pretty dirty. Always had to scrub them with a brush before fixing them
to eat. But in more recently years, I've noticed that most all of the
potatoes I've gotten have been so clean that they only seem to need a quick
rinse in the sink. Only have to pull out the brush every once in a while.
Until tonight.

I get a box of organic produce weekly from a local farm. Most of the time
even their potatoes are pretty clean. But the paper bag of baby reds I put
in tonight's soup were so dirty I had a hard time getting them clean. They
were just encased in thick dirt that turned to mud and splattered my shirt
as I tried to clean them. And I scrubbed them so much to get the mud off
that most of the peel came along with it.

Now I realize the growers or vendors or someone along the food chain is
probably using some method of cleaning that I'd most likely not want to know
the particulars of. Or maybe I would... But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!



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Old 28-08-2007, 02:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

On Aug 27, 6:50 pm, "Julie Bove" wrote:
When I was a kid, 40some years ago, I remember that the potatoes we bought
were pretty dirty. Always had to scrub them with a brush before fixing them
to eat. But in more recently years, I've noticed that most all of the
potatoes I've gotten have been so clean that they only seem to need a quick
rinse in the sink. Only have to pull out the brush every once in a while.
Until tonight.

I get a box of organic produce weekly from a local farm. Most of the time
even their potatoes are pretty clean. But the paper bag of baby reds I put
in tonight's soup were so dirty I had a hard time getting them clean. They
were just encased in thick dirt that turned to mud and splattered my shirt
as I tried to clean them. And I scrubbed them so much to get the mud off
that most of the peel came along with it.

Now I realize the growers or vendors or someone along the food chain is
probably using some method of cleaning that I'd most likely not want to know
the particulars of. Or maybe I would... But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!


You're complaining a bit, but wasn't it worth it? I've never bought
potatoes that were that dirty, but I've dug them in my garden and had
to wash them. After your hard work, were you pleased with the taste?

--Bryan

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Old 28-08-2007, 02:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!

Julie, I just posted 3 pictures of the produce at our farmer's market. One
I did not post was one of potatoes, which I had bought previously. When I
asked her if she ever washed the potatoes, I could tell by her reaction that
she thought I had wished she had washed them; she replied that it was
better not to wash them.

I hope I explained to her that I was thankful that she had not washed them.
I bought them the previous time to last Saturday. They were delicious.
I'll miss the produce this winter, I'm going to have to ask them how long
they'll be there. But there are orchards -- of course with limited foods.
Dee Dee


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Old 28-08-2007, 02:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Bobo Bonobo®" wrote in message
ups.com...

You're complaining a bit, but wasn't it worth it? I've never bought
potatoes that were that dirty, but I've dug them in my garden and had
to wash them. After your hard work, were you pleased with the taste?


The soup is very good. I do grow some of my own veggies, but potatoes
aren't one of them. I grow in containers. I just found it odd that these
potatoes were so very caked in dirt when I've been getting really clean ones
for years.


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Old 28-08-2007, 02:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
...

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!

Julie, I just posted 3 pictures of the produce at our farmer's market.
One I did not post was one of potatoes, which I had bought previously.
When I asked her if she ever washed the potatoes, I could tell by her
reaction that she thought I had wished she had washed them; she replied
that it was better not to wash them.

I hope I explained to her that I was thankful that she had not washed
them. I bought them the previous time to last Saturday. They were
delicious.
I'll miss the produce this winter, I'm going to have to ask them how long
they'll be there. But there are orchards -- of course with limited foods.


Yes, I realize it is best not to wash them. However I think most growers
make some attempt to remove at least some of the dirt before selling. These
could have been brushed off by hand or something. I was paying by the pound
so I was paying for that dirt along with the potatoes.




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Old 28-08-2007, 03:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

"Julie Bove" wrote:
When I was a kid, 40some years ago, I remember that the potatoes we bought
were pretty dirty. Always had to scrub them with a brush before fixing them
to eat. But in more recently years, I've noticed that most all of the
potatoes I've gotten have been so clean that they only seem to need a quick
rinse in the sink. Only have to pull out the brush every once in a while.
Until tonight.

I get a box of organic produce weekly from a local farm. Most of the time
even their potatoes are pretty clean. But the paper bag of baby reds I put
in tonight's soup were so dirty I had a hard time getting them clean. They
were just encased in thick dirt that turned to mud and splattered my shirt
as I tried to clean them. And I scrubbed them so much to get the mud off
that most of the peel came along with it.

Now I realize the growers or vendors or someone along the food chain is
probably using some method of cleaning that I'd most likely not want to know
the particulars of. Or maybe I would... But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!


