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Default Bradley smokers?

Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html
--

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"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html
> --
>
> modom


Ask on alt.food.barbecue There has been some good and bad about them. You
have to buy their smoking discs instead of regular wood chips. Some liked
them but a couple in hot regions (ambient 115 degrees) did not like the
taste from them, probably because it did not burn hot enough to burn off the
creosote.

I just got one of these
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=3342508
Good deal for the price. Did briskets and a pork picnic today. Only used it
three times so far, but results are very good.


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modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html


As someone who has used virtually every bbq pit out there, including
commercial pits, I honestly don't like the Bradely. A number of folks who
have used them have ended up selling them.

You are stuck with their proprietary 'biscuits' as fuel. The biscuits are
expensive, and have been the source of numerous problems. They must be
carefully stored. If they swell due to humidity, or if the have sawdust or
chips stuck to them, etc. they can get stuck in the feeder. They are sold
as a 'set and forget' machine, but they only hold eight hours worth of
biscuits; not sufficient for the typical sized pork butt or briskets.

I also find that they tend not to be as consistent as one would think it
would be about the bbq it produces. If not monitored closely, sometimes the
smoke flavoring is non-existent, at other times it can be overpowering. It
needs to be watched in order to get it to perform its best, which takes away
from one of the major selling points.

As with any device, there are fanatic Bradely proponents. They are
enthusiastic about the machine.

But for me, the Bradely is too gimicky for my taste. It is too expensive to
run compared to a WSM, and it really isn't much more convenient. It is too
prone to potential problems and inconsistent cooking to make me feel
comfortable about leaving it alone during cooking.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Default Bradley smokers?

On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 21:36:27 -0500, "modom (palindrome guy)"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
>http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html
>--
>
>modom

I had wondered about those as well..

On eGullet, there is a long running thread about cooking from the
Charcuterie book, and Michael Ruhlman is a contributer to that thread
on occasion. Several folks on that thread have gotten Bradley
smokers... Maybe you could ask there?

I know they can do cold smoking as well...

Christine
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"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html
> --
>
> modom
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>


I have a similar style thought not a Bradley that has worked great now for
two years. Mine is like this on
http://www.amazon.com/SMOKE-HOLLOW-S...641584&sr=1-44
that I purchased locally on sale for $90.

Joe




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In article >,
[email protected] says...
> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html
> --
>
> modom
>
>

If you're interested in an electric smoker that you can pretty much set
and forget, check out the Cookshack products. They're more durable and
efficient than the Bradleys, and they don't require the proprietary
pucks to produce smoke.

Bob
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I have a Bradley smoker, its great.
The pucks can be expensive if bought at a local camping/hunting
store but large discounts can be had by online stores.

The big advantage with the Bradley is that it uses very little
heat to produce the smoke so cold smoking of cheese etc is
possible.

Smoked old cheddar is magnificent.

The Bradley forums are also a source of good recipes.

If you like cold smoked products as well as hot smoked then
Bradley is the way to go. Lox salmon is great with this smoker.

If you can get the non digital smoker which is the slightly
older model you have more options to customising the smoking
process.

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what creosote?
There is no creosote in a Bradley puck, they use an edible binding
gelatine to form the pucks.

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Phil Evans wrote:
> what creosote?
> There is no creosote in a Bradley puck, they use an edible binding
> gelatine to form the pucks.


Who, or what are you referring to? It helps to include the part of the text
that you are responding to.

Creosote is not an ingredient, it is a byproduct of incomplete wood or wood
product combustion. From my experience Bradely smokers can, and have,
produced creosote.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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yetanotherBob wrote:

> If you're interested in an electric smoker that you can pretty much
> set and forget, check out the Cookshack products. They're more
> durable and efficient than the Bradleys, and they don't require the
> proprietary pucks to produce smoke.


I agree with Bob on this. You can use your own wood or lump charcoal. And a
little goes a long way.
http://www.cookshack.com/

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com




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On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 09:20:43 -0400, "Joe Cilinceon" >
wrote:

>"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
.. .
>> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
>> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html

>
>I have a similar style thought not a Bradley that has worked great now for
>two years. Mine is like this on
>http://www.amazon.com/SMOKE-HOLLOW-S...641584&sr=1-44
>that I purchased locally on sale for $90.
>
>Joe
>

Thanks for the tip, Joe. Is it possible to cold smoke in this unit? I
want to cold smoke a few things when the weather cools down.
--

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On Thu, 05 Jul 2007 02:59:58 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" >
wrote:
>
>Ask on alt.food.barbecue There has been some good and bad about them. You
>have to buy their smoking discs instead of regular wood chips. Some liked
>them but a couple in hot regions (ambient 115 degrees) did not like the
>taste from them, probably because it did not burn hot enough to burn off the
>creosote.
>
>I just got one of these
>http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=3342508
>Good deal for the price. Did briskets and a pork picnic today. Only used it
>three times so far, but results are very good.
>


Thanks, Ed. Can you cold smoke in this unit? Or do you have to get
an electric smoker for that?
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On Wed, 4 Jul 2007 20:13:54 -0700, "Dave Bugg" >
wrote:

>modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
>> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
>> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html

>
>As someone who has used virtually every bbq pit out there, including
>commercial pits, I honestly don't like the Bradely. A number of folks who
>have used them have ended up selling them.
>
>You are stuck with their proprietary 'biscuits' as fuel. The biscuits are
>expensive, and have been the source of numerous problems. They must be
>carefully stored. If they swell due to humidity, or if the have sawdust or
>chips stuck to them, etc. they can get stuck in the feeder. They are sold
>as a 'set and forget' machine, but they only hold eight hours worth of
>biscuits; not sufficient for the typical sized pork butt or briskets.
>
>I also find that they tend not to be as consistent as one would think it
>would be about the bbq it produces. If not monitored closely, sometimes the
>smoke flavoring is non-existent, at other times it can be overpowering. It
>needs to be watched in order to get it to perform its best, which takes away
>from one of the major selling points.
>
>As with any device, there are fanatic Bradely proponents. They are
>enthusiastic about the machine.
>
>But for me, the Bradely is too gimicky for my taste. It is too expensive to
>run compared to a WSM, and it really isn't much more convenient. It is too
>prone to potential problems and inconsistent cooking to make me feel
>comfortable about leaving it alone during cooking.


I appreciate your advice, Dave. It's obvious you know a lot about the
subject. Thanks.
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"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 09:20:43 -0400, "Joe Cilinceon" >
> wrote:
>
>>"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
. ..
>>> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
>>> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html

>>
>>I have a similar style thought not a Bradley that has worked great now for
>>two years. Mine is like this on
>>http://www.amazon.com/SMOKE-HOLLOW-S...641584&sr=1-44
>>that I purchased locally on sale for $90.
>>
>>Joe
>>

> Thanks for the tip, Joe. Is it possible to cold smoke in this unit? I
> want to cold smoke a few things when the weather cools down.
> --
>
> modom
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>


No, I don't think it will do cold smoking at least what I think cold smoking
is. I could be wrong in what I think cold smoking is, but assume you need to
burn the wood making the smoke and stop the heat so it doesn't cook the food
at all. This particular smoker works best between about 190 to 300 degrees.
I tend to like to do most things at about 210 to 230 which is easy to set
and hold steady. It will burn any wood out there that are in chip form even
if you bust it up. It will also work with charcoal and even the pellet type
wood chips. You can't use the gas however while using charcoal but with wood
chips gas is the way to go with this smoker.


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modom (palindrome guy) wrote:

> I appreciate your advice, Dave. It's obvious you know a lot about the
> subject. Thanks.


You're welcome. Let me know if there are any questions I can help with.
--
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www.davebbq.com




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On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 15:14:25 -0700, "Dave Bugg" >
wrote:

>modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
>
>> I appreciate your advice, Dave. It's obvious you know a lot about the
>> subject. Thanks.

>
>You're welcome. Let me know if there are any questions I can help with.