With modern harvesting methods potatoes are washed clean right out of
the ground, before the dirt can dry and harden. Your dirt encrusted
organic spuds were very likely grown on a small family farm that can't
afford the very expensive modern harvesting equipment. Bet you didn't
know that a giant tractor can cost a million dollars and more. Had
you soaked those dirty potatoes in a bucket of water for an hour the
dirt would soften, loosen, and most settle to the bottom so you
wouldn't need to scrub hardly at all.

http://www.dole5aday.com/ReferenceCe...tato_grown.jsp

With the large farming co-ops the harvesters are private enterprises
that are contracted to go farm to farm... working that equipment
constantly is the only way it becomes affordable... fitted with
special lighting bars they actually work all through the night.
Nowadays the large tractors are operated with fancy schmancy GPS
systems, there is no overlap, no wasted space on each run... those
behemoth tractors make five mile passes not wavering a tenth of an
inch... they don't really need a driver, often there is none,
everything fully on cruise control. My tractor has cruise control but
not GPS... when the grass is tall I set it to creep speed and just
steer through each long pass by lining up to a tree on the horizon,
pretty mindless. If I move too fast the mower doesn't have enough
time to mulch and makes clumps so creep speed is nice, but without the
cruise control it's difficult to make straight passes at 1 mph, can't
hold my foot on the throttle steadly so long either. I never use the
cruise control on my car but I like it on my tractor, I can make some
pretty straight rows.

Just last week, heading out to mow my back field:

http://i9.tinypic.com/4ul2arm.jpg

http://i10.tinypic.com/4lg4mzs.jpg

http://i16.tinypic.com/67s6quf.jpg

http://i19.tinypic.com/6g3qlvr.jpg

http://i12.tinypic.com/66xodud.jpg

http://i12.tinypic.com/4mal0mv.jpg

Was hot as hell that day, but AC makes it lovely.


Sheldon


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Old 28-08-2007, 03:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

"Julie Bove" wrote:
"Dee Dee" wrote:
"Julie Bove" wrote:
But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!

Julie, I just posted 3 pictures of the produce at our farmer's market.
One I did not post was one of potatoes, which I had bought previously.
When I asked her if she ever washed the potatoes, I could tell by her
reaction that she thought I had wished she had washed them; she replied
that it was better not to wash them.


I hope I explained to her that I was thankful that she had not washed
them. I bought them the previous time to last Saturday. They were
delicious.
I'll miss the produce this winter, I'm going to have to ask them how long
they'll be there. But there are orchards -- of course with limited foods.


Yes, I realize it is best not to wash them.


That's nonsense. The farmer's market seller either lied or is
ignorant. Potatoes grow underground, they're wet all the time. All
the big potato growers wash their potatoes right in the field as soon
as they're dug, they need to be clean to receive a USDA grade.
Whoever was selling dirt encrusted potatoes was either too lazy to
clean the spuds when harvested or enjoyed a bigger profit selling
dirt.

Sheldon

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Old 28-08-2007, 03:45 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

Steve Wertz wrote:
Sheldon wrote:
Just last week, heading out to mow my back field:


That was pretty boring.


Maybe it is, but it's better than doing nothing.

Obviously what's most boring of all is your entire soulless life...
why do you bother to wake up each day... you don't ever do anything,
you don't earn the air you breathe. Those of us who are constructive
at something, anything, can put that air you waste to better use. How
about we make a bargain, you stop breathing and I'll do things that
are more interesting.




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Old 28-08-2007, 04:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 00:50:42 GMT, Julie Bove wrote:

Now I realize the growers or vendors or someone along the food chain is
probably using some method of cleaning that I'd most likely not want to
know
the particulars of. Or maybe I would...


The dirt they grow in has been treated with Teflon.


Eeeeeeeew. But hey, there's a thought!


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Old 28-08-2007, 04:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Sheldon" wrote in message
ups.com...

That's nonsense. The farmer's market seller either lied or is
ignorant. Potatoes grow underground, they're wet all the time. All
the big potato growers wash their potatoes right in the field as soon
as they're dug, they need to be clean to receive a USDA grade.
Whoever was selling dirt encrusted potatoes was either too lazy to
clean the spuds when harvested or enjoyed a bigger profit selling
dirt.


Interesting. I didn't know that they were supposed to be cleaned to get the
USDA grade.




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Old 28-08-2007, 04:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

With modern harvesting methods potatoes are washed clean right out of
the ground, before the dirt can dry and harden. Your dirt encrusted
organic spuds were very likely grown on a small family farm that can't
afford the very expensive modern harvesting equipment. Bet you didn't
know that a giant tractor can cost a million dollars and more. Had
you soaked those dirty potatoes in a bucket of water for an hour the
dirt would soften, loosen, and most settle to the bottom so you
wouldn't need to scrub hardly at all.


Yes, they come from a local farm. But normally their potatoes aren't dirty.
At least not THAT dirty. I get a box of assorted stuff each week from them.