Did you see my query about cold smoking? Is there a gas smoker out
there you can cold smoke with?
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modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
> On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 15:14:25 -0700, "Dave Bugg" >
> wrote:
>
>> modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
>>
>>> I appreciate your advice, Dave. It's obvious you know a lot about
>>> the subject. Thanks.

>>
>> You're welcome. Let me know if there are any questions I can help
>> with.

>
> Did you see my query about cold smoking? Is there a gas smoker out
> there you can cold smoke with?


I am not familiar with any non-commercial smokers. But the Cookshack
electrics can do cold smoking.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>
>>I just got one of these

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=3342508

>
> Thanks, Ed. Can you cold smoke in this unit? Or do you have to get
> an electric smoker for that?


No and yes. The setup as it is gets too hot, but, what I've done with my old
(similar design) smoker is to use a $10 electric hotplate and a pan of
sawdust for the smoke and it worked very well. You can use a hotplate and
a cardboard box too.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


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On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 15:48:44 -0700, "Dave Bugg" >
wrote:

>modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
>>
>> Did you see my query about cold smoking? Is there a gas smoker out
>> there you can cold smoke with?

>
>I am not familiar with any non-commercial smokers. But the Cookshack
>electrics can do cold smoking.


Thanks again, Dave.

I just dropped by the Wal-Mart in the county seat after dinner to look
at the Great Outdoors smoker Ed linked to. The steel is a little
lighter guage than in my old rusty New Braunfels pit, but I think on
the whole it looks like a good design and durable enough. Especially
for the price. I'm wondering if I could get the smoke going with the
door open, drop the flame to almost nothing and stash a bigass pan of
ice in the Great Outdoors unit to keep the temp below 90F to smoke
some (salt cured) salmon?

Those Cookshack smokers are too pricy for a hobbyist meat smoker on my
income. They look like fantastic cookers, but *ouch* -- the cash.
--

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"Phil Evans" > wrote in message
...
> what creosote?
> There is no creosote in a Bradley puck, they use an edible binding
> gelatine to form the pucks.
>


Sure is. As long as there is wood to burn, there is potential for creosote.
Wood smoke has many ingredients.




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modom (palindrome guy) wrote:

> Thanks again, Dave.
>
> I just dropped by the Wal-Mart in the county seat after dinner to look
> at the Great Outdoors smoker Ed linked to. The steel is a little
> lighter guage than in my old rusty New Braunfels pit, but I think on
> the whole it looks like a good design and durable enough. Especially
> for the price. I'm wondering if I could get the smoke going with the
> door open, drop the flame to almost nothing and stash a bigass pan of
> ice in the Great Outdoors unit to keep the temp below 90F to smoke
> some (salt cured) salmon?
>
> Those Cookshack smokers are too pricy for a hobbyist meat smoker on my
> income. They look like fantastic cookers, but *ouch* -- the cash.


I never used the GOS to try cold smoking, so I don't know if the flame can
be dropped that low and still remain lit. BUT, if it didn't work, you could
always buy a cheap electric burner, a cast iron pan, and generate the smoke
that way.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 02:43:50 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" >
wrote:

>
>"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>
>>>I just got one of these

>http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=3342508
>
>>
>> Thanks, Ed. Can you cold smoke in this unit? Or do you have to get
>> an electric smoker for that?

>
>No and yes. The setup as it is gets too hot, but, what I've done with my old
>(similar design) smoker is to use a $10 electric hotplate and a pan of
>sawdust for the smoke and it worked very well. You can use a hotplate and
>a cardboard box too.


I saw that episode of Good Eats. A classic. But with all the rain
around here lately, cardboard wouldn't last more than a hour outside.
Anyhow, I've got a piece of wild caught salmon in a salt cure in the
fridge right now. That gives me a little time to work out a plan for
smoking it this weekend.

Tomorow, I'll pick up one of those Great Outdoors smokers at the
Wal-Mart over in the county seat. I have pastrami to make, too.
--

modom

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You can get a fairly good cold smoke if you can divorce the smoke
generation unit from the smoker unit.

This can be done by running a flexible HVAC duct between the two
parts. The smoke will have residual heat but the heat from the
heating element will not get into the smoker.

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modom (palindrome guy) <[email protected]> wrote:
>Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
>http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html


I'd rather have one of these:

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05239/560812.stm

--Blair
"And a few dozen hogs to go, please..."
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modom (palindrome guy) wrote:

> On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 02:43:50 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message


> >> Thanks, Ed. Can you cold smoke in this unit?


> > No and yes. The setup as it is gets too hot, but, what I've done
> > with my old (similar design) smoker is to use a $10 electric
> > hotplate and a pan of sawdust for the smoke and it worked very
> > well. You can use a hotplate and a cardboard box too.

>
> I saw that episode of Good Eats. A classic.



I'll point out that AB wasn't cold-smoking in that episode, as he
stated in the show. The rig is so small that it's hot-smoking, although
at a relatively low temperature.

<http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season4/Salmon/SalmonTranscript.htm>


He did do true cold-smoking in the "Scrap Iron Chef" episode, where he
made bacon. There he had a separate firebox and ran the smoke through
some dryer ducts or something to cool it off.

<http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season5/Bacon/BaconTranscript.htm>




Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)


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On 6 Jul 2007 16:53:59 GMT, "Default User" >
wrote:

>modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 02:43:50 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message

>
>> >> Thanks, Ed. Can you cold smoke in this unit?

>
>> > No and yes. The setup as it is gets too hot, but, what I've done
>> > with my old (similar design) smoker is to use a $10 electric
>> > hotplate and a pan of sawdust for the smoke and it worked very
>> > well. You can use a hotplate and a cardboard box too.

>>
>> I saw that episode of Good Eats. A classic.

>
>
>I'll point out that AB wasn't cold-smoking in that episode, as he
>stated in the show. The rig is so small that it's hot-smoking, although
>at a relatively low temperature.
>
><http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season4/Salmon/SalmonTranscript.htm>
>
>
>He did do true cold-smoking in the "Scrap Iron Chef" episode, where he
>made bacon. There he had a separate firebox and ran the smoke through
>some dryer ducts or something to cool it off.
>
><http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season5/Bacon/BaconTranscript.htm>
>
>

I'd stand corrected, but I'm sitting down.
--

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modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
> On 6 Jul 2007 16:53:59 GMT, "Default User" >
> wrote:
>
>> modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
>>
>>> On Fri, 06 Jul 2007 02:43:50 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> "modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message

>>
>>>>> Thanks, Ed. Can you cold smoke in this unit?

>>
>>>> No and yes. The setup as it is gets too hot, but, what I've done
>>>> with my old (similar design) smoker is to use a $10 electric
>>>> hotplate and a pan of sawdust for the smoke and it worked very
>>>> well. You can use a hotplate and a cardboard box too.
>>>
>>> I saw that episode of Good Eats. A classic.

>>
>>
>> I'll point out that AB wasn't cold-smoking in that episode, as he
>> stated in the show. The rig is so small that it's hot-smoking,
>> although at a relatively low temperature.
>>
>> <http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season4/Salmon/SalmonTranscript.htm>
>>
>>
>> He did do true cold-smoking in the "Scrap Iron Chef" episode, where
>> he made bacon. There he had a separate firebox and ran the smoke
>> through some dryer ducts or something to cool it off.
>>
>> <http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season5/Bacon/BaconTranscript.htm>
>>
>>

> I'd stand corrected, but I'm sitting down.


'Twas midnight on the ocean, not a streetcar was in sight,
the sun was shining brightly, for it'd rained all day that night.
'Twas a summer's day in winter, and the snow was raining fast,
as a barefoot boy with shoes on stood sitting in the grass.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 13:20:44 -0700, "Dave Bugg" >
wrote:

>yetanotherBob wrote:
>
>> If you're interested in an electric smoker that you can pretty much
>> set and forget, check out the Cookshack products. They're more
>> durable and efficient than the Bradleys, and they don't require the
>> proprietary pucks to produce smoke.