Had I known ahead of time they were that dirty, I would have soaked them.
But stupid me. They were the last thing I added to the soup and daughter
was screaming that she was hungry. No time for soaking.

http://www.dole5aday.com/ReferenceCe...tato_grown.jsp

With the large farming co-ops the harvesters are private enterprises
that are contracted to go farm to farm... working that equipment
constantly is the only way it becomes affordable... fitted with
special lighting bars they actually work all through the night.
Nowadays the large tractors are operated with fancy schmancy GPS
systems, there is no overlap, no wasted space on each run... those
behemoth tractors make five mile passes not wavering a tenth of an
inch... they don't really need a driver, often there is none,
everything fully on cruise control. My tractor has cruise control but
not GPS... when the grass is tall I set it to creep speed and just
steer through each long pass by lining up to a tree on the horizon,
pretty mindless. If I move too fast the mower doesn't have enough
time to mulch and makes clumps so creep speed is nice, but without the
cruise control it's difficult to make straight passes at 1 mph, can't
hold my foot on the throttle steadly so long either. I never use the
cruise control on my car but I like it on my tractor, I can make some
pretty straight rows.


Interesting. I grew up with farmers on both sides of the family but I was
always cautioned that there were certain things it was best not to grow and
potatoes were one of them. Why? You could buy them cheaply and it wasn't
worth the effort. I know my grandpa planted them some years though because
my mom told me about growing them. And I'm pretty sure we grew them at
least once when I was a kid.

Just last week, heading out to mow my back field:

http://i9.tinypic.com/4ul2arm.jpg

http://i10.tinypic.com/4lg4mzs.jpg

http://i16.tinypic.com/67s6quf.jpg

http://i19.tinypic.com/6g3qlvr.jpg

http://i12.tinypic.com/66xodud.jpg

http://i12.tinypic.com/4mal0mv.jpg

Was hot as hell that day, but AC makes it lovely.


I wish I had AC, but we don't need it too much here in WA.


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Old 28-08-2007, 09:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

In article [email protected],
"Julie Bove" wrote:

When I was a kid, 40some years ago, I remember that the potatoes we bought
were pretty dirty. Always had to scrub them with a brush before fixing them
to eat. But in more recently years, I've noticed that most all of the
potatoes I've gotten have been so clean that they only seem to need a quick
rinse in the sink. Only have to pull out the brush every once in a while.
Until tonight.

I get a box of organic produce weekly from a local farm. Most of the time
even their potatoes are pretty clean. But the paper bag of baby reds I put
in tonight's soup were so dirty I had a hard time getting them clean. They
were just encased in thick dirt that turned to mud and splattered my shirt
as I tried to clean them. And I scrubbed them so much to get the mud off
that most of the peel came along with it.

Now I realize the growers or vendors or someone along the food chain is
probably using some method of cleaning that I'd most likely not want to know
the particulars of. Or maybe I would... But my question is: When was the
last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course you grow
them yourself!


Been so long, I can't remember.
Same for Carrots.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 28-08-2007, 10:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes


"Omelet" wrote in message
news
Been so long, I can't remember.
Same for Carrots.


Not sure I remember dirty carrots. I wonder though... Why are they
sometimes sold with the tops on? Generally the ones I get in my produce box
have them on. I assumed they would keep fresher with the tops on. But I
read somewhere it is best to remove them. So I've been doing that and
indeed the carrots stay fresher. Sometimes they do have annoying hairy
roots on them though.


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Old 28-08-2007, 10:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

In article [email protected],
"Julie Bove" wrote:

"Omelet" wrote in message
news
Been so long, I can't remember.
Same for Carrots.


Not sure I remember dirty carrots. I wonder though... Why are they
sometimes sold with the tops on? Generally the ones I get in my produce box
have them on. I assumed they would keep fresher with the tops on. But I
read somewhere it is best to remove them. So I've been doing that and
indeed the carrots stay fresher. Sometimes they do have annoying hairy
roots on them though.


I wish I could find them with the tops on.
Carrot tops would be very good for my cockatoo.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 28-08-2007, 11:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dirty potatoes

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
When I was a kid, 40some years ago, I remember that the potatoes we bought
were pretty dirty. Always had to scrub them with a brush before fixing
them to eat. But in more recently years, I've noticed that most all of
the potatoes I've gotten have been so clean that they only seem to need a
quick rinse in the sink. Only have to pull out the brush every once in a
while. Until tonight.

I get a box of organic produce weekly from a local farm. Most of the time
even their potatoes are pretty clean. But the paper bag of baby reds I
put in tonight's soup were so dirty I had a hard time getting them clean.
They were just encased in thick dirt that turned to mud and splattered my
shirt as I tried to clean them. And I scrubbed them so much to get the
mud off that most of the peel came along with it.

Now I realize the growers or vendors or someone along the food chain is
probably using some method of cleaning that I'd most likely not want to
know the particulars of. Or maybe I would... But my question is: When
was the last time you got some really dirty potatoes? Unless of course
you grow them yourself!


Oh well. It was probably harder for the farmer to harvest them than it was
for you to clean them. Hush. Enjoy.




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