>
>I agree with Bob on this. You can use your own wood or lump charcoal. And a
>little goes a long way.
>http://www.cookshack.com/


Dave,

Any opinion on the Masterbuilt Electric Smoker?
http://tinyurl.com/2u7qho
My local Sam's Club here in Ontario, Canada has them on seasonal
clearance for CAN $181.00

Thanks,

Ross.
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wrote:

> Dave,
>
> Any opinion on the Masterbuilt Electric Smoker?
>
http://tinyurl.com/2u7qho

The electric Masterbuilts are a less mature iteration of the Cook Shacks. I
like that Masterbuilt also insulates the box. I think that they turn out
pretty good bbq.

The downside is grease control. Even though it does have a grease collector
of sorts, it gets really messy in the box. You will need to plan on spending
a lot more time cleaning it out. It helps to use a large pan placed on the
shelf below the meat to catch the drippings. It also helps to line the
bottom with aluminum foil -- punching a hole through the drain hole.
Denatured alcohol works well at getting grease off of stainless steel.

I don't know how durable the electric element is, so check with Masterbuilt
to find out how much replacements are and how to do the replacement.

For the dollars, it looks like a good deal. BTW, if Sam's is carrying both
the stainless and the black exteriors, consider that the black won't get
near as grungy looking as the stainless steel model and so requires less
cosmetic cleaning of the outside. The insides are the same.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Default Bradley smokers?

On Sat, 7 Jul 2007 12:01:04 -0700, "Dave Bugg" >
wrote:

wrote:
>
>> Dave,
>>
>> Any opinion on the Masterbuilt Electric Smoker?
>> http://tinyurl.com/2u7qho

>
>The electric Masterbuilts are a less mature iteration of the Cook Shacks. I
>like that Masterbuilt also insulates the box. I think that they turn out
>pretty good bbq.
>
>The downside is grease control. Even though it does have a grease collector
>of sorts, it gets really messy in the box. You will need to plan on spending
>a lot more time cleaning it out. It helps to use a large pan placed on the
>shelf below the meat to catch the drippings. It also helps to line the
>bottom with aluminum foil -- punching a hole through the drain hole.
>Denatured alcohol works well at getting grease off of stainless steel.
>
>I don't know how durable the electric element is, so check with Masterbuilt
>to find out how much replacements are and how to do the replacement.
>
>For the dollars, it looks like a good deal. BTW, if Sam's is carrying both
>the stainless and the black exteriors, consider that the black won't get
>near as grungy looking as the stainless steel model and so requires less
>cosmetic cleaning of the outside. The insides are the same.


Thanks Dave.

They only had the all stainless model so I figured for almost $150.00
off the regular price I couldn't lose so, I picked one up.
Stopped in to our usual supermarket on the way home and was really
happy to see that they had whole boneless pork loin halves on sale for
$1.47/lb. Picked up four of them, cut two in half and the other two
into nice thick chops. Froze two of the half loins and half of the
chops. Put the rest into the Masterbuilt along with 8 whole pork
hocks, set it at 225F and let it do its thing. Used hickory chips and
the pork came out beautifully.
Had some of the hocks along with some home made sauerkraut for supper
last night. (I don't know about the rest of the country but, hocks and
kraut is a regional favourite in these parts). We really enjoyed them.
I think I'm going to try a small turkey pretty soon.

Ross.


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Default Bradley smokers?

"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
...
> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html
> --
>
> modom
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>


Had one sold it. Can't say I was impressed. They worked ok, but you get
tired of the smoke flavor quickly. I went back to a gas and charcoal setup
with wood chunks. I get a much lighter smoke flavor but one that is more
pleasing. I don't think they are worth the money.

Somebody!

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Default Bradley smokers?

On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 23:04:15 -0700, "Somebody" >
wrote:

>"modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
.. .
>> Anybody have experience and opinions about these?
>> http://www.bradleysmoker.com/main-pa...=products.html


>Had one sold it. Can't say I was impressed. They worked ok, but you get
>tired of the smoke flavor quickly. I went back to a gas and charcoal setup
>with wood chunks. I get a much lighter smoke flavor but one that is more
>pleasing. I don't think they are worth the money.
>
>Somebody!


Ya. I got a Great Outdoors Smokey Mountains propane smoker. The
negatives for the bradley were too cogently argued.
--

modom

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